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Re: Finally had to plonk google gorups.

Mike Driscoll wrote:
Steve,

My workplace doesn't offer NNTP, so there is no good way to browse
c.l.py here. And I haven't been able to get NNTP to work from my home
either.
I rarely use NNTP these days. I access c.l.py exclusively via e-mail,
and that works very well. In some cases there is a lot of spam that
gets filtered out of the nntp side, but makes it through to the smtp
side (like that religious spam a few months back). But I see absolutely
none of the google groups problems that Grant mentioned. I view my
python list mail in gmail, and get about 1-2 spam messages a day in the
python list.

This official python list is one of the few lists that's even still on
nntp. All my other ones (gnome, gtk, openldap, clamav, freeradius, etc)
are all e-mail mailing lists only and it works very well. In fact, I
think it's much better since list subscription can actually be
controlled by someone.
Jun 27 '08 #1
11 2411
Hallöchen!

Michael Torrie writes:
[...]

This official python list is one of the few lists that's even
still on nntp. All my other ones (gnome, gtk, openldap, clamav,
freeradius, etc) are all e-mail mailing lists only and it works
very well. In fact, I think it's much better since list
subscription can actually be controlled by someone.
The admistrative overhead of mailing lists is tedious. Fortunately,
most important computer-related lists are on gmane.org. We could
list c.l.py there, too. ;-)

Tschö,
Torsten.

--
Torsten Bronger, aquisgrana, europa vetus
Jabber ID: br*****@jabber.org
(See http://ime.webhop.org for further contact info.)
Jun 27 '08 #2
On 2008-04-16, Michael Torrie <to*****@gmail.comwrote:
>My workplace doesn't offer NNTP, so there is no good way to browse
c.l.py here.
Browse it via the mailing list using gmane.org. There are no
ads and your postings won't get plonked by everybody.
>And I haven't been able to get NNTP to work from my home
either.

I rarely use NNTP these days. I access c.l.py exclusively via
e-mail, and that works very well. In some cases there is a
lot of spam that gets filtered out of the nntp side, but makes
it through to the smtp side (like that religious spam a few
months back). But I see absolutely none of the google groups
problems that Grant mentioned. I view my python list mail in
gmail, and get about 1-2 spam messages a day in the python
list.

This official python list is one of the few lists that's even
still on nntp. All my other ones (gnome, gtk, openldap,
clamav, freeradius, etc) are all e-mail mailing lists only and
it works very well. In fact, I think it's much better since
list subscription can actually be controlled by someone.
Since gmane.org makes all the e-mail lists I care about
available via NNTP, I can still use a news client to read
"e-mail mailing lists only". I've always found that news
clients are much better at handling things like mailing lists
than e-mail clients.

--
Grant Edwards grante Yow! Quick, sing me the
at BUDAPEST NATIONAL ANTHEM!!
visi.com
Jun 27 '08 #3
Torsten Bronger wrote:
The admistrative overhead of mailing lists is tedious. Fortunately,
most important computer-related lists are on gmane.org. We could
list c.l.py there, too. ;-)
Running a few lists myself, I don't see this. How is administrative
overhead tedious? Most open source projects do it, so I wonder just how
tedious it is. Of all the projects I'm associated with in lists, Python
is the only one still clinging to NNTP when it appears a normal mail
list is just as good.
Jun 27 '08 #4
Hallöchen!

Michael Torrie writes:
Torsten Bronger wrote:
>The admistrative overhead of mailing lists is tedious.
Fortunately, most important computer-related lists are on
gmane.org. We could list c.l.py there, too. ;-)

Running a few lists myself, I don't see this. How is
administrative overhead tedious? Most open source projects do it,
so I wonder just how tedious it is. Of all the projects I'm
associated with in lists, Python is the only one still clinging to
NNTP when it appears a normal mail list is just as good.
Perish the thought that I ever have to go back to mailing lists
again! Finding the web page, entering name and email address and a
password, waiting for request for confirmation, sending out
confirmation, clicking away welcome message, setting filter in email
program, and doing the same for unsubscribing a few days later after
having found out that it's not so interesting after all. No.

Just going to the group list, search the group, pressing "U" -- and
getting all the postings of the past, too! And for unsubscribing,
press "U" again. No email address, no password, no filters, no
hassle. And spam is also very rare in my groups.

Tschö,
Torsten.

--
Torsten Bronger, aquisgrana, europa vetus
Jabber ID: br*****@jabber.org
(See http://ime.webhop.org for further contact info.)
Jun 27 '08 #5
Torsten Bronger wrote:
Hallöchen!

Michael Torrie writes:
>[...]

This official python list is one of the few lists that's even
still on nntp. All my other ones (gnome, gtk, openldap, clamav,
freeradius, etc) are all e-mail mailing lists only and it works
very well. In fact, I think it's much better since list
subscription can actually be controlled by someone.

The admistrative overhead of mailing lists is tedious. Fortunately,
most important computer-related lists are on gmane.org. We could
list c.l.py there, too. ;-)
c.l.py has been on gmane for years, as comp.python.general (why they
have to have their own naming hierarchy i have never understood).

regards
Steve
--
Steve Holden +1 571 484 6266 +1 800 494 3119
Holden Web LLC http://www.holdenweb.com/

Jun 27 '08 #6
Hallöchen!

Steve Holden writes:
Torsten Bronger wrote:
>[...]

The admistrative overhead of mailing lists is tedious.
Fortunately, most important computer-related lists are on
gmane.org. We could list c.l.py there, too. ;-)

c.l.py has been on gmane for years, as comp.python.general (why
they have to have their own naming hierarchy i have never
understood).
Oops, I overlooked this amongst all these interesting groups. ;-)

But I don't need it either. Apparently, it also depends on the NNTP
server admin team, and I have a very good one
(http://www.individual.net/). I also see spam, but not much (7
among the most recent 1000 postings on c.l.py).

Tschö,
Torsten.

--
Torsten Bronger, aquisgrana, europa vetus
Jabber ID: br*****@jabber.org
(See http://ime.webhop.org for further contact info.)
Jun 27 '08 #7
On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 10:39:16 -0600
Michael Torrie <to*****@gmail.comwrote:
Running a few lists myself, I don't see this. How is administrative
overhead tedious? Most open source projects do it, so I wonder just how
tedious it is. Of all the projects I'm associated with in lists, Python
is the only one still clinging to NNTP when it appears a normal mail
list is just as good.
Especially given that Mailman, a Python program, can handle all the
heavy lifting anyway.

--
D'Arcy J.M. Cain <da***@druid.net | Democracy is three wolves
http://www.druid.net/darcy/ | and a sheep voting on
+1 416 425 1212 (DoD#0082) (eNTP) | what's for dinner.
Jun 27 '08 #8
Michael Torrie <to*****@gmail.comwrites:
I rarely use NNTP these days. I access c.l.py exclusively via e-mail,
and that works very well.
I rarely use email for technical mailing lists these days. I access
such forums exclusively via NNTP <URL:nntp://news.gmane.org>, and that
works very well.
This official python list is one of the few lists that's even still on
nntp. All my other ones (gnome, gtk, openldap, clamav, freeradius, etc)
are all e-mail mailing lists only and it works very well. In fact, I
think it's much better since list subscription can actually be
controlled by someone.
Most technical mailing lists are accessible via NNTP on gmane.org. It
works very well.

Other discussion groups remain on Usenet, accessible via NNTP from
servers around the world that mirror each group. In fact, I think it's
much better since I can use any one of those servers, and the content
isn't locked up in one specific server.

--
\ "I'm beginning to think that life is just one long Yoko Ono |
`\ album; no rhyme or reason, just a lot of incoherent shrieks and |
_o__) then it's over." -- Ian Wolff |
Ben Finney
Jun 27 '08 #9
Ben Finney wrote:
Michael Torrie <to*****@gmail.comwrites:
>I rarely use NNTP these days. I access c.l.py exclusively via e-mail,
and that works very well.

I rarely use email for technical mailing lists these days. I access
such forums exclusively via NNTP <URL:nntp://news.gmane.org>, and that
works very well.
>This official python list is one of the few lists that's even still on
nntp. All my other ones (gnome, gtk, openldap, clamav, freeradius, etc)
are all e-mail mailing lists only and it works very well. In fact, I
think it's much better since list subscription can actually be
controlled by someone.

Most technical mailing lists are accessible via NNTP on gmane.org. It
works very well.

Other discussion groups remain on Usenet, accessible via NNTP from
servers around the world that mirror each group. In fact, I think it's
much better since I can use any one of those servers, and the content
isn't locked up in one specific server.
The duff thung about mailing lists is the way they fill your mailbox up
when you don't have time for them. Hundreds of unread messages all
screaming for your attention.

When c.l.py drops too far down the priority list I just stop reading it.
Messages float by, expire and drop off the list without any action
from me.

regards
Steve
--
Steve Holden +1 571 484 6266 +1 800 494 3119
Holden Web LLC http://www.holdenweb.com/

Jun 27 '08 #10
En Wed, 16 Apr 2008 14:23:57 -0300, Steve Holden <st***@holdenweb.comescribió:
Torsten Bronger wrote:
>The admistrative overhead of mailing lists is tedious. Fortunately,
most important computer-related lists are on gmane.org. We could
list c.l.py there, too. ;-)
c.l.py has been on gmane for years, as comp.python.general (why they
have to have their own naming hierarchy i have never understood).
Because "someone" chose that name when he/she asked for the list to be added; the name gmane.comp.lang.python *could* have been used, but wasn't.
(gmane uses its own hierarchy because not all mirrored lists exist as a newsgroup outside gmane, and there are potential name conflicts)

--
Gabriel Genellina

Jun 27 '08 #11

"Gabriel Genellina" <ga*******@yahoo.com.arwrote in message
news:op***************@a98gizw.cpe.telecentro.net. ar...
En Wed, 16 Apr 2008 14:23:57 -0300, Steve Holden <st***@holdenweb.com>
escribió:
Torsten Bronger wrote:
>The admistrative overhead of mailing lists is tedious. Fortunately,
most important computer-related lists are on gmane.org. We could
list c.l.py there, too. ;-)
c.l.py has been on gmane for years, as comp.python.general (why they
have to have their own naming hierarchy i have never understood).
Because "someone" chose that name when he/she asked for the list to be
added; the name gmane.comp.lang.python *could* have been used, but wasn't.
(gmane uses its own hierarchy because not all mirrored lists exist as a
newsgroup outside gmane, and there are potential name conflicts)
==================

Gmane mirror mailing lists, not usenet newsgroups. There are over 200
gmane.comp.python.* groups. As far as I know, only 2 are also regular
newsgroups. c.l.p, and c.l.p.announce. and those only because they are
first gatewayed to python.org mailing lists. In other words,
gmane.comp.python.general mirrors python-list @ python.org

Jun 27 '08 #12

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