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ISO Python example projects (like in Perl Cookbook)

kj

I'm looking for "example implementations" of small projects in
Python, similar to the ones given at the end of most chapters of
The Perl Cookbook (2nd edition, isbn: 0596003137). (Unfortunately,
the otherwise excellent Python Cookbook (2nd edition, isbn:
0596007973), by the same publisher (O'Reilly), does not have this
great feature.)

The subchapters devoted to these small projects (which are called
"Program"s in the book), each consists of a description of the
task, a discussion of the relevant design considerations, and one
or more illustrative implementations. As such, these programs are
larger and more complex than the typical "recipe" in the book, but
are still short enough to be read and understood in a few minutes.

I find the study of such small programs invaluable when learning
a new language.

Does anyone know of a source of similar material for Python?

TIA!

kynn
--
NOTE: In my address everything before the first period is backwards;
and the last period, and everything after it, should be discarded.
Jan 10 '08 #1
4 1322
On Jan 10, 10:13 am, kj <so...@987jk.com.invalidwrote:
I'm looking for "example implementations" of small projects in
Python, similar to the ones given at the end of most chapters of
The Perl Cookbook (2nd edition, isbn: 0596003137). (Unfortunately,
the otherwise excellent Python Cookbook (2nd edition, isbn:
0596007973), by the same publisher (O'Reilly), does not have this
great feature.)

The subchapters devoted to these small projects (which are called
"Program"s in the book), each consists of a description of the
task, a discussion of the relevant design considerations, and one
or more illustrative implementations. As such, these programs are
larger and more complex than the typical "recipe" in the book, but
are still short enough to be read and understood in a few minutes.

I find the study of such small programs invaluable when learning
a new language.

Does anyone know of a source of similar material for Python?

TIA!

kynn
--
NOTE: In my address everything before the first period is backwards;
and the last period, and everything after it, should be discarded.
I know that Hetland's book, "Beginning Python" has some projects in
the back. Zelle's book ("Python Programming: An Introduction to
Computer Science") has exercises of sorts at the end of each of the
chapters.

Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner walks the reader through
designing some games with the pygame module...and for some involved
reading, I would recommend Lutz's tome, "Programming Python 3rd Ed.",
which has various projects throughout that the author goes into in
depth.

I've seen tutorials of varying worth on devshed.com and good articles
on IBM's site as well.

Mike
Jan 10 '08 #2
Have a look at Dive into Python by Mark Pilgrim. It is available for
free here http://www.diveintopython.org/.

Andy
Jan 10 '08 #3
On Jan 10, 11:13 am, kj <so...@987jk.com.invalidwrote:
I'm looking for "example implementations" of small projects in
Python, similar to the ones given at the end of most chapters of
The Perl Cookbook (2nd edition, isbn: 0596003137). (Unfortunately,
the otherwise excellent Python Cookbook (2nd edition, isbn:
0596007973), by the same publisher (O'Reilly), does not have this
great feature.)

The subchapters devoted to these small projects (which are called
"Program"s in the book), each consists of a description of the
task, a discussion of the relevant design considerations, and one
or more illustrative implementations. As such, these programs are
larger and more complex than the typical "recipe" in the book, but
are still short enough to be read and understood in a few minutes.

I find the study of such small programs invaluable when learning
a new language.

Does anyone know of a source of similar material for Python?

TIA!

kynn
--
NOTE: In my address everything before the first period is backwards;
and the last period, and everything after it, should be discarded.
http://pleac.sourceforge.net/pleac_python/index.html

Jan 10 '08 #4
"Delaney, Timothy (Tim)" <td******@avaya.comwrote:
>
You know you've been working at a large company for too long when you
see that subject and think "ISO-certified Python?"
That's exactly what I thought, too. After reading the post I assume he
actually meant "In Search Of"?
--
Tim Roberts, ti**@probo.com
Providenza & Boekelheide, Inc.
Jan 12 '08 #5

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