By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
449,367 Members | 1,750 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 449,367 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

Image handling - stupid question

P: n/a
I'm going to try to write some imange manipulation code (scaling, reading
EXIF and IPTC info) and just want to ask if PIL is *THE* library to use?

I looked at <http://www.pythonware.com/products/pil/and noticed that the
latest version is from Dec 2006.

In my experience that means that either it's abandoned or that it's very good
and stable.

Jun 27 '08 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
5 Replies


P: n/a
Jumping Arne wrote:
I'm going to try to write some imange manipulation code (scaling, reading
EXIF and IPTC info) and just want to ask if PIL is *THE* library to use?

I looked at <http://www.pythonware.com/products/pil/and noticed that the
latest version is from Dec 2006.

In my experience that means that either it's abandoned or that it's very
good and stable.
Certainly the latter.

Diez
Jun 27 '08 #2

P: n/a
Jumping Arne a écrit :
I'm going to try to write some imange manipulation code (scaling, reading
EXIF and IPTC info) and just want to ask if PIL is *THE* library to use?

I looked at <http://www.pythonware.com/products/pil/and noticed that the
latest version is from Dec 2006.

In my experience that means that either it's abandoned
I doubt it is.
or that it's very good
and stable.
My own experience is that it's indeed a pretty good and AFAICT stable
library.

Jun 27 '08 #3

P: n/a
On Apr 16, 12:21 pm, Jumping Arne <arn...@mac.comwrote:
I'm going to try to write some imange manipulation code (scaling, reading
EXIF and IPTC info) and just want to ask if PIL is *THE* library to use?
Depends on your requirements, but it's certainly the first library I
would check out. It offers lots of functionality, it is easy to use,
well documented and rock solid.
I looked at <http://www.pythonware.com/products/pil/and noticed that the
latest version is from Dec 2006.

In my experience that means that either it's abandoned or that it's very good
and stable.
The latter (what else would you expect from /F? :)

2B
Jun 27 '08 #4

P: n/a
On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 12:21:13 +0200, Jumping Arne wrote
(in article <00*****************************@news.individual.d e>):
I'm going to try to write some imange manipulation code (scaling, reading
EXIF and IPTC info) and just want to ask if PIL is *THE* library to use?

I looked at <http://www.pythonware.com/products/pil/and noticed that the
latest version is from Dec 2006.

In my experience that means that either it's abandoned or that it's very good
and stable.
Sounds like PIL is a safe option, thanks.

Jun 27 '08 #5

P: n/a
Jumping Arne wrote:
On Wed, 16 Apr 2008 12:21:13 +0200, Jumping Arne wrote
(in article <00*****************************@news.individual.d e>):

>I'm going to try to write some imange manipulation code (scaling, reading
EXIF and IPTC info) and just want to ask if PIL is *THE* library to use?

I looked at <http://www.pythonware.com/products/pil/and noticed that the
latest version is from Dec 2006.

In my experience that means that either it's abandoned or that it's very good

>and stable.


Sounds like PIL is a safe option, thanks.
Yes, certainly, PIL is the way to go. But beyond that, if you are going
to do any fancy manipulation of the array of pixels (e.g., image
processing, image recognition, convolution, ...), then I'd recommend
numpy for the array manipulation. (And perhaps even the full-blown
scipy.) Numpy can easily access and manipulate the pixel arrays
produced by PIL. It's an awesome combination.

Gary Herron
Jun 27 '08 #6

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.