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Tools Designing large/complicated applications

P: n/a
For those of you that work on larger applications but still code in
python... do your development teams use any tools to facilitate the
design? (i'm not asking about editors here, i'm really asking about
software design tools) Are these the same tools you would use to help
engineer software in another language?

Is there anyone here who is forced to use a tool to design python
software that completely hates it? Why do you hate it?

Thanks!

-carl
--

Carl J. Van Arsdall
cv*********@mvista.com
Build and Release
MontaVista Software

Jan 12 '07 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a

Carl J. Van Arsdall wrote:
For those of you that work on larger applications but still code in
python... do your development teams use any tools to facilitate the
design? (i'm not asking about editors here, i'm really asking about
software design tools) Are these the same tools you would use to help
engineer software in another language?

Is there anyone here who is forced to use a tool to design python
software that completely hates it? Why do you hate it?

Thanks!

-carl
--

Carl J. Van Arsdall
cv*********@mvista.com
Build and Release
MontaVista Software
Our software architects use Enterprise Architect. Its probably one of
the cheaper modeling and UML design applications, but loaded with
features. They do all the use cases, analysis and design with it, then
give us the necessary flow / activity diagrams and information that we
then use to construct our python applications. It does have a python
interface (and obviously c, c#, java, php etc etc) allowing python code
to be imported for class design etc etc.

I've played with a few open source UML based tools, but unfortunately
its not one of my strengths, I leave that up to the guys that know it
well.

Jan 12 '07 #2

P: n/a
Carl,

Some well known design applications have plugins for UML<->Python
translation. For example EnterpriseArchitect
(http://www.sparxsystems.com.au/resources/mdg_tech/) has a plugin for
Python. ObjectDomain though supports it natively:
http://www.objectdomain.com/products/od/overview.do

The good thing about Python is that it is concise enough to not need
UML diagrams. Python can be used as a prototype language itself. In
other words it could take longer to draw the UML diagram than it would
take to type up a mock-up in Python. While with Java, for example, it
is very helpful to have a code generation application to take care of
all the getters and setters.

But of course if you have non-technical people who just know how to
read UML diagrams, it makes sense to invest in a good design tool.

Hope this helps,
-Nick
Carl J. Van Arsdall wrote:
For those of you that work on larger applications but still code in
python... do your development teams use any tools to facilitate the
design? (i'm not asking about editors here, i'm really asking about
software design tools) Are these the same tools you would use to help
engineer software in another language?

Is there anyone here who is forced to use a tool to design python
software that completely hates it? Why do you hate it?

Thanks!

-carl
--

Carl J. Van Arsdall
cv*********@mvista.com
Build and Release
MontaVista Software
Jan 12 '07 #3

P: n/a
Carl J. Van Arsdall a écrit :
For those of you that work on larger applications but still code in
python... do your development teams use any tools to facilitate the
design?
Yes : coffee, beer, pizzas, cigarettes, paper napkins, pen, and a good wiki.
(i'm not asking about editors here, i'm really asking about
software design tools)
<aol />
Thanks!
HTH
Jan 12 '07 #4

P: n/a
On Sat, 13 Jan 2007 00:00:20 +0100,
Bruno Desthuilliers <bd*****************@free.quelquepart.frwrote:
Carl J. Van Arsdall a écrit :
>For those of you that work on larger applications but still code in
python... do your development teams use any tools to facilitate the
design?
Yes : coffee, beer, pizzas, cigarettes, paper napkins, pen, and a good
wiki.
It is a well-known fact that the best engineering tools ever invented
are the cocktail napkin and the white board.

Regards,
Dan

--
Dan Sommers
<http://www.tombstonezero.net/dan/>
"I wish people would die in alphabetical order." -- My wife, the genealogist
Jan 13 '07 #5

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