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pyExcelerator big integer values

P: n/a
I use pyExcelerator to import some data from xml file. One column
contains integer values like:
4750456000708
4750456000715
4750456000333
....
But when I do import the pyExcelerator converts them to something like
this:
4.7504560002e+12
4.7504560007e+12
4.7504560007e+12
4.7504560003e+12

How I understand it's because the integer value is too big. If the type
of the items was string, then all would be fine, but I can't control
the file content.

The question is, how can I import the integers in normal format.

Jan 9 '07 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a
On Jan 10, 12:30 am, "Gacha" <gatis.toms...@gmail.comwrote:
I use pyExcelerator to import some data from xml file. One column
contains integer values like:
4750456000708
4750456000715
4750456000333
I think you must mean "xls", not "xml".

Those are integers only in the mathematical sense. The value of each
number cell in an XLS file is treated as a 64-bit floating point number.
How do you know that they are whole numbers? What you see on-screen with
Excel etc is not necessarily what you've got. If you format your column
with 0 decimal places, 4750456000708.123 will show as 4750456000708

However, whether they are whole numbers or not, you still have a problem
on the Python side:
...
But when I do import the pyExcelerator converts them to something like
this:
4.7504560002e+12
4.7504560007e+12
4.7504560007e+12
4.7504560003e+12
No it doesn't. It converts the XLS file data to Python float type --
64-bit floating point numbers. There is no loss of precision.

What you are seeing are different visual presentations of the *same*
object. Perhaps this will explain:

| >>for x in (4750456000708.0, 4750456000708.123):
| ... print x, str(x), repr(x)
| ...
| 4.75045600071e+012 4.75045600071e+012 4750456000708.0
| 4.75045600071e+012 4.75045600071e+012 4750456000708.123
| >>>
>
How I understand it's because the integer value is too big.
A 12-digit integer is too big for what?
If the type
of the items was string, then all would be fine, but I can't control
the file content.

The question is, how can I import the integers in normal format.
The answer is, there is no such thing as "normal format". Normality,
like beauty, is in the eye of the beholder. You have a value, how you
format it for display depends on your purpose. If what you want is to
see the most precise representation of what you've got, then use repr().

HTH,
John
Jan 10 '07 #2

P: n/a
Thank you, the repr() function helped me a lot.

v = unicode(values[(row_idx, col_idx)])
if v.endswith('e+12'):
v = repr(values[(row_idx, col_idx)])

Jan 10 '07 #3

P: n/a

Gacha wrote:
Thank you, the repr() function helped me a lot.

v = unicode(values[(row_idx, col_idx)])
if v.endswith('e+12'):
v = repr(values[(row_idx, col_idx)])
That endswith() looks rather suspicious ... what if it's +11 or +13,
and shouldn't it have a zero in it, like "+012" ??

Here's a possible replacement -- I say possible because you have been
rather coy about what you are actually trying to do.

value = values[(row_idx, col_idx)])
if isinstance(value, float):
v = repr(value)
else:
v = unicode(value)

HTH
John

Jan 10 '07 #4

P: n/a
John Machin wrote:
Here's a possible replacement -- I say possible because you have been
rather coy about what you are actually trying to do.

value = values[(row_idx, col_idx)])
if isinstance(value, float):
v = repr(value)
else:
v = unicode(value)

HTH
John
My final result:

value = values[(row_idx, col_idx)]
if isinstance(value, float) and
re.match('^\d+\.\d+e\+\d+$',unicode(value)):
v = repr(value)
else:
v = unicode(value)

Jan 16 '07 #5

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