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DISLIN Manual

P: n/a
I am at the very beginning of the DISLIN 9.3 Manual: 1.4 Quickplots

Some quickplots are added to the DISLIN module which are collections
of DISLIN routines for displaying data with one command. For example,
the function ’plot’ displays two-dimensional curves. Example:
from Numeric import *
from dislin import *
x = arange (100, typecode=Float32)
plot (x, sin (x/5))
disfin ()

Problems:

1. "from Numeric import * " statement produced an error message, I
had to replace it with "from numpy import *"

2. The "from dislin import *" statement produced an error message:
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<pyshell#1>", line 1, in <module>
from dislin import *
ImportError: No module named dislin

I checked the environmental variables paths and they are according to
instructions. What else to do?

Any help will be much appreciated

Adolfo
Jun 27 '08 #1
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P: n/a
adolfo wrote:
I am at the very beginning of the DISLIN 9.3 Manual: 1.4 Quickplots
I recommend asking the DISLIN author. I don't think that DISLIN is widely used
in Python.
Some quickplots are added to the DISLIN module which are collections
of DISLIN routines for displaying data with one command. For example,
the function ’plot’ displays two-dimensional curves. Example:
from Numeric import *
from dislin import *
x = arange (100, typecode=Float32)
plot (x, sin (x/5))
disfin ()

Problems:

1. "from Numeric import * " statement produced an error message, I
had to replace it with "from numpy import *"
If DISLIN still uses Numeric rather than numpy, you will probably need to use
Numeric, too.

--
Robert Kern

"I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma
that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret it as though it had
an underlying truth."
-- Umberto Eco

Jun 27 '08 #2

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