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Tuples !?!?

Hi,

Is the tuple comparison brooked in python ?!?!?

Thanks.

Try this and you will see funny things:

# -*- coding: cp1252 -*-
import random
import csv
import struct
import array

def gera_string(res):

# acampo3
acampo3=((0,5,'muito reduzidos'),(6,20,'reduzidos'),
(21,32,'satisfatórios'),(33,40,'bons'),(41,45,'exc elentes'))
# acampo4
acampo4=((0,2,'reduzidos'),(3,4,'medianos'),(5,5,' elevadas'))
# acampo5
acampo5=((0,2,'reduzidos'),(3,4,'médias'),(5,5,'el evados'))
# acampo6
acampo6=((0,2,'fracos'),(3,4,'satisfatórios'),(5,5 ,'elevados'))
# acampo7
acampo7=((0,2,'pouco'),(3,4,'bastante'),(5,5,'quas e sempre'))
# acampo8
acampo8=((0,4,'mal'),(5,9,'satisfatoriamente'),(10 ,10,'de forma
exemplar'))
# acampo9
acampo9=((0,2,'muito reduzidos'),(3,4,'reduzidos'),
(5,8,'satisfatórios'),(9,10,'elevados'))
# acampo10
acampo10=((0,2,'pouco'),(3,4,'bastante'),(5,5,'mui to'))
# acampo11
acampo11=((0,2,'muito pouco'),(3,4,'pouco'),(5,8,'bastante'),
(9,10,'grande'))

campo1=res[0]
campo2=res[1]
campo3=res[2]
campo4=res[3]
campo5=res[4]
campo6=res[5]
campo7=res[6]
campo8=res[7]
campo9=res[8]
campo10=res[9]
campo11=res[10]

for a in acampo3:
x=a[0]
y=res[2]
z=a[1]
print x
print y
print z
print x < y
print y < z
print z < y
if a[0] <= res[2] <= a[1]:
campo3=a[2]

for a in acampo4:
if (res[3]>=a[0] and res[3]<=a[1]):
campo4=a[2]

for a in acampo5:
if (res[4]>=a[0] and res[4]<=a[1]):
campo5=a[2]

for a in acampo6:
if (res[5]>=a[0] and res[5]<=a[1]):
campo6=a[2]

for a in acampo7:
if (res[6]>=a[0] and res[6]<=a[1]):
campo7=a[2]

for a in acampo8:
if (res[7]>=a[0] and res[7]<=a[1]):
campo8=a[2]

for a in acampo9:
if (res[8]>=a[0] and res[8]<=a[1]):
campo9=a[2]

for a in acampo10:
if (res[9]>=a[0] and res[9]<=a[1]):
campo10=a[2]

for a in acampo11:
if (res[10]>=a[0] and res[10]<=a[1]):
campo11=a[10]

...

return frase

# processar

f=open('leituras.csv','rb')
csv.register_dialect('dialecto', delimiter=';',
quoting=csv.QUOTE_NONE)
leitor =csv.reader(f,'dialecto')

for res in leitor:
print res
print gera_string(res)

f.close()

quit()

Dec 11 '07 #1
11 1160
On 2007-12-11, aa*****@gmail.com <aa*****@gmail.comwrote:
Hi,

Is the tuple comparison brooked in python ?!?!?
No.
Thanks.
You're welcome.
Try this and you will see funny things:
No thanks.

Maybe you could to post a smaller, easier to read example of
what you think is broken?

--
Grant Edwards grante Yow! I demand IMPUNITY!
at
visi.com
Dec 11 '07 #2
aa*****@gmail.com a écrit :
Hi,

Is the tuple comparison brooked in python ?!?!?
Given the size and average level of the user base, I think this would
have been noticed.
>
Try this
If you hope anyone to try anything, please post the *minimal* working
code showing the problem. And while your at it, also explain the
expected result.
and you will see funny things:
Sorry but the only thing I see so far is that your code needs refactoring.
Dec 11 '07 #3
Is the tuple comparison brooked in python ?!?!?
>
No.
Thanks.

You're welcome.

HHH! That just made my day. Too funny.

2B
Dec 11 '07 #4
Ok. This is small code.

The problem is '2' != 2 there is a way of converting 'some number' in
number ?

Thanks.

# -*- coding: cp1252 -*-
import random
import csv
import struct
import array

# resultados para colocar nos campos
def gera_string(res):

# acampo3
acampo1=((0,5,'muito reduzidos'),(6,20,'reduzidos'),
(21,32,'satisfatórios'),(33,40,'bons'),(41,45,'exc elentes'))
campo1=''

for a in acampo1:
print res[1]
if (res[1]>=a[0] and res[1]<=a[1]):
campo1=a[2]

return campo1

# processar

res=['a','2']

print gera_string(res)

quit()
On 11 Dez, 20:40, Bruno Desthuilliers
<bdesth.quelquech...@free.quelquepart.frwrote:
aara...@gmail.com a écrit :
Hi,
Is the tuple comparison brooked in python ?!?!?

Given the size and average level of the user base, I think this would
have been noticed.
Try this

If you hope anyone to try anything, please post the *minimal* working
code showing the problem. And while your at it, also explain the
expected result.
and you will see funny things:

Sorry but the only thing I see so far is that your code needs refactoring.
Dec 11 '07 #5
On 11 Dez, 22:02, aara...@gmail.com wrote:
Ok. This is small code.

The problem is '2' != 2 there is a way of converting 'some number' in
number ?

Thanks.

# -*- coding: cp1252 -*-
import random
import csv
import struct
import array

# resultados para colocar nos campos
def gera_string(res):

# acampo3
acampo1=((0,5,'muito reduzidos'),(6,20,'reduzidos'),
(21,32,'satisfatórios'),(33,40,'bons'),(41,45,'exc elentes'))
campo1=''

for a in acampo1:
print res[1]
if (res[1]>=a[0] and res[1]<=a[1]):
campo1=a[2]

return campo1

# processar

res=['a','2']

print gera_string(res)

quit()

On 11 Dez, 20:40, Bruno Desthuilliers

<bdesth.quelquech...@free.quelquepart.frwrote:
aara...@gmail.com a écrit :
Hi,
Thanks. I have found that there is int() function on python. The print
function always show me a number when was 'number'. Ok thanks.
Is the tuple comparison brooked in python ?!?!?
Given the size and average level of the user base, I think this would
have been noticed.
Try this
If you hope anyone to try anything, please post the *minimal* working
code showing the problem. And while your at it, also explain the
expected result.
and you will see funny things:
Sorry but the only thing I see so far is that your code needs refactoring.
Dec 11 '07 #6
On 12/11/2007 5:08 PM, aa*****@gmail.com wrote:
On 11 Dez, 22:02, aara...@gmail.com wrote:
>Ok. This is small code.

The problem is '2' != 2 there is a way of converting 'some number' in
number ?

<snip>

>>ord('2')
50
>>chr(50) == '2'
True
>>int('2')
2
>>int('2') == 2
True
>>>
Dec 11 '07 #7
aa*****@gmail.com a écrit :
Ok. This is small code.

The problem is '2' != 2
It would indeed be a problem if this expression eval'd to True. That's
the case in some, hem, 'languages', and believe me it's *not* the
RightThing.
there is a way of converting 'some number' in
number ?
assert(2 == int(2))

Anything else about tuples ?-)
Dec 12 '07 #8
Bruno Desthuilliers wrote:
aa*****@gmail.com a écrit :
>The problem is '2' != 2

It would indeed be a problem if this expression eval'd to True.
That's the case in some, hem, 'languages', and believe me it's
*not* the RightThing.
What kind of "hem" language is this? :)
>>'2' != 2
True
>>>
Regards,
Björn

--
BOFH excuse #430:

Mouse has out-of-cheese-error

Dec 12 '07 #9
Bjoern Schliessmann a écrit :
Bruno Desthuilliers wrote:
>>aa*****@gmail.com a écrit :

>>>The problem is '2' != 2

It would indeed be a problem if this expression eval'd to True.
That's the case in some, hem, 'languages', and believe me it's
*not* the RightThing.


What kind of "hem" language is this? :)
>
>>>>'2' != 2

True
hem... Sorry, I of course meant that it would be a problem if '2' == 2
eval'd to true - or '2' != 2 eval'd to false. My bad...

Thanks for the correction anyway.

Ah, and, yes, the 'hem' language I was thinking about has a three
letters recursive acronym for name and is widely (and mostly) used for
web applications. Should I spell the name, or did you guess ?-)
Dec 12 '07 #10
Ok people. No more discussions about this. I tought the conversion
occurs automatic but it is not case. I'm a newbie on python. Thanks to
everybody. ;-)

On 12 Dez, 19:43, Bruno Desthuilliers
<bdesth.quelquech...@free.quelquepart.frwrote:
Bjoern Schliessmann a écrit :
Bruno Desthuilliers wrote:
>aara...@gmail.com a écrit :
>>The problem is '2' != 2
>It would indeed be a problem if this expression eval'd to True.
That's the case in some, hem, 'languages', and believe me it's
*not* the RightThing.
What kind of "hem" language is this? :)
>>>'2' != 2
True

hem... Sorry, I of course meant that it would be a problem if '2' == 2
eval'd to true - or '2' != 2 eval'd to false. My bad...

Thanks for the correction anyway.

Ah, and, yes, the 'hem' language I was thinking about has a three
letters recursive acronym for name and is widely (and mostly) used for
web applications. Should I spell the name, or did you guess ?-)
Dec 12 '07 #11
On Dec 11, 3:08 pm, aara...@gmail.com wrote:
On 11 Dez, 22:02, aara...@gmail.com wrote:
Ok. This is small code.
The problem is '2' != 2 there is a way of converting 'some number' in
number ?
Thanks.
# -*- coding: cp1252 -*-
import random
import csv
import struct
import array
# resultados para colocar nos campos
def gera_string(res):
# acampo3
acampo1=((0,5,'muito reduzidos'),(6,20,'reduzidos'),
(21,32,'satisfatórios'),(33,40,'bons'),(41,45,'exc elentes'))
campo1=''
for a in acampo1:
print res[1]
if (res[1]>=a[0] and res[1]<=a[1]):
campo1=a[2]
return campo1
# processar
res=['a','2']
print gera_string(res)
quit()
On 11 Dez, 20:40, Bruno Desthuilliers
<bdesth.quelquech...@free.quelquepart.frwrote:
aara...@gmail.com a écrit :
Hi,

Thanks. I have found that there is int() function on python. The print
function always show me a number when was 'number'. Ok thanks.
Is the tuple comparison brooked in python ?!?!?
Given the size and average level of the user base, I think this would
have been noticed.
Try this
If you hope anyone to try anything, please post the *minimal* working
code showing the problem. And while your at it, also explain the
expected result.
and you will see funny things:
Sorry but the only thing I see so far is that your code needs refactoring.
Python objects have two ways of representing themselves. The print
statement converts the objects in it into strings. Python objects can
also have a representative string which should give you enough
information to determine if you're dealing with a number or a string.
You can get this representative string via the repr() built-in
function. To get the normal string of an object, the str() built-in
will perform the conversion.

If you're using the string formatting operator (%), the "%s" specifier
will use the normal string, while the "%r" specifier will use the
representative string.

Please note that repr() will show you *all* the digits of a floating
point number, while the normal string conversion may round. This is
because floating-point numbers cannot represent most decimal exactly.
This isn't a flaw in Python, but a flaw in all IEEE floating-point
hardware (ie, your processor).

If you're using Python interactively, Python will display the results
of expressions with their representative strings.

For example:
>>5
5
>>'5'
'5'
>>0.1
0.10000000000000001
>>print '5', 5
5 5
>>print repr('5'), repr(5)
'5' 5
>>print 'Normal Strings: %s, %s, %s' % ('5', 5, 0.1)
Normal Strings: 5, 5, 0.1
>>print 'Repr Strings: %r, %r, %r' % ('5', 5, 0.1)
Repr Strings: '5', 5, 0.10000000000000001
>>>
Dec 13 '07 #12

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