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Python is overtaking Perl

Ben
Here are the statistics from Google Trends:

http://benyang22a.blogspot.com/2007/...vs-python.html

Sep 4 '07 #1
11 1509
On Tue, 04 Sep 2007 00:32:23 -0000
Ben <be*******@gmail.comwrote:
Here are the statistics from Google Trends:

http://benyang22a.blogspot.com/2007/...vs-python.html
This chart is showing that amount of python programers is smaller every
year :(
Sep 4 '07 #2
On Sep 4, 10:49 am, Sulsa <su...@gazeta.plwrote:
On Tue, 04 Sep 2007 00:32:23 -0000

Ben <benyan...@gmail.comwrote:
Here are the statistics from Google Trends:
http://benyang22a.blogspot.com/2007/...vs-python.html

This chart is showing that amount of python programers is smaller every
year :(
How do you figure that? Isn't the chart showing the frequency of
those particular terms combined as a fraction of the total search
volume on Google?

Sep 4 '07 #3
Asun Friere wrote:
How do you figure that? Isn't the chart showing the frequency of
those particular terms combined as a fraction of the total search
volume on Google?
Who knows? The graph has no labeling or calibration for the y-axis, so
it's meaningless.

--
Erik Max Francis && ma*@alcyone.com && http://www.alcyone.com/max/
San Jose, CA, USA && 37 20 N 121 53 W && AIM, Y!M erikmaxfrancis
However much you knock at nature's door, she will never answer you in
comprehensible words. -- Ivan Turgenev, 1860
Sep 4 '07 #4
I believe that the time-trend chart show the normalized volumes,
relative to the total Google search volume, so a decreasing trend
doesn't mean a decreasing absolute volume. The trends of "Los
Angeles", "China" searches are decreasing over the last three years,
but the absolute volumes should not be (given the popularity of Google
and the rise of China).

Sulsa wrote:
On Tue, 04 Sep 2007 00:32:23 -0000
Ben <be*******@gmail.comwrote:
Here are the statistics from Google Trends:

http://benyang22a.blogspot.com/2007/...vs-python.html

This chart is showing that amount of python programers is smaller every
year :(
Sep 4 '07 #5
On Sep 4, 11:49 am, Erik Max Francis <m...@alcyone.comwrote:
Who knows? The graph has no labeling or calibration for the y-axis, so
it's meaningless.
Well yes, some calibration would make it more meaningful, but it is at
least labeled 'Search Volume.' What's worse the calibration changes
with any search you do (try 'java programming, python programming').
In any case this is how Google describe what they are doing.

|Google Trends analyzes a portion of Google web searches to compute
how many
|searches have been done for the terms you enter, relative to the
total number
|of searches done on Google over time. We then show you a graph with
the
|results -- our search-volume graph -- plotted on a linear scale.

So I think we can at least say from the chart that searches combining
the terms 'python' and 'programming' have been falling, by some
unquantifiable amount (it don't _look_ like much!?), relative to the
number of total searches. I think we can also say that nothing in the
chart implies that the "amount of python programers is smaller every
year."
Sep 4 '07 #6
This chart is showing that amount of python programers is smaller every
year :(
I saw an article maybe a year ago, regarding "best careers" that
completely contradicted previous articles I had seen in years gone by.
It said that the number of people in programming and related jobs
would decline in future decades.
Sep 4 '07 #7
On Sep 4, 8:35 am, Jean-Paul Calderone <exar...@divmod.comwrote:
On Tue, 04 Sep 2007 00:32:23 -0000, Ben <benyan...@gmail.comwrote:
Here are the statistics from Google Trends:
http://benyang22a.blogspot.com/2007/...vs-python.html
From the graph, it seems more accurate to say that Perl is undertaking Python.

Jean-Paul
And to make it even more accurate, "Perl is undertaking Python in
India", since that's where the difference in favor of Python comes
from.

George

Sep 4 '07 #8
George Sakkis wrote:
On Sep 4, 8:35 am, Jean-Paul Calderone <exar...@divmod.comwrote:
>On Tue, 04 Sep 2007 00:32:23 -0000, Ben <benyan...@gmail.com>
wrote:
>Here are the statistics from Google Trends:
>http://benyang22a.blogspot.com/2007/...vs-python.html
>From the graph, it seems more accurate to say that Perl is
undertaking Python.

Jean-Paul

And to make it even more accurate, "Perl is undertaking Python in
India", since that's where the difference in favor of Python comes
from.
No, it's the other way around. The big difference in India is in
favor of Perl.

--
--OKB (not okblacke)
Brendan Barnwell
"Do not follow where the path may lead. Go, instead, where there is
no path, and leave a trail."
--author unknown
Sep 4 '07 #9
>So, all the decline means is that the number of searches
for "Python programming" releative to all searches done is declining.
Which makes sense. There are an many python tutorial/code snippet
sites, sites that list those type of python sites, as well as the
python.org site which means that a Google search is becoming less and
less necessary. I think the language is gaining more people because
it's an excellent language and don't really care what rank it has.

Sep 4 '07 #10

The expression "faint praise" comes to mind.
--
--Bryan
Sep 5 '07 #11
On Sep 4, 1:53 pm, "OKB (not okblacke)"
<brenNOSPAMb...@NObrenSPAMbarn.netwrote:
George Sakkis wrote:
On Sep 4, 8:35 am, Jean-Paul Calderone <exar...@divmod.comwrote:
On Tue, 04 Sep 2007 00:32:23 -0000, Ben <benyan...@gmail.com>
wrote:
Here are the statistics from Google Trends:
http://benyang22a.blogspot.com/2007/...vs-python.html
From the graph, it seems more accurate to say that Perl is
undertaking Python.
Jean-Paul
And to make it even more accurate, "Perl is undertaking Python in
India", since that's where the difference in favor of Python comes
from.

No, it's the other way around. The big difference in India is in
favor of Perl.

I guess India is a big leader in perl coz all the decades old perl
scripts are maintained in India.
US Corporations have outsourced fixing/changing 80s-90s perl code to
India.

Sep 6 '07 #12

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