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creating an object from base class

P: n/a
i wish to have some extended functionality added to sockets

i can create my own socket class class mysocket(socket.socket):

and all should be fine. Except, the sockets are created for me by the
accept method, listening on port. So how can i take the standard
socket created for me and create a 'mysocket'. I need a method that
will initialise any new properties i have added in my class, but how
can i change the class of the socket created?

Apr 27 '07 #1
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P: n/a
io*****@attglobal.net a écrit :
i wish to have some extended functionality added to sockets

i can create my own socket class class mysocket(socket.socket):

and all should be fine. Except, the sockets are created for me by the
accept method, listening on port. So how can i take the standard
socket created for me and create a 'mysocket'. I need a method that
will initialise any new properties i have added in my class, but how
can i change the class of the socket created?
object.__class__ = OtherClass

But this may not be the wisest solution. What you want is not
inheritance, it's decoration (AKA wrapping). IOW : instead of directly
using accept(), use a wrapper around it that will returns socket objects
wrapped in your own class.

My 2 cents...
Apr 27 '07 #2

P: n/a
Quote iogilvy:
i wish to have some extended functionality added to sockets

i can create my own socket class class mysocket(socket.socket):

and all should be fine. Except, the sockets are created for me by the
accept method, listening on port. So how can i take the standard
socket created for me and create a 'mysocket'. I need a method that
will initialise any new properties i have added in my class, but how
can i change the class of the socket created?
Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't believe it's possible to
change the type of objects made from builtin classes. Though if it's a
custom class you can, for example:
>>class Foo: pass
class Bar: pass
obj = Foo()
obj.__class__ = Bar

One option is to make your custom socket a wrapper around
socket.socket and then pass through the calls you don't want to handle
to socket.socket. The downside to this is there are quite a lot of
methods that need to be accounted for. For example:
>>class CustomSocket:
def __init__(self, socket):
self.socket = socket
def connect(self, address):
self.socket.connect( address + '.some.tld' )
[etc]

...

s = server_socket.accept()
s = CustomSocket(s)

Another approach you might want to look at is populating your object
at runtime through a function. This won't give it the type you want,
but it will give it any methods and attributes it would have gotten
from your class with the added benefit of it still being of type
socket.socket. Example:
>>def modify_socket( socket ):
socket.cabbages = 'Yuk'
socket.apples = 'Yum'

def info():
print 'Cabbages? %s\nApples? %s' % (socket.cabbages, socket.apples)
obj.show_info = info

...

s = server_socket.accept()
modify_socket( s )
s.show_info()
Cabbages? Yuk
Apples? Yum
>>s.apples = 'Yummie'
s.show_info()
Cabbages? Yuk
Apples? Yummie
>>type(s)
<class 'socket._socketobject'>

Good luck.

Ian
Apr 27 '07 #3

P: n/a
Ian Clark wrote:
Quote iogilvy:
>i wish to have some extended functionality added to sockets

i can create my own socket class class mysocket(socket.socket):

and all should be fine. Except, the sockets are created for me by the
accept method, listening on port. So how can i take the standard
socket created for me and create a 'mysocket'. I need a method that
will initialise any new properties i have added in my class, but how
can i change the class of the socket created?

Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't believe it's possible to
change the type of objects made from builtin classes. Though if it's a
custom class you can, for example:
>>>class Foo: pass
class Bar: pass
obj = Foo()
obj.__class__ = Bar

Yes, assuming you weren't asking a rhetorical question you will
eventually run up against
>>class myClass1(object): pass
...
>>class myClass2(object): pass
...
>>mc1 = myClass1()
type(mc1)
<class '__main__.myClass1'>
>>mc1.__class__ = myClass2
type(mc1)
<class '__main__.myClass2'>
>>2 . __class__ = myClass1
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: __class__ assignment: only for heap types
>>>
This doesn't qualify as error message of the year, but it clearly tells
you you aren't going to get around the prohibition. We also see
>>o = object
o.__class__ = myClass2
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: can't set attributes of built-in/extension type 'object'
>>>
which gives a much better error message. Of course it'll probably only
take Alex Martelli a few minutes to find a workaround or counter-example.
One option is to make your custom socket a wrapper around
socket.socket and then pass through the calls you don't want to handle
to socket.socket. The downside to this is there are quite a lot of
methods that need to be accounted for. For example:
>>>class CustomSocket:
def __init__(self, socket):
self.socket = socket
def connect(self, address):
self.socket.connect( address + '.some.tld' )
[etc]

...

s = server_socket.accept()
s = CustomSocket(s)
This technique is formally called "delegation" if you want to Google it.
>
Another approach you might want to look at is populating your object
at runtime through a function. This won't give it the type you want,
but it will give it any methods and attributes it would have gotten
from your class with the added benefit of it still being of type
socket.socket. Example:
>>>def modify_socket( socket ):
socket.cabbages = 'Yuk'
socket.apples = 'Yum'

def info():
print 'Cabbages? %s\nApples? %s' % (socket.cabbages, socket.apples)
obj.show_info = info

...

s = server_socket.accept()
modify_socket( s )
s.show_info()
Cabbages? Yuk
Apples? Yum
>>>s.apples = 'Yummie'
s.show_info()
Cabbages? Yuk
Apples? Yummie
>>>type(s)
<class 'socket._socketobject'>
Of course that approach sucks if sockets happen to have an organes or
apples attribute that's used in the inner workings of the class. This is
when the C++ devotees start screaming about protected and private
variables. Just ignore them :-)

[Note: these remarks are more for the OP than Ian]

regards
Steve
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Apr 28 '07 #4

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