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Can you please give me some advice?

Hi there,

What is different between Ruby and Python? I am wondering what language
is really mine for work. Somebody tell me Ruby is clean or Python is
really easy! Anyway I will really make decision today what I have to
study from now on. What I make the decision is more difficult than to
know why I have to learn English. Yeah I do not like to learn English
because it is just very painful..

Can you please give me some advice?

Byung-Hee

Sep 30 '07 #1
14 1639
Byung-Hee HWANG wrote:
Hi there,

What is different between Ruby and Python? I am wondering what language
is really mine for work. Somebody tell me Ruby is clean or Python is
really easy! Anyway I will really make decision today what I have to
study from now on.
What kind of advice do you expect on a NG called comp.lang.PYTHON ?
What I make the decision is more difficult than to
know why I have to learn English. Yeah I do not like to learn English
because it is just very painful..
Then stop learning it ;)

ciao
--
morphine

Sep 30 '07 #2
On Sun, 30 Sep 2007 19:22:07 +0900, Byung-Hee HWANG wrote:
Hi there,

What is different between Ruby and Python? I am wondering what language
is really mine for work. Somebody tell me Ruby is clean or Python is
really easy! Anyway I will really make decision today what I have to
study from now on. What I make the decision is more difficult than to
know why I have to learn English. Yeah I do not like to learn English
because it is just very painful..

Can you please give me some advice?

Hello World in Ruby (and a few other languages):
http://www.oreillynet.com/ruby/blog/...llo_world.html

More here:
http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Program..._Ruby_programs

Hello World in Python:
http://python.about.com/od/gettingst...helloworld.htm

A Python tutorial:
http://docs.python.org/tut/
Sorry about the English.

--
Steven
Sep 30 '07 #3
On Sun, 2007-09-30 at 12:33 +0200, morphine wrote:
Byung-Hee HWANG wrote:
Hi there,

What is different between Ruby and Python? I am wondering what language
is really mine for work. Somebody tell me Ruby is clean or Python is
really easy! Anyway I will really make decision today what I have to
study from now on.

What kind of advice do you expect on a NG called comp.lang.PYTHON ?
^^^^^^^^
Your advice is the best.. really it hit my head very strongly..
>
What I make the decision is more difficult than to
know why I have to learn English. Yeah I do not like to learn English
because it is just very painful..

Then stop learning it ;)
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
You are bad.. I'm really pain..

sorry for noise.. but I really wanted to say about the above matters..
Sep 30 '07 #4
On Sun, 2007-09-30 at 10:36 +0000, Steven D'Aprano wrote:
[...snip...]
Sorry about the English.
That's alright. I am always struggling against English. It is not
strange now. Thank you for your kindness.

Byung-Hee

Sep 30 '07 #5
On Sep 30, 6:22 am, Byung-Hee HWANG <b...@izb.knu.ac.krwrote:
Hi there,

What is different between Ruby and Python? I am wondering what language
is really mine for work. Somebody tell me Ruby is clean or Python is
really easy! Anyway I will really make decision today what I have to
study from now on. What I make the decision is more difficult than to
know why I have to learn English. Yeah I do not like to learn English
because it is just very painful..

Can you please give me some advice?

Byung-Hee

"Dive into Python" has been translated in Chinese:
http://www.woodpecker.org.cn/diveintopython/

Hope it helps,
George

Sep 30 '07 #6
Hello World in Ruby (and a few other languages):http://www.oreillynet.com/ruby/blog/...llo_world.html
Hello World in Python:http://python.about.com/od/gettingst...helloworld.htm
I know nothing of Ruby, but just the fact that in Ruby the Hello World
program is

puts 'Hello, World!'

whereas the Python Hello World program is

print 'Hello, World!'

suggests to me that Python is more intuitive because the word "print"
has a meaning in English that makes sense given what you want to do,
but "puts" just doesn't. And, as someone who has been learning Python
from almost no knowledge of programming, I've found it is not too bad
in trying to keep as reasonably close to a natural language like
English
as possible.

I also think the mandatory indenting of Python is helpful in forcing
new programmers to be neat and see code blocks quickly. Plus I doubt
the Ruby community has such a large group of helpful people and
libraries
and such (but I could be wrong about that, just assuming it based on
the
fact that Python has been around longer).

On the other hand, perhaps because Ruby is newer it has been able to
freshly start with advantages learned from the difficulties of other
languages. Byung-Hee Hwang ought to go the Ruby group and see what
they are saying.

As far as English goes, Byung-Hee, you have to admit English grammar
is easy (though spelling is not so easy). That anyone can speak and
write Chinese is impressive to me, as the language looks completely
impossible! Good luck!
Sep 30 '07 #7
On Sun, 2007-09-30 at 17:27 +0000, cm******@gmail.com wrote:
I know nothing of Ruby, but just the fact that in Ruby the Hello World
program is

puts 'Hello, World!'

whereas the Python Hello World program is

print 'Hello, World!'

suggests to me that Python is more intuitive because the word "print"
has a meaning in English that makes sense given what you want to do,
but "puts" just doesn't. And, as someone who has been learning Python
from almost no knowledge of programming, I've found it is not too bad
in trying to keep as reasonably close to a natural language like
English
as possible.

I also think the mandatory indenting of Python is helpful in forcing
new programmers to be neat and see code blocks quickly. Plus I doubt
the Ruby community has such a large group of helpful people and
libraries
and such (but I could be wrong about that, just assuming it based on
the
fact that Python has been around longer).

On the other hand, perhaps because Ruby is newer it has been able to
freshly start with advantages learned from the difficulties of other
languages. Byung-Hee Hwang ought to go the Ruby group and see what
they are saying.

As far as English goes, Byung-Hee, you have to admit English grammar
is easy (though spelling is not so easy). That anyone can speak and
write Chinese is impressive to me, as the language looks completely
impossible! Good luck!
I read above your comments all. It will be good reason for my decision
must be Python. Anyway, your guidance has been useful and is greatly
appreciated. Okay, I will study English very hardly, as well. Thanks,
again!

Byung-Hee
Sep 30 '07 #8
cm******@gmail.com wrote:
>Hello World in Ruby (and a few other languages):http://www.oreillynet.com/ruby/blog/...llo_world.html
>Hello World in Python:http://python.about.com/od/gettingst...helloworld.htm

I know nothing of Ruby, but just the fact that in Ruby the Hello World
program is

puts 'Hello, World!'

whereas the Python Hello World program is

print 'Hello, World!'

suggests to me that Python is more intuitive because the word "print"
has a meaning in English that makes sense given what you want to do,
but "puts" just doesn't. And, as someone who has been learning Python
from almost no knowledge of programming, I've found it is not too bad
in trying to keep as reasonably close to a natural language like
English
as possible.

I also think the mandatory indenting of Python is helpful in forcing
new programmers to be neat and see code blocks quickly. Plus I doubt
the Ruby community has such a large group of helpful people and
libraries
and such (but I could be wrong about that, just assuming it based on
the
fact that Python has been around longer).

On the other hand, perhaps because Ruby is newer it has been able to
freshly start with advantages learned from the difficulties of other
languages. Byung-Hee Hwang ought to go the Ruby group and see what
they are saying.

As far as English goes, Byung-Hee, you have to admit English grammar
is easy (though spelling is not so easy). That anyone can speak and
write Chinese is impressive to me, as the language looks completely
impossible! Good luck!

Errhhh..... guys...... I think .kr means Korea.... so he would speak
Korean, not Chinese
Sep 30 '07 #9
On Sep 30, 2:54 pm, Ricardo Aráoz <ricar...@gmail.comwrote:
>
Errhhh..... guys...... I think .kr means Korea.... so he would speak
Korean, not Chinese
In this case, http://kr.diveintopython.org/html/index.htm might be
more useful ;-)

George

Sep 30 '07 #10
cm******@gmail.com a écrit :
(snip)
I know nothing of Ruby, but just the fact that in Ruby the Hello World
program is

puts 'Hello, World!'

whereas the Python Hello World program is

print 'Hello, World!'

suggests to me that Python is more intuitive because the word "print"
has a meaning in English that makes sense given what you want to do,
but "puts" just doesn't.
Hem.... Sorry, but it reminds me of the most clueless comments on Python
I've seen on c.l.ruby. I really don't think Python is more or less
"intuitive" than Ruby, and making a judgement on such a pointless detail
is not even worth the bandswith IMHO. FWIW, 'puts' means 'put string'
(implied : on stdout), which is certainly much more semantically correct
than what 'print' implies. When stdout is redirected to a socket that
send bytes to a client program - like, say, a browser -, you're
certainly not "printing" anything.

Anyway, at this level, Python and Ruby are surprisingly close to each
other.
And, as someone who has been learning Python
from almost no knowledge of programming, I've found it is not too bad
in trying to keep as reasonably close to a natural language like
English
as possible.
Here again, Ruby claims (or at least some rubyists do) that Ruby is as
close as possible to "natural language". With examples like:

5.times do {
something
and_something_else
}

which is arguably more "intuitive" than:

for i in range(5):
do_something()
and_something_else()

I also think the mandatory indenting of Python is helpful in forcing
new programmers to be neat and see code blocks quickly. Plus I doubt
the Ruby community has such a large group of helpful people
While perhaps smaller, the Ruby community is (AFAICT) known for being
very active and helpful.
and
libraries
and such (but I could be wrong about that, just assuming it based on
the
fact that Python has been around longer).
On this last point at least, you're probably right !-)
On the other hand, perhaps because Ruby is newer it has been able to
freshly start with advantages learned from the difficulties of other
languages. Byung-Hee Hwang ought to go the Ruby group and see what
they are saying.
Indeed. Or even better, try both languages and find out which one he
likes best. Implementation and 3rd part libs set aside, I could not say
one is better than the other, so it's mostly a matter of personal taste
and affinities.
As far as English goes, Byung-Hee, you have to admit English grammar
is easy
Would you say French is easy ? Because as far as I'm concerned, I find
it the easiest language ever. Could it be because I'm french ?-)

(snip)
Sep 30 '07 #11
cm******@gmail.com wrote:
And, as someone who has been learning Python from almost no
knowledge of programming, I've found it is not too bad in trying
to keep as reasonably close to a natural language like English
as possible.
Sure, your next project should be learning COBOL -- it must be
*very* intuitive.
On the other hand, perhaps because Ruby is newer it has been able
to freshly start with advantages learned from the difficulties of
other languages.
What are those advantages in respect to Python?

Regards,
Björn

--
BOFH excuse #4:

static from nylon underwear

Sep 30 '07 #12
Byung-Hee HWANG <bh@izb.knu.ac.krwrote:
Hi there,

What is different between Ruby and Python?
Not all that much; Python is more mature, Ruby more fashionable.

I am wondering what language
is really mine for work. Somebody tell me Ruby is clean or Python is
really easy! Anyway I will really make decision today what I have to
study from now on. What I make the decision is more difficult than to
know why I have to learn English. Yeah I do not like to learn English
because it is just very painful..
www.python.or.kr/
http://wiki.python.org/moin/KoreanPythonBooks
Alex
Oct 1 '07 #13
* Bruno Desthuilliers (Sat, 29 Sep 2007 19:17:43 +0200)
cm******@gmail.com a écrit :
(snip)
I know nothing of Ruby, but just the fact that in Ruby the Hello World
program is

puts 'Hello, World!'

whereas the Python Hello World program is

print 'Hello, World!'

suggests to me that Python is more intuitive because the word "print"
has a meaning in English that makes sense given what you want to do,
but "puts" just doesn't.

Hem.... Sorry, but it reminds me of the most clueless comments on Python
I've seen on c.l.ruby. I really don't think Python is more or less
"intuitive" than Ruby, and making a judgement on such a pointless detail
is not even worth the bandswith IMHO. FWIW, 'puts' means 'put string'
(implied : on stdout), which is certainly much more semantically correct
than what 'print' implies.
You missed the point. "puts" for printing something to stdout is
definitely a bad name for this operation. I mean "put string" (even
abbreviated) what does that mean?

On the other hand it does not mean that Python ist more intuitive than
Ruby - only the printing to stdout is more intuitive.
Oct 2 '07 #14
Thorsten Kampe a écrit :
* Bruno Desthuilliers (Sat, 29 Sep 2007 19:17:43 +0200)
>>cm******@gmail.com a écrit :
(snip)
>>>I know nothing of Ruby, but just the fact that in Ruby the Hello World
program is

puts 'Hello, World!'

whereas the Python Hello World program is

print 'Hello, World!'

suggests to me that Python is more intuitive because the word "print"
has a meaning in English that makes sense given what you want to do,
but "puts" just doesn't.

Hem.... Sorry, but it reminds me of the most clueless comments on Python
I've seen on c.l.ruby. I really don't think Python is more or less
"intuitive" than Ruby, and making a judgement on such a pointless detail
is not even worth the bandswith IMHO. FWIW, 'puts' means 'put string'
(implied : on stdout), which is certainly much more semantically correct
than what 'print' implies.


You missed the point.
Your opinion.
"puts" for printing something to stdout
<MHO>
It's not "printing". To me, "printing" implies a printer and a piece of
paper (or other appropriate support). It's sending bytes to some kind of
cs abstraction known as a "stream".
</MHO>

But anyway... This is certainly enough to prove that "intuitive" is a
*very* subjective qualifier.
Oct 2 '07 #15

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