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organizing collections of small modules

P: n/a
I have a bunch of small modules that I use within my application. Most
of these modules are single file modules. Currently, I have them set up
as stand-alone modules but because it's a royal pain to fetch five or 10
of these modules for each application and tracking whether or not they
are all up to date, I'm considering putting them all into one collection
(rcsoc a.k.a. random cross-section of code[1]) so it's easier to load,
install, and manage.

Are there better techniques for managing collections of modules in 2.4
or later?

---eric
[1] derives from the expression that hamburger is "random cross-section
of cow"

Mar 25 '07 #1
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P: n/a
"Eric S. Johansson" <es*@harvee.orgwrites:
I have a bunch of small modules that I use within my application. Most of
these modules are single file modules. Currently, I have them set up as
stand-alone modules but because it's a royal pain to fetch five or 10 of these
modules for each application and tracking whether or not they are all up to
date, I'm considering putting them all into one collection (rcsoc
a.k.a. random cross-section of code[1]) so it's easier to load, install, and
manage.

Are there better techniques for managing collections of modules in 2.4 or
later?

---eric
[1] derives from the expression that hamburger is "random cross-section of
cow"
I'm using setuptools for that. If they're somehow connected --
e.g. mathematics, database, finance, etc. -- then I create one single package
for them. If they aren't, then creating several packages isn't hard.

If they are useful enough you can publish them on PyPI and then it is just a
matter of "easy_install" them. If they aren't then you'll have to collect
them somewhere to use easy_install ;-)

It also supplies means to determine the minimum / maximum / exact version that
is required, so this also helps with how up-to-date your library has to be to
be used with some application.
--
Jorge Godoy <jg****@gmail.com>
Mar 25 '07 #2

P: n/a
Jorge Godoy wrote:
"Eric S. Johansson" <es*@harvee.orgwrites:
>I have a bunch of small modules that I use within my application. Most of
these modules are single file modules. Currently, I have them set up as
stand-alone modules but because it's a royal pain to fetch five or 10 of these
modules for each application and tracking whether or not they are all up to
date, I'm considering putting them all into one collection (rcsoc
a.k.a. random cross-section of code[1]) so it's easier to load, install, and
manage.

Are there better techniques for managing collections of modules in 2.4 or
later?

---eric
[1] derives from the expression that hamburger is "random cross-section of
cow"

I'm using setuptools for that. If they're somehow connected --
e.g. mathematics, database, finance, etc. -- then I create one single package
for them. If they aren't, then creating several packages isn't hard.
I already have working setup.py files and the docs indicates that it
should be a 1 liner to convert from distutils.
If they are useful enough you can publish them on PyPI and then it is just a
matter of "easy_install" them. If they aren't then you'll have to collect
them somewhere to use easy_install ;-)
I think a couple should be generaly useful (file system based queue,
union configuration files). when it all works, I'll publish.
>
It also supplies means to determine the minimum / maximum / exact version that
is required, so this also helps with how up-to-date your library has to be to
be used with some application.
a big win IMO

Mar 26 '07 #3

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