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Examples of high-quality python code?

Hey everyone, I'm relatively new to python - I actually picked it up
to see how quickly I could start building non-trivial apps with it.

Needless to say, I was quite pleased.

Anyhow, I'm looking to expand my understanding of python, and I feel
that one of the best ways to do that is looking at other peoples code.

Unfortunately, I don't feel like I grok the python mindset quite well
enough to fully distinguish between awesome, average, and not-pythony
code, so I was hoping some of the more experienced python people could
point me to some (preferably FOSS) non-trivial apps written in python
that are examples of great python code.

I realize this may be a bit ambiguous - basically I don't want to go
randomly downloading other people's source and end up assimilating
techniques that aren't . . . well . . . pythonistic.

So, who wants to hook me up?
May 31 '07 #1
3 1909
kaens wrote:
Hey everyone, I'm relatively new to python - I actually picked it up
to see how quickly I could start building non-trivial apps with it.

Needless to say, I was quite pleased.

Anyhow, I'm looking to expand my understanding of python, and I feel
that one of the best ways to do that is looking at other peoples code.

Unfortunately, I don't feel like I grok the python mindset quite well
enough to fully distinguish between awesome, average, and not-pythony
code, so I was hoping some of the more experienced python people could
point me to some (preferably FOSS) non-trivial apps written in python
that are examples of great python code.

I realize this may be a bit ambiguous - basically I don't want to go
randomly downloading other people's source and end up assimilating
techniques that aren't . . . well . . . pythonistic.

So, who wants to hook me up?
You should consider picking up a copy of Python Cookbook. Alex and
others have reviewed the code it contains and IMHO it is well written.

I've also learned quite a lot from:

Python on Win32 (book by Mark Hammond/Andy Robinson)
Reading source code to standard library
Reading ReportLab source (www.reportlab.org)
Reading PIL source (www.effbot.org)
Reading wxPython source (www.wxpython.org)
Monitoring this list on a daily basis

-Larry

May 31 '07 #2
On May 31, 8:38 am, Larry Bates <larry.ba...@websafe.comwrote:
kaens wrote:
Hey everyone, I'm relatively new to python - I actually picked it up
to see how quickly I could start building non-trivial apps with it.
Needless to say, I was quite pleased.
Anyhow, I'm looking to expand my understanding of python, and I feel
that one of the best ways to do that is looking at other peoples code.
Unfortunately, I don't feel like I grok the python mindset quite well
enough to fully distinguish between awesome, average, and not-pythony
code, so I was hoping some of the more experienced python people could
point me to some (preferably FOSS) non-trivial apps written in python
that are examples of great python code.
I realize this may be a bit ambiguous - basically I don't want to go
randomly downloading other people's source and end up assimilating
techniques that aren't . . . well . . . pythonistic.
So, who wants to hook me up?

You should consider picking up a copy of Python Cookbook. Alex and
others have reviewed the code it contains and IMHO it is well written.

I've also learned quite a lot from:

Python on Win32 (book by Mark Hammond/Andy Robinson)
Reading source code to standard library
Reading ReportLab source (www.reportlab.org)
Reading PIL source (www.effbot.org)
Reading wxPython source (www.wxpython.org)
Monitoring this list on a daily basis

-Larry
Also "Python Programming" by Lutz has some great code to learn from as
it also explains most of it.

Mike

May 31 '07 #3
On 31 May 2007 06:58:36 -0700, ky******@gmail.com <ky******@gmail.comwrote:
On May 31, 8:38 am, Larry Bates <larry.ba...@websafe.comwrote:
kaens wrote:
Hey everyone, I'm relatively new to python - I actually picked it up
to see how quickly I could start building non-trivial apps with it.
Needless to say, I was quite pleased.
Anyhow, I'm looking to expand my understanding of python, and I feel
that one of the best ways to do that is looking at other peoples code.
Unfortunately, I don't feel like I grok the python mindset quite well
enough to fully distinguish between awesome, average, and not-pythony
code, so I was hoping some of the more experienced python people could
point me to some (preferably FOSS) non-trivial apps written in python
that are examples of great python code.
I realize this may be a bit ambiguous - basically I don't want to go
randomly downloading other people's source and end up assimilating
techniques that aren't . . . well . . . pythonistic.
So, who wants to hook me up?
You should consider picking up a copy of Python Cookbook. Alex and
others have reviewed the code it contains and IMHO it is well written.

I've also learned quite a lot from:

Python on Win32 (book by Mark Hammond/Andy Robinson)
Reading source code to standard library
Reading ReportLab source (www.reportlab.org)
Reading PIL source (www.effbot.org)
Reading wxPython source (www.wxpython.org)
Monitoring this list on a daily basis

-Larry

Also "Python Programming" by Lutz has some great code to learn from as
it also explains most of it.

Mike

--
http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list
Thanks for the replies everyone - I don't have the spare cash to buy a
book right now, but I've started studying the standard library, and I
do monitor this list on a regular basis.
Jun 2 '07 #4

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