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Naming conventions for regular variables

P: n/a
mk

http://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0008/

"Function Names

Function names should be lowercase, with words separated by underscores
as necessary to improve readability."

However, this PEP does not recommend any particular style for naming
regular (local) variables.

Personally I like "mixedCase", however using both styles looks a bit weird:

def some_function_name(someVariableName, anotherVar)

Naming both functions and variables using "lowercase with underscore
separator between words for readability" leads to confusing function
names with variable names - and distinguishing between variables and
function names just by looking at them would be nice.

Recommendations?

Jul 4 '08 #1
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P: n/a
mk <mr****@gmail.comwrites:
http://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0008/

"Function Names

Function names should be lowercase, with words separated by
underscores as necessary to improve readability."

However, this PEP does not recommend any particular style for naming
regular (local) variables.
Yes, it does: "Method Names and Instance Variables" applies. Any
object that isn't a class is an "instance", to be named according to
that section.
Personally I like "mixedCase"
Nothing in PEP 8 allows mixedCase (except for the rare degenerate case
where you're constrained to closely follow an existing naming
convention). It's always TitleCase or lowercase, with or without
underscores.
Naming both functions and variables using "lowercase with underscore
separator between words for readability" leads to confusing function
names with variable names - and distinguishing between variables and
function names just by looking at them would be nice.
Functions are first-class objects in Python, and many non-function
objects are callable. So, such an arbitrary distinction wouldn't be
helpful.

It's more sensible to distinguish by *usage*: is it being called or
not?
Recommendations?
Follow PEP 8, including the avoidance of mixedCase.

--
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`\ specifically.” —Steven Wright |
_o__) |
Ben Finney
Jul 4 '08 #2

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