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RFC: Assignment as expression (pre-PEP)

P: n/a
I would like to gauge interest in the following proposal:

Problem:

Assignment statements cannot be used as expressions.

Performing a list of mutually exclusive checks that require data
processing can cause excessive tabification. For example, consider
the following python snipet...

temp = my_re1.match(exp)
if temp:
# do something with temp
else:
temp = my_re2.match(exp)
if temp:
# do something with temp
else:
temp = my_re3.match(exp)
if temp:
# do something with temp
else:
temp = my_re4.match(exp)

# etc.

Even with 2-space tabification, after about 20 matches, the
indentation will take up half an 80-column terminal screen.

Details:

Python distinguishes between an assignment statement and an equality
expression. This is to force disambiguation of assignment and
comparison so that a statement like:

if x = 3:

Will raise an expression rather than allowing the programmer to
accidentally overwrite x. Likewise,

x == 3

Will either return True, False or raise a NameError exception, which
can alert the author of any potential coding mistakes since if x = 3
(assignment) was meant, assignment being a statement returns nothing
(though it may raise an exception depending on the underlying
assignment function called).

Because this forced disambiguation is a guiding virtue of the python
language, it would NOT be wise to change these semantics of the
language.

Proposal:

Add a new assignment-expression operator to disambiguate it completely
from existing operators.

Although any number of glyph could be used for such a new operator, I
here propose using pascal/gnu make-like assignment. Specifically,

let:

x = 3

Be a statement that returns nothing;

let:

x == 3

Be an expression that, when x is a valid, in-scope name, returns True
or False;

let:

x := 3

Be an expression that first assigned the value (3) to x, then returns
x.

Thus...

if x = 3:
# Rais exception
pass

if x == 3:
# Execute IFF x has a value equivalent to 3
pass

if x := 3:
# Executes based on value of x after assignment;
# since x will be 3 and non-zero and thus represents true, always
executed
pass

Additional:

Since python allows in-place operator assignment, (e.g. +=, *=, etc.),
allow for these forms again by prefixing each diglyph with a colon
(:), forming a triglyph.

E.g.

if x :+= 3:
# Executes IFF, after adding 3 to x, x represents a non-zero number.
pass

Also note, that although the colon operator is used to denote the
beginning of a programme block, it should be easily distinguished from
the usage of : to denote a diglyph or triglyph assignment expression
as well as the trinary conditional expression. This is because
firstly, the statement(s) following a colon (:) in existing python
should never begin with an assignment operator. I.e.,

if x: = y

is currently not valid python. Any attempt at interpreting the
meaning of such an expression in the current implementation of python
is likely to fail. Secondly, the diglyph and triglyph expressions do
not contain spaces, further disambiguating them from existing python.

Alternative proposals for dyglyph and triglyph representations for
assignment expressions are welcome.

Implementation details:

When the python interpreter parser encounters a diglyph or triglyph
beginning with a colon (:) and ending with an equals sign (=), perform
the assignment specified by glyph[1:] and then return the value of the
variable(s) on the left-hand side of the expression. The assignment
function called would be based on standard python lookup rules for the
corresponding glyph[1:] operation (the glyph without the leading
colon).

Opposition:

Adding any new operator to python could be considered code bloat.

Using a colon in this way could still be ambiguous.

Adding the ability to read triglyph operators in the python
interpreter parser would require too big a code revision.

Usage is too obscure.

Using an assignment expression would lead to multiple conceptual
instructions for a single python statement (e.g. first an assignment,
then an if based on the assignment would mean two operations for a
single if statement.)

Comments:

[Please comment]

Jeffrey.

Apr 5 '07 #1
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20 Replies


P: n/a
On Thu, 2007-04-05 at 12:51 -0700, Ti*******@gmail.com wrote:
I would like to gauge interest in the following proposal:

Problem:

Assignment statements cannot be used as expressions.

Performing a list of mutually exclusive checks that require data
processing can cause excessive tabification. For example, consider
the following python snipet...

temp = my_re1.match(exp)
if temp:
# do something with temp
else:
temp = my_re2.match(exp)
if temp:
# do something with temp
else:
temp = my_re3.match(exp)
if temp:
# do something with temp
else:
temp = my_re4.match(exp)

# etc.

Even with 2-space tabification, after about 20 matches, the
indentation will take up half an 80-column terminal screen.
If that's your only justification for this proposal, that's almost
certainly not enough to convince anybody of its necessity. Your code
example should be rewritten as a loop:

match_actions = [(my_re1, action1),
(my_re2, action2),
...]

for my_re, action in match_actions:
if my_re.match(exp):
action(exp)
break

Hope this helps,

Carsten
Apr 5 '07 #2

P: n/a
Ti*******@gmail.com wrote:
Performing a list of mutually exclusive checks that require data
processing can cause excessive tabification. For example, consider
the following python snipet...

temp = my_re1.match(exp)
if temp:
# do something with temp
else:
temp = my_re2.match(exp)
if temp:
# do something with temp
else:
temp = my_re3.match(exp)
if temp:
# do something with temp
else:
temp = my_re4.match(exp)
Can you come up with a real example where this happens and which cannot be
easily rewritten to provide better, clearer code without the indentation?

I'll admit to having occasionally had code not entirely dissimilar to this
when first written, but I don't believe it has ever survived more than a
few minutes before being refactored into a cleaner form. I would claim that
it is a good thing that Python makes it obvious that code like this should
be refactored.
Apr 5 '07 #3

P: n/a
Carsten Haese <ca*****@uniqsys.comwrote:
If that's your only justification for this proposal, that's almost
certainly not enough to convince anybody of its necessity. Your code
example should be rewritten as a loop:

match_actions = [(my_re1, action1),
(my_re2, action2),
...]

for my_re, action in match_actions:
if my_re.match(exp):
action(exp)
break
Depending on what his 'do something with temp' actually was, it may or may
not be easy to rewrite it as a for loop. However, even if a for loop isn't
an obvious replacement other solutions may be appropriate such as combining
the regular expressions to a single regex with named groups and/or using
the command pattern.

If assignment was an expression that only addresses one problem with
the sample code. It still leaves his code with excessive repetition and
probably with an excessively long function that calls out to be refactored
as a group of smaller methods.
Apr 5 '07 #4

P: n/a
On Apr 5, 4:22 pm, Duncan Booth <duncan.bo...@invalid.invalidwrote:
Can you come up with a real example where this happens and which cannot be
easily rewritten to provide better, clearer code without the indentation?

I'll admit to having occasionally had code not entirely dissimilar to this
when first written, but I don't believe it has ever survived more than a
few minutes before being refactored into a cleaner form. I would claim that
it is a good thing that Python makes it obvious that code like this should
be refactored.
I am trying to write a parser for a text string. Specifically, I am
trying to take a filename that contains meta-data about the content of
the A/V file (mpg, mp3, etc.).

I first split the filename into fields separated by spaces and dots.

Then I have a series of regular expression matches. I like
Cartesian's 'event-based' parser approach though the even table gets a
bit unwieldy as it grows. Also, I would prefer to have the 'action'
result in a variable assignment specific to the test. E.g.

def parseName(name):
fields = sd.split(name)
fields, ext = fields[:-1], fields[-1]
year = ''
capper = ''
series = None
episodeNum = None
programme = ''
episodeName = ''
past_title = false
for f in fields:
if year_re.match(f):
year = f
past_title = True
else:
my_match = capper_re.match(f):
if my_match:
capper = capper_re.match(f).group(1)
if capper == 'JJ' or capper == 'JeffreyJacobs':
capper = 'Jeffrey C. Jacobs'
past_title = True
else:
my_match = epnum_re.match(f):
if my_match:
series, episodeNum = my_match.group('series',
'episode')
past_title = True
else:
# If I think of other parse elements, they go
here.
# Otherwise, name is part of a title; check for
capitalization
if f[0] >= 'a' and f[0] <= 'z' and f not in
do_not_capitalize:
f = f.capitalize()
if past_title:
if episodeName: episodeName += ' '
episodeName += f
else:
if programme: programme += ' '
programme += f

return programme, series, episodeName, episodeNum, year, capper,
ext

Now, the problem with this code is that it assumes only 2 pieces of
free-form meta-data in the name (i.e. Programme Name and Episode
Name). Also, although this is not directly adaptable to Cartesian's
approach, you COULD rewrite it using a dictionary in the place of
local variable names so that the event lookup could consist of 3
properties per event: compiled_re, action_method, dictionary_string.
But even with that, in the case of the epnum match, two assignments
are required so perhaps a convoluted scheme such that if
dictionary_string is a list, for each of the values returned by
action_method, bind the result to the corresponding ith dictionary
element named in dictionary_string, which seems a bit convoluted. And
the fall-through case is state-dependent since the 'unrecognized
field' should be shuffled into a different variable dependent on
state. Still, if there is a better approach I am certainly up for
it. I love event-based parsers so I have no problem with that
approach in general.

Apr 5 '07 #5

P: n/a
da******@timehorse.com:
else:
my_match = capper_re.match(f):
if my_match:
capper = capper_re.match(f).group(1)
if capper == 'JJ' or capper == 'JeffreyJacobs':
capper = 'Jeffrey C. Jacobs'
past_title = True
The assignment to my_match here is not used, so the test can be "if
capper_re.match(f)" which can then merge up into the previous else as an
elif dropping one level of indentation.

Neil
Apr 5 '07 #6

P: n/a
On Apr 5, 6:01 pm, Neil Hodgson <nyamatongwe+thun...@gmail.comwrote:
darkl...@timehorse.com:
else:
my_match = capper_re.match(f):
if my_match:
capper = capper_re.match(f).group(1)
if capper == 'JJ' or capper == 'JeffreyJacobs':
capper = 'Jeffrey C. Jacobs'
past_title = True

The assignment to my_match here is not used, so the test can be "if
capper_re.match(f)" which can then merge up into the previous else as an
elif dropping one level of indentation.

Neil
That was a typo. I meant to reuse my_match in the line "capper =
my_match.group(1)" rather than the line above just so I would not have
to evaluate the regular expression twice. Sorry for the confusion.

Jeffrey.

Apr 5 '07 #7

P: n/a
da******@timehorse.com wrote:
On Apr 5, 4:22 pm, Duncan Booth <duncan.bo...@invalid.invalidwrote:
>Can you come up with a real example where this happens and which cannot be
easily rewritten to provide better, clearer code without the indentation?

I'll admit to having occasionally had code not entirely dissimilar to this
when first written, but I don't believe it has ever survived more than a
few minutes before being refactored into a cleaner form. I would claim that
it is a good thing that Python makes it obvious that code like this should
be refactored.

I am trying to write a parser for a text string. Specifically, I am
trying to take a filename that contains meta-data about the content of
the A/V file (mpg, mp3, etc.).

I first split the filename into fields separated by spaces and dots.

Then I have a series of regular expression matches. I like
Cartesian's 'event-based' parser approach though the even table gets a
bit unwieldy as it grows. Also, I would prefer to have the 'action'
result in a variable assignment specific to the test. E.g.

def parseName(name):
fields = sd.split(name)
fields, ext = fields[:-1], fields[-1]
year = ''
capper = ''
series = None
episodeNum = None
programme = ''
episodeName = ''
past_title = false
for f in fields:
if year_re.match(f):
year = f
past_title = True
else:
my_match = capper_re.match(f):
if my_match:
capper = capper_re.match(f).group(1)
if capper == 'JJ' or capper == 'JeffreyJacobs':
capper = 'Jeffrey C. Jacobs'
past_title = True
else:
my_match = epnum_re.match(f):
if my_match:
series, episodeNum = my_match.group('series',
'episode')
past_title = True
else:
# If I think of other parse elements, they go
here.
# Otherwise, name is part of a title; check for
capitalization
if f[0] >= 'a' and f[0] <= 'z' and f not in
do_not_capitalize:
f = f.capitalize()
if past_title:
if episodeName: episodeName += ' '
episodeName += f
else:
if programme: programme += ' '
programme += f

return programme, series, episodeName, episodeNum, year, capper,
ext
Why can't you combine your regular expressions into a single expression,
e.g. something like::
>>exp = r'''
... (?P<year>\d{4})
... |
... by\[(?P<capper>.*)\]
... |
... S(?P<series>\d\d)E(?P<episode>\d\d)
... '''
>>matcher = re.compile(exp, re.VERBOSE)
matcher.match('1990').groupdict()
{'series': None, 'capper': None, 'episode': None, 'year': '1990'}
>>matcher.match('by[Jovev]').groupdict()
{'series': None, 'capper': 'Jovev', 'episode': None, 'year': None}
>>matcher.match('S01E12').groupdict()
{'series': '01', 'capper': None, 'episode': '12', 'year': None}

Then your code above would look something like::

for f in fields:
match = matcher.match(f)
if match is not None:
year = match.group('year')
capper = match.group('capper')
if capper == 'JJ' or capper == 'JeffreyJacobs':
capper = 'Jeffrey C. Jacobs'
series = match.group('series')
episodeNum = match.group('episode')
past_title = True
else:
if 'a' <= f[0] <= 'z' and f not in do_not_capitalize:
f = f.capitalize()
if past_title:
if episodeName:
episodeName += ' '
episodeName += f
else:
if programme:
programme += ' '
programme += f

STeVe
Apr 5 '07 #8

P: n/a
Steven Bethard wrote:
da******@timehorse.com wrote:
>On Apr 5, 4:22 pm, Duncan Booth <duncan.bo...@invalid.invalidwrote:
>>Can you come up with a real example where this happens and which
cannot be
easily rewritten to provide better, clearer code without the
indentation?

I'll admit to having occasionally had code not entirely dissimilar to
this
when first written, but I don't believe it has ever survived more than a
few minutes before being refactored into a cleaner form. I would
claim that
it is a good thing that Python makes it obvious that code like this
should
be refactored.

I am trying to write a parser for a text string. Specifically, I am
trying to take a filename that contains meta-data about the content of
the A/V file (mpg, mp3, etc.).

I first split the filename into fields separated by spaces and dots.

Then I have a series of regular expression matches. I like
Cartesian's 'event-based' parser approach though the even table gets a
bit unwieldy as it grows. Also, I would prefer to have the 'action'
result in a variable assignment specific to the test. E.g.

def parseName(name):
fields = sd.split(name)
fields, ext = fields[:-1], fields[-1]
year = ''
capper = ''
series = None
episodeNum = None
programme = ''
episodeName = ''
past_title = false
for f in fields:
if year_re.match(f):
year = f
past_title = True
else:
my_match = capper_re.match(f):
if my_match:
capper = capper_re.match(f).group(1)
if capper == 'JJ' or capper == 'JeffreyJacobs':
capper = 'Jeffrey C. Jacobs'
past_title = True
else:
my_match = epnum_re.match(f):
if my_match:
series, episodeNum = my_match.group('series',
'episode')
past_title = True
else:
# If I think of other parse elements, they go
here.
# Otherwise, name is part of a title; check for
capitalization
if f[0] >= 'a' and f[0] <= 'z' and f not in
do_not_capitalize:
f = f.capitalize()
if past_title:
if episodeName: episodeName += ' '
episodeName += f
else:
if programme: programme += ' '
programme += f

return programme, series, episodeName, episodeNum, year, capper,
ext

Why can't you combine your regular expressions into a single expression,
e.g. something like::
>>exp = r'''
... (?P<year>\d{4})
... |
... by\[(?P<capper>.*)\]
... |
... S(?P<series>\d\d)E(?P<episode>\d\d)
... '''
>>matcher = re.compile(exp, re.VERBOSE)
>>matcher.match('1990').groupdict()
{'series': None, 'capper': None, 'episode': None, 'year': '1990'}
>>matcher.match('by[Jovev]').groupdict()
{'series': None, 'capper': 'Jovev', 'episode': None, 'year': None}
>>matcher.match('S01E12').groupdict()
{'series': '01', 'capper': None, 'episode': '12', 'year': None}

Then your code above would look something like::

for f in fields:
match = matcher.match(f)
if match is not None:
year = match.group('year')
capper = match.group('capper')
if capper == 'JJ' or capper == 'JeffreyJacobs':
capper = 'Jeffrey C. Jacobs'
series = match.group('series')
episodeNum = match.group('episode')
past_title = True
I guess you need to be a little more careful here not to overwrite your
old values, e.g. something like::

year = match.group('year') or year
capper = match.group('capper') or capper
...

STeVe
Apr 5 '07 #9

P: n/a
Ti*******@gmail.com a écrit :
I would like to gauge interest in the following proposal:

Problem:

Assignment statements cannot be used as expressions.
This is by design.
Performing a list of mutually exclusive checks that require data
processing can cause excessive tabification. For example, consider
the following python snipet...

temp = my_re1.match(exp)
if temp:
# do something with temp
else:
temp = my_re2.match(exp)
if temp:
# do something with temp
else:
temp = my_re3.match(exp)
if temp:
# do something with temp
else:
temp = my_re4.match(exp)
OMG.

actions = [
(my_re1, do_something_with_temp1),
(my_re2, do_something_with_temp2),
(my_re3, do_something_with_temp3),
(my_re4, do_something_with_temp4),
]

for my_re, do_something_with in actions:
temp = my_re.match(exp):
if temp:
do_something_with(temp)
break

Having full-blown anonymous functions or Ruby/Smalltalk-like code blocks
would be much more interesting IMHO.
Apr 5 '07 #10

P: n/a
Duncan Booth a écrit :
Ti*******@gmail.com wrote:

>>Performing a list of mutually exclusive checks that require data
processing can cause excessive tabification. For example, consider
the following python snipet...

temp = my_re1.match(exp)
if temp:
# do something with temp
else:
temp = my_re2.match(exp)
if temp:
# do something with temp
else:
temp = my_re3.match(exp)
if temp:
# do something with temp
else:
temp = my_re4.match(exp)


Can you come up with a real example where this happens and which cannot be
easily rewritten to provide better, clearer code without the indentation?

I'll admit to having occasionally had code not entirely dissimilar to this
when first written, but I don't believe it has ever survived more than a
few minutes before being refactored into a cleaner form. I would claim that
it is a good thing that Python makes it obvious that code like this should
be refactored.
+2 QOTW
Apr 5 '07 #11

P: n/a
En Thu, 05 Apr 2007 18:08:46 -0300, da******@timehorse.com
<Ti*******@gmail.comescribió:
I am trying to write a parser for a text string. Specifically, I am
trying to take a filename that contains meta-data about the content of
the A/V file (mpg, mp3, etc.).

I first split the filename into fields separated by spaces and dots.

Then I have a series of regular expression matches. I like
Cartesian's 'event-based' parser approach though the even table gets a
bit unwieldy as it grows. Also, I would prefer to have the 'action'
result in a variable assignment specific to the test. E.g.

def parseName(name):
fields = sd.split(name)
fields, ext = fields[:-1], fields[-1]
year = ''
capper = ''
series = None
episodeNum = None
programme = ''
episodeName = ''
past_title = false
for f in fields:
if year_re.match(f):
year = f
past_title = True
else:
my_match = capper_re.match(f):
if my_match:
capper = capper_re.match(f).group(1)
if capper == 'JJ' or capper == 'JeffreyJacobs':
capper = 'Jeffrey C. Jacobs'
past_title = True
else:
my_match = epnum_re.match(f):
if my_match:
series, episodeNum = my_match.group('series',
'episode')
past_title = True
else:
# If I think of other parse elements, they go
here.
# Otherwise, name is part of a title; check for
capitalization
if f[0] >= 'a' and f[0] <= 'z' and f not in
do_not_capitalize:
f = f.capitalize()
if past_title:
if episodeName: episodeName += ' '
episodeName += f
else:
if programme: programme += ' '
programme += f

return programme, series, episodeName, episodeNum, year, capper,
ext

Now, the problem with this code is that it assumes only 2 pieces of
free-form meta-data in the name (i.e. Programme Name and Episode
Name). Also, although this is not directly adaptable to Cartesian's
approach, you COULD rewrite it using a dictionary in the place of
local variable names so that the event lookup could consist of 3
properties per event: compiled_re, action_method, dictionary_string.
But even with that, in the case of the epnum match, two assignments
are required so perhaps a convoluted scheme such that if
dictionary_string is a list, for each of the values returned by
action_method, bind the result to the corresponding ith dictionary
element named in dictionary_string, which seems a bit convoluted. And
the fall-through case is state-dependent since the 'unrecognized
field' should be shuffled into a different variable dependent on
state. Still, if there is a better approach I am certainly up for
it. I love event-based parsers so I have no problem with that
approach in general.
Maybe it's worth using a class instance. Define methods to handle each
matching regex, and keep state in the instance.

class NameParser:

def handle_year(self, field, match):
self.year = field
self.past_title = True

def handle_capper(self, field, match):
capper = match.group(1)
if capper == 'JJ' or capper == 'JeffreyJacobs':
capper = 'Jeffrey C. Jacobs'
self.capper = capper
self.past_title = True

def parse(self, name):
fields = sd.split(name)
for field in fields:
for regex,handler in self.handlers:
match = regex.match(field)
if match:
handler(self, field, match)
break

You have to build the handlers list, containing (regex, handler) items;
the "unknown" case might be a match-all expression at the end.
Well, after playing a bit with decorators I got this:

class NameParser:

year = ''
capper = ''
series = None
episodeNum = None
programme = ''
episodeName = ''
past_title = False
handlers = []

def __init__(self, name):
self.name = name
self.parse()

def handle_this(regex, handlers=handlers):
# A decorator; associates the function to the regex
# (Not intended to be used as a normal method! not even a static
method!)
def register(function, regex=regex):
handlers.append((re.compile(regex), function))
return function
return register

@handle_this(r"\(?\d+\)?")
def handle_year(self, field, match):
self.year = field
self.past_title = True

@handle_this(r"(expression)")
def handle_capper(self, field, match):
capper = match.group(1)
if capper == 'JJ' or capper == 'JeffreyJacobs':
capper = 'Jeffrey C. Jacobs'
self.capper = capper
self.past_title = True

@handle_this(r".*")
def handle_unknown(self, field, match):
if field[0] >= 'a' and field[0] <= 'z' and field not in
do_not_capitalize:
field = field.capitalize()
if self.past_title:
if self.episodeName: self.episodeName += ' '
self.episodeName += field
else:
if self.programme: self.programme += ' '
self.programme += field

def parse(self):
fields = sd.split(self.name)
for field in fields:
for regex,handler in self.handlers:
match = regex.match(field)
if match:
handler(self, field, match)
break
--
Gabriel Genellina

Apr 5 '07 #12

P: n/a
"Gabriel Genellina" <ga*******@yahoo.com.arwrote:
You have to build the handlers list, containing (regex, handler) items;
the "unknown" case might be a match-all expression at the end.
Well, after playing a bit with decorators I got this:
<snip>

That's a nice class, and more maintainable with the separate handler
methods than a long function. Here's a completely untested variation. I
hope the intent is clear:

def handle_this(regex, handlers=handlers):
# A decorator; associates the function to the regex
# (Not intended to be used as a normal method!
# not even a static method!)
def register(function, regex=regex):
handlers.append((function.__name__, regex))
return function
return register

... insert handlers here ...

def parse(self):
regex = '|'.join(['(?P<%s>%s)' % pair for pair in self.handlers])
fields = str.split(self.name)
for field in fields:
match = regex.match(field)
if match:
handler = getattr(self,
match.lastgroup,
self.handle_unknown)
handler(self, field, match)

The handler functions themselves would have to be constrained to also use
only named groups, but you gain by only having a single regex.match call on
each field which could (if there are a lot of handlers) be significant.

The calculation of regex could also of course be pulled out of parse to
somewhere it only happens once for the class instead of once per instance.
Apr 6 '07 #13

P: n/a
On Apr 5, 4:08 pm, "darkl...@timehorse.com" <TimeHo...@gmail.com>
wrote:
I love event-based parsers so I have no problem with that
approach in general.
You might find a pyparsing version of this to be to your liking. It
is possible in the parser events (or "parse actions" as pyparsing
calls them) to perform operations such as capitalization, string
replacement, or string-to-integer conversion. To assign names to
specific fields, one defines results names using setResultsName. A
grammar for your file name might look something like (I'm just
guessing from your code):

from pyparsing import *
def parseName2(name):
"""Parse filenames of the form:

programmeTitle.year.series.episodeNum.episodeName. capper.ext
"""
capper = oneOf("JJ JeffreyJacobs").replaceWith("Jeffrey C.
Jacobs").setResultsName("capper")
ext = Word(alphanums).setResultsName("ext")
year = Word(nums,exact=4).setResultsName("year")
capitalizeAll = lambda tokens : map(str.capitalize, tokens)
title = Combine( OneOrMore( ~year +
Word(alphas) ).setParseAction( capitalizeAll ), joinString=" " ) \
.setResultsName("programme")
seriesAndEpnum = Combine( OneOrMore( ~Literal("-") +
Word(alphas) ).setParseAction( capitalizeAll ),
joinString=" ").setResultsName("series") + \
Word(nums).setResultsName("episodeNum")
epname = Combine( OneOrMore( ~capper +
Word(alphas) ).setParseAction( capitalizeAll ), joinString=" " ) \
.setResultsName("episodeName")
fileName = title + "." + year + "." + seriesAndEpnum + "." +
epname + "." + capper + "." + ext
parts = fileName.parseString(name)
return parts.programme, parts.series, parts.episodeName,
parts.episodeNum, parst.year, parts.capper, parts.ext

In this example, the parse actions are capitalizeAll (easily
implemented with a simple lambda), and replaceWith (which is included
with pyparsing).

-- Paul
Apr 8 '07 #14

P: n/a
On Apr 7, 9:55 pm, "Paul McGuire" <p...@austin.rr.comwrote:
seriesAndEpnum = Combine( OneOrMore( ~Literal("-") +
Word(alphas) ).setParseAction( capitalizeAll ),
joinString=" ").setResultsName("series") + \
Word(nums).setResultsName("episodeNum")
should be:

seriesAndEpnum =
Combine( OneOrMore( Word(alphas) ).setParseAction( capitalizeAll ),
joinString=" ").setResultsName("series") + \
"-" + Word(nums).setResultsName("episodeNum")

(This example is hypothetical based on the limited info in your posted
code, the purpose of this element was to try to emulate your case
where two "variables" are defined in a single expression.)

-- Paul

Apr 8 '07 #15

P: n/a
On Apr 5, 2:51 pm, TimeHo...@gmail.com wrote:
I would like to gauge interest in the following proposal:

Problem:

Assignment statements cannot be used as expressions.

Performing a list of mutually exclusive checks that require data
processing can cause excessive tabification. For example, consider
the following python snipet...

temp = my_re1.match(exp)
if temp:
# do something with temp
else:
temp = my_re2.match(exp)
if temp:
# do something with temp
else:
temp = my_re3.match(exp)
if temp:
# do something with temp
else:
temp = my_re4.match(exp)

# etc.

Even with 2-space tabification, after about 20 matches, the
indentation will take up half an 80-column terminal screen.

Details:

Python distinguishes between an assignment statement and an equality
expression. This is to force disambiguation of assignment and
comparison so that a statement like:

if x = 3:

Will raise an expression rather than allowing the programmer to
accidentally overwrite x. Likewise,

x == 3

Will either return True, False or raise a NameError exception, which
can alert the author of any potential coding mistakes since if x = 3
(assignment) was meant, assignment being a statement returns nothing
(though it may raise an exception depending on the underlying
assignment function called).

Because this forced disambiguation is a guiding virtue of the python
language, it would NOT be wise to change these semantics of the
language.

Proposal:

Add a new assignment-expression operator to disambiguate it completely
from existing operators.

Although any number of glyph could be used for such a new operator, I
here propose using pascal/gnu make-like assignment. Specifically,

let:

x = 3

Be a statement that returns nothing;

let:

x == 3

Be an expression that, when x is a valid, in-scope name, returns True
or False;

let:

x := 3

Be an expression that first assigned the value (3) to x, then returns
x.

Thus...

if x = 3:
# Rais exception
pass

if x == 3:
# Execute IFF x has a value equivalent to 3
pass

if x := 3:
# Executes based on value of x after assignment;
# since x will be 3 and non-zero and thus represents true, always
executed
pass

Additional:

Since python allows in-place operator assignment, (e.g. +=, *=, etc.),
allow for these forms again by prefixing each diglyph with a colon
(:), forming a triglyph.

E.g.

if x :+= 3:
# Executes IFF, after adding 3 to x, x represents a non-zero number.
pass

Also note, that although the colon operator is used to denote the
beginning of a programme block, it should be easily distinguished from
the usage of : to denote a diglyph or triglyph assignment expression
as well as the trinary conditional expression. This is because
firstly, the statement(s) following a colon (:) in existing python
should never begin with an assignment operator. I.e.,

if x: = y

is currently not valid python. Any attempt at interpreting the
meaning of such an expression in the current implementation of python
is likely to fail. Secondly, the diglyph and triglyph expressions do
not contain spaces, further disambiguating them from existing python.

Alternative proposals for dyglyph and triglyph representations for
assignment expressions are welcome.

Implementation details:

When the python interpreter parser encounters a diglyph or triglyph
beginning with a colon (:) and ending with an equals sign (=), perform
the assignment specified by glyph[1:] and then return the value of the
variable(s) on the left-hand side of the expression. The assignment
function called would be based on standard python lookup rules for the
corresponding glyph[1:] operation (the glyph without the leading
colon).

Opposition:

Adding any new operator to python could be considered code bloat.

Using a colon in this way could still be ambiguous.

Adding the ability to read triglyph operators in the python
interpreter parser would require too big a code revision.

Usage is too obscure.

Using an assignment expression would lead to multiple conceptual
instructions for a single python statement (e.g. first an assignment,
then an if based on the assignment would mean two operations for a
single if statement.)

Comments:

[Please comment]

Jeffrey.
If you really really really really really really really really really
really really really really really really really really really really
really really really really really really really really really really
really really really really really really really really really really
really really really really really really really really really really
really really really really really really really really really really
really really really really really really really really really really
really really really really really really really really really really
want to do something like this, just create a wrapper class:
>>class Wrapper(object):
def __init__(self, obj):
self.obj = obj
def getit(self):
return self.obj
def setit(self, obj):
self.obj = obj
return obj

>>import random
x = Wrapper(0)
if x.setit(random.randrange(2)):
print 'yes!'
else:
print 'hmmm...'

hmmm...

Apr 8 '07 #16

P: n/a
Dustan <Du**********@gmail.comwrote:
>class Wrapper(object):
def __init__(self, obj):
self.obj = obj
def getit(self):
return self.obj
def setit(self, obj):
self.obj = obj
return obj
Yeah, that's substantialy the same approach I posted as a Python
Cookbook recipe almost six years ago, see
<http://aspn.activestate.com/ASPN/Cookbook/Python/Recipe/66061.

My specific use case for that recipe was when using Python to code a
"reference algorithm" found in a book, so that deep restructuring was
unwanted -- a similar but opposite case is using Python to explore
prototype algorithms that would later be recoded e.g. in C (here, too,
you don't really want to refactor the Python code to use dictionaries
"properly", so assign-and-test is handy).
Alex
Apr 8 '07 #17

P: n/a
On Apr 8, 10:56 am, a...@mac.com (Alex Martelli) wrote:
Dustan <DustanGro...@gmail.comwrote:
>>class Wrapper(object):
def __init__(self, obj):
self.obj = obj
def getit(self):
return self.obj
def setit(self, obj):
self.obj = obj
return obj

Yeah, that's substantialy the same approach I posted as a Python
Cookbook recipe almost six years ago, see
<http://aspn.activestate.com/ASPN/Cookbook/Python/Recipe/66061.
Indeed, I did discover that in my copy of the Python Cookbook some
time ago. Perhaps I should have noted that.
My specific use case for that recipe was when using Python to code a
"reference algorithm" found in a book, so that deep restructuring was
unwanted -- a similar but opposite case is using Python to explore
prototype algorithms that would later be recoded e.g. in C (here, too,
you don't really want to refactor the Python code to use dictionaries
"properly", so assign-and-test is handy).

Alex

Apr 8 '07 #18

P: n/a
Hasn't this been discussed many many times before? I think Guido has
been favourable to the idea of allowing :=, but that was a long time
ago, and I don't think anything ever came of it.

Personally, if anything, I'd like to see more use of the 'as' keyword
as in Python 2.5's new 'with' statement. Assignment is basically what
it adds to the statement, so if anything we should reuse it in other
statements for consistency.

if my_re1.match(exp) as temp:
# do something with temp
elif my_re2.match(exp) as temp:
# do something with temp
elif my_re3.match(exp) as temp:
# do something with temp
elif my_re4.match(exp) as temp:
# do something with temp

As others have mentioned, your particular instance is probably
evidence that you need to restructure your code a little bit, but I do
agree that "x = y; if x: ..." is a common enough idiom that it
warrants a shortcut. And reusing "as", I think, is nice and readable,
and it's an advantage that it doesn't require adding any new keywords
or symbols.

Apr 10 '07 #19

P: n/a
Adam Atlas <ad**@atlas.stwrote:
Hasn't this been discussed many many times before? I think Guido has
been favourable to the idea of allowing :=, but that was a long time
ago, and I don't think anything ever came of it.

Personally, if anything, I'd like to see more use of the 'as' keyword
as in Python 2.5's new 'with' statement. Assignment is basically what
it adds to the statement, so if anything we should reuse it in other
statements for consistency.

if my_re1.match(exp) as temp:
# do something with temp
elif my_re2.match(exp) as temp:
# do something with temp
elif my_re3.match(exp) as temp:
# do something with temp
elif my_re4.match(exp) as temp:
# do something with temp

As others have mentioned, your particular instance is probably
evidence that you need to restructure your code a little bit, but I do
agree that "x = y; if x: ..." is a common enough idiom that it
warrants a shortcut. And reusing "as", I think, is nice and readable,
and it's an advantage that it doesn't require adding any new keywords
or symbols.
Actually, I agree with you. Unfortunately, I doubt python-dev will, but
the chance is good enough that it's probably worth proposing there
(ideally together with a patch to implement it, just to avoid any
[otherwise likely] whines about this being difficult to implement:-).
Alex
Apr 10 '07 #20

P: n/a
Alex Martelli schrieb:
Adam Atlas <ad**@atlas.stwrote:
>Hasn't this been discussed many many times before? I think Guido has
been favourable to the idea of allowing :=, but that was a long time
ago, and I don't think anything ever came of it.

Personally, if anything, I'd like to see more use of the 'as' keyword
as in Python 2.5's new 'with' statement. Assignment is basically what
it adds to the statement, so if anything we should reuse it in other
statements for consistency.

if my_re1.match(exp) as temp:
# do something with temp
elif my_re2.match(exp) as temp:
# do something with temp
elif my_re3.match(exp) as temp:
# do something with temp
elif my_re4.match(exp) as temp:
# do something with temp

As others have mentioned, your particular instance is probably
evidence that you need to restructure your code a little bit, but I do
agree that "x = y; if x: ..." is a common enough idiom that it
warrants a shortcut. And reusing "as", I think, is nice and readable,
and it's an advantage that it doesn't require adding any new keywords
or symbols.

Actually, I agree with you. Unfortunately, I doubt python-dev will, but
the chance is good enough that it's probably worth proposing there
(ideally together with a patch to implement it, just to avoid any
[otherwise likely] whines about this being difficult to implement:-).
The patch is already done -- I have it lying around here :)

Georg

--
Thus spake the Lord: Thou shalt indent with four spaces. No more, no less.
Four shall be the number of spaces thou shalt indent, and the number of thy
indenting shall be four. Eight shalt thou not indent, nor either indent thou
two, excepting that thou then proceed to four. Tabs are right out.

Apr 10 '07 #21

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