By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
443,922 Members | 1,493 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 443,922 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

how to create/ref globals in an alternate namespace?

P: n/a
I have two seperate modules doing factory stuff which each have the
similar function2:

In the ds101 module,
def DS101CLASS(mname,data):
cname = mname+'DS101'
msg_class = globals()[cname]
msg = msg_class(data)
return msg

and in the fdu module,

def FDUCLASS(mname,data):
cname = mname+'FDU'
msg_class = globals()[cname]
msg = msg_class(data)
return msg

I was thinking I'd be clever and create a common function:
def procCLASS(mname, objname, data):
cname = mname+objname
msg_class = globals()[cname]
msg = msg_class(data)
return msg

but the call to globals fouls it all up. Is there a way to write it so
that the call to globals can be parameterized to be in the context of a
specific module?

Also, I need to go the other way, a la,
globals()[name] = nclass

Is this doable?

TIA

--
Time flies like the wind. Fruit flies like a banana. Stranger things have .0.
happened but none stranger than this. Does your driver's license say Organ ..0
Donor?Black holes are where God divided by zero. Listen to me! We are all- 000
individuals! What if this weren't a hypothetical question?
steveo at syslang.net
Apr 27 '07 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
5 Replies


P: n/a
Steven W. Orr wrote:
I have two seperate modules doing factory stuff which each have the
similar function2:

In the ds101 module, def DS101CLASS(mname,data):
cname = mname+'DS101'
msg_class = globals()[cname]
msg = msg_class(data)
return msg

and in the fdu module,

def FDUCLASS(mname,data):
cname = mname+'FDU'
msg_class = globals()[cname]
msg = msg_class(data)
return msg

I was thinking I'd be clever and create a common function:
def procCLASS(mname, objname, data):
cname = mname+objname
msg_class = globals()[cname]
msg = msg_class(data)
return msg

but the call to globals fouls it all up. Is there a way to write it so
that the call to globals can be parameterized to be in the context of a
specific module?

Also, I need to go the other way, a la,
globals()[name] = nclass

Is this doable?

TIA
Why do you need all of the msg_class(es) global? Why not put them into a
module and import the module where you need them? This would be the
conventional way to avoid such problems.
Apr 27 '07 #2

P: n/a
On Friday, Apr 27th 2007 at 14:07 -0700, quoth James Stroud:

=>Steven W. Orr wrote:
=>I have two seperate modules doing factory stuff which each have the
=>similar function2:
=>>
=>In the ds101 module, def DS101CLASS(mname,data):
=> cname = mname+'DS101'
=> msg_class = globals()[cname]
=> msg = msg_class(data)
=> return msg
=>>
=>and in the fdu module,
=>>
=>def FDUCLASS(mname,data):
=> cname = mname+'FDU'
=> msg_class = globals()[cname]
=> msg = msg_class(data)
=> return msg
=>>
=>I was thinking I'd be clever and create a common function:
=>def procCLASS(mname, objname, data):
=> cname = mname+objname
=> msg_class = globals()[cname]
=> msg = msg_class(data)
=> return msg
=>>
=>but the call to globals fouls it all up. Is there a way to write it so
=>that the call to globals can be parameterized to be in the context of a
=>specific module?
=>>
=>Also, I need to go the other way, a la,
=> globals()[name] = nclass
=>>
=>Is this doable?
=>>
=>TIA
=>>
=>
=>Why do you need all of the msg_class(es) global? Why not put them into a
=>module and import the module where you need them? This would be the
=>conventional way to avoid such problems.

The idea is that DS101 is being called in a loop in the ds101 module to
create a lot of msg_classes. The same is true for the FDUCLASS function;
it creates a lot of classes in a loop.

In addition, I have two other functions, almost alike, in two seperate
modules (mdefs is a structure with all of the stuff needed to drive the
loops)

def __InitDS101Classes():
for m in mdefs:
mdef = mdefs[m]
name = mdefs[m]['name']+'DS101'
nclass = new.classobj(name,(DS101,),{})
nclass.mdef = mdef
nclass.mid = m
globals()[name] = nclass
def __InitFDUClasses():
for m in mdefs:
mdef = mdefs[m]
name = mdefs[m]['name']+'FDU'
nclass = new.classobj(name,(FDU,),{})
nclass.mdef = mdef
nclass.mid = m
globals()[name] = nclass

I'm trying to see if by being clever, I can factor out the common code of
the four different functions and still end up with what they create ending
up in the namespaces where they are intended to reside in. Does this make
sense or am I way off base?
--
Time flies like the wind. Fruit flies like a banana. Stranger things have .0.
happened but none stranger than this. Does your driver's license say Organ ..0
Donor?Black holes are where God divided by zero. Listen to me! We are all- 000
individuals! What if this weren't a hypothetical question?
steveo at syslang.net
Apr 27 '07 #3

P: n/a
On Apr 27, 2:33 pm, "Steven W. Orr" <ste...@syslang.netwrote:
On Friday, Apr 27th 2007 at 14:07 -0700, quoth James Stroud:
<snip>
>
I'm trying to see if by being clever, I can factor out the common code of
the four different functions and still end up with what they create ending
up in the namespaces where they are intended to reside in. Does this make
sense or am I way off base?
<snip>

You may be trying to get too clever.

If what you're trying to do is what I think you're trying to do, I
would suggest looking at how the logging module handles globals and
functions for an example.

Apr 27 '07 #4

P: n/a
Steven W. Orr wrote:
On Friday, Apr 27th 2007 at 14:07 -0700, quoth James Stroud:

=>Steven W. Orr wrote:
=>I have two seperate modules doing factory stuff which each have the
=>similar function2:
=>>
=>In the ds101 module, def DS101CLASS(mname,data):
=> cname = mname+'DS101'
=> msg_class = globals()[cname]
=> msg = msg_class(data)
=> return msg
=>>
=>and in the fdu module,
=>>
=>def FDUCLASS(mname,data):
=> cname = mname+'FDU'
=> msg_class = globals()[cname]
=> msg = msg_class(data)
=> return msg
=>>
=>I was thinking I'd be clever and create a common function:
=>def procCLASS(mname, objname, data):
=> cname = mname+objname
=> msg_class = globals()[cname]
=> msg = msg_class(data)
=> return msg
=>>
=>but the call to globals fouls it all up. Is there a way to write it so
=>that the call to globals can be parameterized to be in the context of a
=>specific module?
=>>
=>Also, I need to go the other way, a la,
=> globals()[name] = nclass
=>>
=>Is this doable?
=>>
=>TIA
=>>
=>
=>Why do you need all of the msg_class(es) global? Why not put them into a
=>module and import the module where you need them? This would be the
=>conventional way to avoid such problems.

The idea is that DS101 is being called in a loop in the ds101 module to
create a lot of msg_classes. The same is true for the FDUCLASS function;
it creates a lot of classes in a loop.

In addition, I have two other functions, almost alike, in two seperate
modules (mdefs is a structure with all of the stuff needed to drive the
loops)

def __InitDS101Classes():
for m in mdefs:
mdef = mdefs[m]
name = mdefs[m]['name']+'DS101'
nclass = new.classobj(name,(DS101,),{})
nclass.mdef = mdef
nclass.mid = m
globals()[name] = nclass
def __InitFDUClasses():
for m in mdefs:
mdef = mdefs[m]
name = mdefs[m]['name']+'FDU'
nclass = new.classobj(name,(FDU,),{})
nclass.mdef = mdef
nclass.mid = m
globals()[name] = nclass

I'm trying to see if by being clever, I can factor out the common code of
the four different functions and still end up with what they create ending
up in the namespaces where they are intended to reside in. Does this make
sense or am I way off base?

If I get your intention, the imported module idea still works:
# imported.py

pass
# module1.py

import imported

imported.abc = 2
# module2.py

import module1
import imported

print imported.abc
James
Apr 27 '07 #5

P: n/a
Steven W. Orr wrote:
On Friday, Apr 27th 2007 at 14:07 -0700, quoth James Stroud:

=>Steven W. Orr wrote:
=>I have two seperate modules doing factory stuff which each have the
=>similar function2:
=>>
=>In the ds101 module, def DS101CLASS(mname,data):
=> cname = mname+'DS101'
=> msg_class = globals()[cname]
=> msg = msg_class(data)
=> return msg
=>>
=>and in the fdu module,
=>>
=>def FDUCLASS(mname,data):
=> cname = mname+'FDU'
=> msg_class = globals()[cname]
=> msg = msg_class(data)
=> return msg
=>>
=>I was thinking I'd be clever and create a common function:
=>def procCLASS(mname, objname, data):
=> cname = mname+objname
=> msg_class = globals()[cname]
=> msg = msg_class(data)
=> return msg
=>>
=>but the call to globals fouls it all up. Is there a way to write it so
=>that the call to globals can be parameterized to be in the context of a
=>specific module?
=>>
=>Also, I need to go the other way, a la,
=> globals()[name] = nclass
=>>
=>Is this doable?
=>>
=>TIA
=>>
=>
=>Why do you need all of the msg_class(es) global? Why not put them into a
=>module and import the module where you need them? This would be the
=>conventional way to avoid such problems.

The idea is that DS101 is being called in a loop in the ds101 module to
create a lot of msg_classes. The same is true for the FDUCLASS function;
it creates a lot of classes in a loop.

In addition, I have two other functions, almost alike, in two seperate
modules (mdefs is a structure with all of the stuff needed to drive the
loops)

def __InitDS101Classes():
for m in mdefs:
mdef = mdefs[m]
name = mdefs[m]['name']+'DS101'
nclass = new.classobj(name,(DS101,),{})
nclass.mdef = mdef
nclass.mid = m
globals()[name] = nclass
def __InitFDUClasses():
for m in mdefs:
mdef = mdefs[m]
name = mdefs[m]['name']+'FDU'
nclass = new.classobj(name,(FDU,),{})
nclass.mdef = mdef
nclass.mid = m
globals()[name] = nclass

I'm trying to see if by being clever, I can factor out the common code of
the four different functions and still end up with what they create ending
up in the namespaces where they are intended to reside in. Does this make
sense or am I way off base?

Even if you *can* factor out the common code there's no reason why that
shouldn't go in a fifth module that the other four import ...

regards
Steve
--
Steve Holden +1 571 484 6266 +1 800 494 3119
Holden Web LLC/Ltd http://www.holdenweb.com
Skype: holdenweb http://del.icio.us/steve.holden
------------------ Asciimercial ---------------------
Get Python in your .sig and on the web. Blog and lens
holdenweb.blogspot.com squidoo.com/pythonology
tag items: del.icio.us/steve.holden/python
All these services currently offer free registration!
-------------- Thank You for Reading ----------------

Apr 28 '07 #6

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.