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Want to learn Python

P: n/a
Hi, I want to learn Python in less than a month which resources should
I use. I prefer to read books . Please give me a list of *recognized*
resources. Thank You all

Jun 15 '07 #1
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18 Replies


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On Jun 15, 4:41 pm, Amol <amolj.1...@gmail.comwrote:
Hi, I want to learn Python in less than a month which resources should
I use. I prefer to read books . Please give me a list of *recognized*
resources. Thank You all
http://python.org/doc/

JItendra Nair

Jun 15 '07 #2

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Amol a écrit :
Hi, I want to learn Python in less than a month which resources should
I use.
Your brain ?-)

(actually, a computer with Python installed on it may help too...)
I prefer to read books .
Books are fine, but won't be of much help unless you actually *code* in
Python.
Please give me a list of *recognized*
resources.
http://wiki.python.org/moin/IntroductoryBooks
=I'd recommand Mark Lutz's books and/or Mark Pilgrim's Dive Into Python

http://wiki.python.org/moin/AdvancedBooks
=the Python CookBook
Jun 15 '07 #3

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On Jun 15, 7:41 am, Amol <amolj.1...@gmail.comwrote:
Hi, I want to learn Python in less than a month which resources should
I use. I prefer to read books . Please give me a list of *recognized*
resources. Thank You all
I started here: http://docs.python.org/tut/tut.html

Jun 15 '07 #4

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I am still learning and this is a great resource:
http://diveintopython.org/index.html

You can buy it or read it online for free.
Jun 15 '07 #5

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On 6/15/07, Amol <am********@gmail.comwrote:
Hi, I want to learn Python in less than a month which resources should
I use. I prefer to read books . Please give me a list of *recognized*
resources. Thank You all
One other invaluable resource: http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/tutor

Cheers,
Simon B.
si***@brunningonline.net
http://www.brunningonline.net/simon/blog/
GTalk: simon.brunning | MSN: small_values | Yahoo: smallvalues
Jun 15 '07 #6

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On 6/15/07, Amol <am********@gmail.comwrote:
Hi, I want to learn Python in less than a month which resources should
I use. I prefer to read books . Please give me a list of *recognized*
resources. Thank You all
The Apress "Beginning Python" book is the one that I recommend to
people who want to learn the language. I started off with the O'Reilly
book, and that book went too slow and didn't cover as many topic as
the Apress book. If you are an experienced programmer and use the
Apress book, you'll get a pretty good grasp of the language within a
week or so.

--
Evan Klitzke <ev**@yelp.com>
Jun 15 '07 #7

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Amol wrote:
Hi, I want to learn Python in less than a month which resources should
I use. I prefer to read books . Please give me a list of *recognized*
resources. Thank You all
This is an excellent resource:
http://rgruet.free.fr/PQR24/PQR2.4.html

Although it's quite different from a book, I must admit.

Cheers,
Christof

Jun 15 '07 #8

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On Jun 15, 11:59 am, "Evan Klitzke" <e...@yelp.comwrote:
On 6/15/07, Amol <amolj.1...@gmail.comwrote:
Hi, I want to learn Python in less than a month which resources should
I use. I prefer to read books . Please give me a list of *recognized*
resources. Thank You all

The Apress "Beginning Python" book is the one that I recommend to
people who want to learn the language. I started off with the O'Reilly
book, and that book went too slow and didn't cover as many topic as
the Apress book. If you are an experienced programmer and use the
Apress book, you'll get a pretty good grasp of the language within a
week or so.

--
Evan Klitzke <e...@yelp.com>
I am of the opposite opinion: I recommend that people get any book but
"Beginning Python: Novice to Professional". In my opinion, that book
is horribly written, the examples are terrible, some subjects are only
covered in passing so the info is too parse to be of any use, and
there are no problems at the end of the chapters to work on. I think
a beginner might be fooled into thinking Beginning Python is a good
book because they won't know how many holes their knowledge of python
is riddled with, and since there are no problems to work on, they may
not even realize how little they learned. I think an experienced
programmer would spot all the blunders in the book straight away.

As a result, I often use "Learning Python" as a reference to fill in
all the missing material in Beginning Python, and I wish I had
purchased it initially. It also has problems to work on at the end of
each section. One problem with Learning Python is that it needs a new
edition to catch up with the changes that have occurred in the
language, but it still seems like a much, much better book than
Beginning Python.

The reference book "Python in a Nutshell" is excellent, however its
index is so bad I hesitate to recommend it. A reference book should
have a thorough index--you shouldn't have to hunt through the chapters
trying to find the particular topic you are interested in.

Jun 15 '07 #9

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Amol <am********@gmail.comwrote in news:1181907696.878873.214760
@i13g2000prf.googlegroups.com:
Hi, I want to learn Python in less than a month which resources should
I use. I prefer to read books . Please give me a list of *recognized*
resources. Thank You all
http://www.pythonware.com/daily/4368043588838810608/

Jack Crane
Jun 16 '07 #10

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On Jun 15, 6:41 am, Amol <amolj.1...@gmail.comwrote:
Hi, I want to learn Python in less than a month which resources should
I use. I prefer to read books . Please give me a list of *recognized*
resources. Thank You all
Python Essential Reference, David Beazley, 3rd edition Feb 2006
great, esp. if you already know some other programming language

http://www.amazon.com/Python-Essenti...623/inscape-20

rd

Jun 16 '07 #11

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7stud <bb**********@yahoo.comwrote:
...
The reference book "Python in a Nutshell" is excellent, however its
index is so bad I hesitate to recommend it. A reference book should
have a thorough index--you shouldn't have to hunt through the chapters
trying to find the particular topic you are interested in.
Try <http://books.google.com/advanced_book_search-- it will easily
generate for you queries on books.google.com such as, e.g.:
generator inauthor:"alex martelli"
to find 3 mentions of "generator" in the Nutshell and Cookbook. Not
quite a replacement for a good index, of course (you're welcome to write
O'Reilly spewing hate on how much you loathe that index - maybe that
will help convince them to put more time and effort into indexing on
their future projects, or offer some way for book authors to add
indexing indications as they write their books), but it still seems
potentially helpful.
Alex
Jun 16 '07 #12

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In article <11**********************@c77g2000hse.googlegroups .com>,
7stud <bb**********@yahoo.comwrote:
>
I am of the opposite opinion: I recommend that people get any book but
"Beginning Python: Novice to Professional". In my opinion, that book
is horribly written, the examples are terrible, some subjects are only
covered in passing so the info is too parse to be of any use, and
there are no problems at the end of the chapters to work on. I think
a beginner might be fooled into thinking Beginning Python is a good
book because they won't know how many holes their knowledge of python
is riddled with, and since there are no problems to work on, they may
not even realize how little they learned. I think an experienced
programmer would spot all the blunders in the book straight away.
I'm curious, have you tried _Python for Dummies_? I don't want to be
shilling my own book -- but I'd also like to know how it stacks up.
--
Aahz (aa**@pythoncraft.com) <* http://www.pythoncraft.com/

"as long as we like the same operating system, things are cool." --piranha
Jun 16 '07 #13

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In article <1h**************************@mac.com>,
Alex Martelli <al***@mac.comwrote:
>7stud <bb**********@yahoo.comwrote:
>>
The reference book "Python in a Nutshell" is excellent, however its
index is so bad I hesitate to recommend it. A reference book should
have a thorough index--you shouldn't have to hunt through the chapters
trying to find the particular topic you are interested in.

Try <http://books.google.com/advanced_book_search-- it will easily
generate for you queries on books.google.com such as, e.g.:
generator inauthor:"alex martelli"
to find 3 mentions of "generator" in the Nutshell and Cookbook. Not
quite a replacement for a good index, of course (you're welcome to write
O'Reilly spewing hate on how much you loathe that index - maybe that
will help convince them to put more time and effort into indexing on
their future projects, or offer some way for book authors to add
indexing indications as they write their books), but it still seems
potentially helpful.
We didn't wait for Wiley to offer, we simply insisted on providing a
list of index terms. That's why _Python for Dummies_ includes "genexp"
in addition to "generator", and also why we have separate entries for
"{} dict literal", "braces ({}) dict literal", and "curly braces ({})
dict literal". ;-)
--
Aahz (aa**@pythoncraft.com) <* http://www.pythoncraft.com/

"as long as we like the same operating system, things are cool." --piranha
Jun 16 '07 #14

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I'm curious, have you tried _Python for Dummies_?

No, I haven't. Unfortunately, I don't ever consider Dummies books.
That type of marketing appeals to certain people and not others. I'm
one of the others. I'll definitely take a look at it the next time
I'm in the bookstore.
>We didn't wait for Wiley to offer, we simply insisted on providing a
list of index terms.
It's nice to hear about an author who cares enough about the end
product that bears their name to insist on quality. I'm so tired of
hearing authors whine that the publisher screwed up the book.

Jun 16 '07 #15

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In article <11**********************@c77g2000hse.googlegroups .com>,
7stud <bb**********@yahoo.comwrote:
>
It's nice to hear about an author who cares enough about the end
product that bears their name to insist on quality. I'm so tired of
hearing authors whine that the publisher screwed up the book.
In all fairness, my co-author and primary partner (Stef Maruch) is a
technical writer and editor as a profession, and she used to work at
Yale Press. So we had more expertise on hand for knowing how to deal
with publishers. Like law and sausages, the publishing industry does
not bear close examination, and yes, if an author does not know what to
expect, it's easy to get a book screwed up.

For that matter, even when you *do* know what to expect, books still get
screwed up, though that happens more in fiction publishing (go look in
rec.arts.sf.composition for some horror stories written by experienced
multi-book authors).

On the gripping hand, I've tech edited three or four other Python books,
and several of them were clearly written by people who didn't know Python
and didn't want to learn enough to write a book about it. And they
ignored my edits. (This seems like another opportunity to thank our tech
editor, David Goodger.) So your larger point about careless authors is
essentially correct.
--
Aahz (aa**@pythoncraft.com) <* http://www.pythoncraft.com/

"as long as we like the same operating system, things are cool." --piranha
Jun 16 '07 #16

P: n/a
7stud <bb**********@yahoo.comwrote:
I'm curious, have you tried _Python for Dummies_?

No, I haven't. Unfortunately, I don't ever consider Dummies books.
That type of marketing appeals to certain people and not others. I'm
one of the others. I'll definitely take a look at it the next time
I'm in the bookstore.
Aahz's book is really good, in my opinion. So are many others in the
"for Dummies" series that I've had occasion to try (including the one
with the delightfully unintended pun in its title, "Bridge for Dummies":
despite the title it applies to declarers and defenders just as well:-).
Judging a book by its cover (and, by extension, by how its publisher
markets a series) is the proverbial epitome of superficiality.

We didn't wait for Wiley to offer, we simply insisted on providing a
list of index terms.

It's nice to hear about an author who cares enough about the end
product that bears their name to insist on quality. I'm so tired of
hearing authors whine that the publisher screwed up the book.
Oh, I'm SO awfully sorry to add to your tiredness! But the "whining"
that so saps your energy is a simple statement of fact, at least in my
case -- my publisher just didn't allow me sensible options for providing
the index myself. Oh, I could have "provided a list of index terms",
separate and floating in a vacuum (but "genexps" is in the index anyway,
as is "generator expressions":-), but there was no way I could do it
_right_, simply tying each index term to all the pages/page-ranges it
should point to by including suitable tags in my manuscript. I won't
tire you further with a tirade about my unpleasant tools experiences
with both the Cookbook and the Nutshell, but they're a good part of
what's holding me back from writing another book with the same publisher
(including a third edition of either).

I believe (and it seems the generally good reviews of the book support
me in this) that the Python community is better off with a Nutshell with
an imperfect index than it would be with no Nutshell at all, which would
likely be the case if I had "insisted on quality" as you apparently
would have preferred.
Alex
Jun 17 '07 #17

P: n/a
Dennis Lee Bieber <wl*****@ix.netcom.comwrites:
Aahz's book is really good, in my opinion. So are many others in the
"for Dummies" series that I've had occasion to try (including the one
with the delightfully unintended pun in its title, "Bridge for Dummies":
despite the title it applies to declarers and defenders just as well:-).
Judging a book by its cover (and, by extension, by how its publisher
markets a series) is the proverbial epitome of superficiality.
The first edition "Wicca for Dummies" had a few laughs too...
Biggest one is that someone inserted a photo of the "Venus de Milo"
where the text called for the "Venus of Willendorf".
I wonder if they had a series about automotive safety engineering,
with a volume called "crash testing for dummies".
Jun 17 '07 #18

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In article <7x************@ruckus.brouhaha.com>,
Paul Rubin <http://ph****@NOSPAM.invalidwrote:
>Dennis Lee Bieber <wl*****@ix.netcom.comwrites:
>>
The first edition "Wicca for Dummies" had a few laughs too...
Biggest one is that someone inserted a photo of the "Venus de Milo"
where the text called for the "Venus of Willendorf".

I wonder if they had a series about automotive safety engineering,
with a volume called "crash testing for dummies".
Dunno, but the real howlers IMO have been: Customer Service for Dummies,
Borland C++ for Dummies, and IBS for Dummies.
--
Aahz (aa**@pythoncraft.com) <* http://www.pythoncraft.com/

"as long as we like the same operating system, things are cool." --piranha
Jun 17 '07 #19

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