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Python 3000 vs. Python 2.x

P: n/a
As a new comer to Python I was wondering which is the best to start
learning. I've read that a number of significant features have
changed between the two versions. Yet, the majority of Python
programs out in the world are 2.x and it would be nice to understand
those as well. Thanks for all the help.

Creosote,
Jun 27 '08 #1
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6 Replies

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On Jun 13, 4:04*pm, mr.opus.peng...@gmail.com wrote:
As a new comer to Python I was wondering which is the best to start
learning. *I've read that a number of significant features have
changed between the two versions. *Yet, the majority of Python
programs out in the world are 2.x and it would be nice to understand
those as well. *Thanks for all the help.

Creosote,
What 3rd party modules are you planning to use?

You won't be able to use them until their developers release
Python 3000 versions.

In my research, I heavily depend on the gmpy module for
fast, number theoretic functions. Last time I checked,
it was only available for v2.5.

So, I could install v2.6 or v3.0, but I wouldn't be able
to run any of my programs, so what would be the point?
Jun 27 '08 #2

P: n/a
On Jun 13, 4:13 pm, Mensanator <mensana...@aol.comwrote:
On Jun 13, 4:04 pm, mr.opus.peng...@gmail.com wrote:
As a new comer to Python I was wondering which is the best to start
learning. I've read that a number of significant features have
changed between the two versions. Yet, the majority of Python
programs out in the world are 2.x and it would be nice to understand
those as well. Thanks for all the help.
Creosote,

What 3rd party modules are you planning to use?

You won't be able to use them until their developers release
Python 3000 versions.

In my research, I heavily depend on the gmpy module for
fast, number theoretic functions. Last time I checked,
it was only available for v2.5.

So, I could install v2.6 or v3.0, but I wouldn't be able
to run any of my programs, so what would be the point?
Thanks for the advice. I guess I don't really know about what kind of
modules I'm going to be using as I'm new to this whole style of
programming. The only other languages I've used are Fortran, C, and
Lisp. I venture to say that I'd probably be using math, and graphics
modules.
Jun 27 '08 #3

P: n/a

<mr*************@gmail.comwrote in message
news:2c**********************************@y21g2000 hsf.googlegroups.com...
| As a new comer to Python I was wondering which is the best to start
| learning. I've read that a number of significant features have
| changed between the two versions. Yet, the majority of Python
| programs out in the world are 2.x and it would be nice to understand
| those as well. Thanks for all the help.

The core language is pretty much the same. If you forget about the new
advanced features, a major difference is the removal of old stuff not
needed any more. So basic 3.0 should be a bit easier to learn. So my
advice (probably minority yet) would be to start with 3.0 (once the first
beta is out next week) and move back when you have a need to.

Jun 27 '08 #4

P: n/a
mr*************@gmail.com wrote:
As a new comer to Python I was wondering which is the best to start
learning. I've read that a number of significant features have
changed between the two versions. Yet, the majority of Python
programs out in the world are 2.x and it would be nice to understand
those as well. Thanks for all the help.

Creosote,
You should learn Python 2. Python 3 is only in alpha/beta, and it won't
be very relevant for several years.

Python 3 isn't a whole new language; it just breaks backwards
compatibility to clean up old warts and make other improvements. It
won't be too hard to transition to it when you decide to.
--
Jun 27 '08 #5

P: n/a
On Jun 13, 5:04 pm, mr.opus.peng...@gmail.com wrote:
As a new comer to Python I was wondering which is the best to start
learning. I've read that a number of significant features have
changed between the two versions. Yet, the majority of Python
programs out in the world are 2.x and it would be nice to understand
those as well. Thanks for all the help.
Learn 2.5. When (or if) Python 3 becomes relevant in a few years down
the road, you'll be able to pick up the differences and new features
in a week or so.

George
Jun 27 '08 #6

P: n/a
mr*************@gmail.com wrote:
As a new comer to Python I was wondering which is the best to start
learning. I've read that a number of significant features have
changed between the two versions. Yet, the majority of Python
programs out in the world are 2.x and it would be nice to understand
those as well. Thanks for all the help.
My advice from the perspective of a Python core developer: Stick to the
2.x series. It's going to take a couple of years until third party
extensions and books have adopted to Python 3.x.

Christian

Jun 27 '08 #7

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