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DOS, UNIX and tabs

P: n/a
Ben
Hi,

I have a python script on a unix system that runs fine. I have a python
script on a windows system that runs fine. Both use tabs to indent
sections of the code. I now want to run them on the same system,
actually in the same script by combining bits and pieces. But whatever
I try my windows tabs get converted to spaces when I transfer it to the
unix system and the interpreter complains that the indentation style is
not consistent throughout the file. Short of going through 350 lines of
code and manually replacing spaces with tabs what an I do? I'm thinking
there surely must be a simple solution I have missed here!

Cheers,

Ben

Dec 27 '06 #1
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35 Replies


P: n/a
Ben
I've found the unexpand command, which seems to do the trick. However,
it outputs to standard output, and I haven't worked out yet how to
capture that output to a file...

Ben

Ben wrote:
Hi,

I have a python script on a unix system that runs fine. I have a python
script on a windows system that runs fine. Both use tabs to indent
sections of the code. I now want to run them on the same system,
actually in the same script by combining bits and pieces. But whatever
I try my windows tabs get converted to spaces when I transfer it to the
unix system and the interpreter complains that the indentation style is
not consistent throughout the file. Short of going through 350 lines of
code and manually replacing spaces with tabs what an I do? I'm thinking
there surely must be a simple solution I have missed here!

Cheers,

Ben
Dec 27 '06 #2

P: n/a
On 2006-12-27, Ben <Be*************@gmail.comwrote:
I've found the unexpand command, which seems to do the trick. However,
it outputs to standard output, and I haven't worked out yet how to
capture that output to a file...
unexpand <file1 >file2

--
Grant Edwards grante Yow! Hey, LOOK!! A pair of
at SIZE 9 CAPRI PANTS!! They
visi.com probably belong to SAMMY
DAVIS, JR.!!
Dec 27 '06 #3

P: n/a
Ben
Great - that worked.Thanks!
Is that a general method in linux you can always use to redirect
standard output to a file?

Cheers,

Ben
Grant Edwards wrote:
On 2006-12-27, Ben <Be*************@gmail.comwrote:
I've found the unexpand command, which seems to do the trick. However,
it outputs to standard output, and I haven't worked out yet how to
capture that output to a file...

unexpand <file1 >file2

--
Grant Edwards grante Yow! Hey, LOOK!! A pair of
at SIZE 9 CAPRI PANTS!! They
visi.com probably belong to SAMMY
DAVIS, JR.!!
Dec 27 '06 #4

P: n/a
On 2006-12-27, Ben <Be*************@gmail.comwrote:
>>I've found the unexpand command, which seems to do the trick. However,
it outputs to standard output, and I haven't worked out yet how to
capture that output to a file...

unexpand <file1 >file2
Great - that worked.Thanks!

Is that a general method in linux you can always use to redirect
standard output to a file?
Yup. The "<" operator redirects stdin, the ">" operator
redirects stdout. "2>" redirects stderr.

--
Grant Edwards grante Yow! Let's go to CHURCH!
at
visi.com
Dec 27 '06 #5

P: n/a
Ben <Be*************@gmail.comtyped
I have a python script on a windows system that runs fine. Both use
tabs to indent sections of the code.
Just a tip for you: In python you never use tabs for indentation. The
python style guide [1] recommends four spaces per indentation level.

[1] http://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0008/

--
Freedom is always the freedom of dissenters.
(Rosa Luxemburg)
Dec 27 '06 #6

P: n/a
"Sebastian 'lunar' Wiesner" <ba***********@gmx.netwrites:
Just a tip for you: In python you never use tabs for indentation.
For some value of "you".
The python style guide [1] recommends four spaces per indentation
level.

[1] http://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0008/
It's not quite absolute on the topic:

For new projects, spaces-only are strongly recommended over tabs.

--
\ "I filled my humidifier with wax. Now my room is all shiny." |
`\ -- Steven Wright |
_o__) |
Ben Finney

Dec 27 '06 #7

P: n/a
At Wednesday 27/12/2006 20:09, Ben Finney wrote:
The python style guide [1] recommends four spaces per indentation
level.

[1] http://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0008/

It's not quite absolute on the topic:

For new projects, spaces-only are strongly recommended over tabs.
Of course you can do it anyway you like, but you should have a
*strong* reason for not following a *strong* recommendation.
(Just a note, you can use untabify.py (inside the Tools dir) to
convert tabs to spaces, instead of unexpand)
--
Gabriel Genellina
Softlab SRL


__________________________________________________
PreguntŠ. Respondť. DescubrŪ.
Todo lo que querŪas saber, y lo que ni imaginabas,
estŠ en Yahoo! Respuestas (Beta).
°Probalo ya!
http://www.yahoo.com.ar/respuestas

Dec 28 '06 #8

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"Ben Finney" <bi****************@benfinney.id.auwrote in message
news:ma***************************************@pyt hon.org...
"Sebastian 'lunar' Wiesner" <ba***********@gmx.netwrites:
Just a tip for you: In python you never use tabs for indentation.

For some value of "you".
The python style guide [1] recommends four spaces per indentation
level.

[1] http://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0008/

It's not quite absolute on the topic:

For new projects, spaces-only are strongly recommended over tabs.
Even if were, read the Introduction. This is a coding standard intended
to apply to code which is going to checked in as part of the core python
build, not all Python! It's probably a pretty good standard to be following
in general, but come on... If Guido really wanted this enforced across the
board he could simply call anything that doesn't meet this standard to the
letter a SyntaxError and just stop there. For example, the standard states:

- Imports should usually be on separate lines, e.g.:

Yes: import os
import sys

No: import sys, os
>>import sys, os
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in ?
ImportError: Sorry, only one module per import line!
I'm sure that's not Guido's intention. ;)

-ej
Dec 28 '06 #9

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On Wed, 27 Dec 2006 20:15:33 +0100, Sebastian 'lunar' Wiesner wrote:
Ben <Be*************@gmail.comtyped
>I have a python script on a windows system that runs fine. Both use
tabs to indent sections of the code.

Just a tip for you: In python you never use tabs for indentation. The
python style guide [1] recommends four spaces per indentation level.

[1] http://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0008/
[obligatory pot-shot in the never-ending spaces versus tabs war]

In Python, I frequently use tabs for indentation, and I never have any
trouble *except* when posting code to Usenet, where other people's news
readers can't cope with tabs.

But I think we all agree that mixing tabs and spaces is A Very Bad Thing.

--
Steven D'Aprano

Dec 28 '06 #10

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"Erik Johnson" <ej at somewhere.com<typed
>
"Ben Finney" <bi****************@benfinney.id.auwrote in message
news:ma***************************************@pyt hon.org...
>"Sebastian 'lunar' Wiesner" <ba***********@gmx.netwrites:
Just a tip for you: In python you never use tabs for indentation.

For some value of "you".
The python style guide [1] recommends four spaces per indentation
level.

[1] http://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0008/

It's not quite absolute on the topic:

For new projects, spaces-only are strongly recommended over tabs.

Even if were, read the Introduction. This is a coding standard
intended
to apply to code which is going to checked in as part of the core
python
build, not all Python! It's probably a pretty good standard to be
following in general, but come on...
It is, and especially the problems with tabs shows you, why it is good
practice to follow the standard in your own code, too...
--
Freedom is always the freedom of dissenters.
(Rosa Luxemburg)
Dec 28 '06 #11

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On Thu, 28 Dec 2006 09:26:28 +0100, Sebastian 'lunar' Wiesner wrote:
It is, and especially the problems with tabs shows you, why it is good
practice to follow the standard in your own code, too...
I don't know what "problems" with tabs you are talking about. I never have
problems with tabs. *Other people* who choose to use software that doesn't
understand tabs have problems.

I've spent a lot of time reading both sides of the tabs versus spaces
argument, and I haven't found anything yet that explains why tabs are, in
and of themselves, bad.
--
Steven D'Aprano

Dec 28 '06 #12

P: n/a
Steven D'Aprano wrote:
On Thu, 28 Dec 2006 09:26:28 +0100, Sebastian 'lunar' Wiesner wrote:
>It is, and especially the problems with tabs shows you, why it is good
practice to follow the standard in your own code, too...

I don't know what "problems" with tabs you are talking about. I never have
problems with tabs. *Other people* who choose to use software that doesn't
understand tabs have problems.

I've spent a lot of time reading both sides of the tabs versus spaces
argument, and I haven't found anything yet that explains why tabs are, in
and of themselves, bad.
You gave the reason in your post : because other people who are using
software that doesn't understand tabs as YOU expect them to have problems
with your code.

Tabs aren't a problem at all as long as nobody else than you edit your code.
Dec 28 '06 #13

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Steven D'Aprano <st***@REMOVEME.cybersource.com.autyped
On Thu, 28 Dec 2006 09:26:28 +0100, Sebastian 'lunar' Wiesner wrote:
>It is, and especially the problems with tabs shows you, why it is
good practice to follow the standard in your own code, too...

I don't know what "problems" with tabs you are talking about. I never
have problems with tabs. *Other people* who choose to use software
that doesn't understand tabs have problems.
Mmmh, maybe you never worked together with a team of other programmers
or have such a high position, that you can afford to ignore complaints
of your co-workers...

--
Freedom is always the freedom of dissenters.
(Rosa Luxemburg)
Dec 28 '06 #14

P: n/a
Sebastian 'lunar' Wiesner schrieb:
Ben <Be*************@gmail.comtyped
>I have a python script on a windows system that runs fine. Both use
tabs to indent sections of the code.

Just a tip for you: In python you never use tabs for indentation. The
python style guide [1] recommends four spaces per indentation level.

[1] http://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0008/
I like using tabs. And the style guide doesn't give a reason why one
shouldn't and neither does the thread
http://www.python.org/search/hyperma...94q2/0198.html in the
archive.
So what's the point in typing four spaces for indentation instead of one
tab?
Dec 28 '06 #15

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Christophe Cavalaria schrieb:
Steven D'Aprano wrote:
You gave the reason in your post : because other people who are using
software that doesn't understand tabs as YOU expect them to have problems
with your code.

Tabs aren't a problem at all as long as nobody else than you edit your code.
Sorry, but that's a silly argument. With the same argument we should
stop using python alltogether since the usual MBA will understand
nothing but VBA.
Dec 28 '06 #16

P: n/a
Felix Benner wrote:
Christophe Cavalaria schrieb:
>Steven D'Aprano wrote:
>You gave the reason in your post : because other people who are using
software that doesn't understand tabs as YOU expect them to have problems
with your code.

Tabs aren't a problem at all as long as nobody else than you edit your
code.

Sorry, but that's a silly argument. With the same argument we should
stop using python alltogether since the usual MBA will understand
nothing but VBA.
No it isn't. If you have to work with some MBA that understands nothing but
VBA, why the hell are you writing Python code in the first place?

Dec 28 '06 #17

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Felix Benner <fe**********@imail.dewrote:
So what's the point in typing four spaces for indentation instead of one
tab?
So long as you always use only tabs there is no problem. So long as you
only use spaces there is no problem. If you mix tabs and spaces you can
introduce bugs. In particular, some people set their editor up to expand 1
tab to the next multiple of 4 spaces on their screen, but the usual
convention for tabs (and one that Python follows internally) is that tabs
expand to the next multiple of 8 spaces.

Usually when you mix spaces and tabs what you get either works the way you
intend, or it generates a syntax error. Once however when this recurring
question popped up I did a search through a load of Python files and
actually found once instance of some code which had been released and ran
whether tabs were expanded to 4 or 8 space boundaries. Reading that code it
was apparent that it had been written using 4 space tabs on the screen, but
that when it ran it did something different than had been intended.

So, given that mixing tabs and spaces is deadly choose one or the other and
stick to it. If you intend to work with other people then choose the same
convention as they use. If you are never going to work with others then use
whichever scheme makes you most comfortable.

Be careful as not all open source projects use the same convention: in
previous discussions on this newsgroup there were people arguing quite
strongly for using the tab convention. A straw poll indicated that there
was 1 open source project with 3 developers using tabs, and all other open
source projects use spaces only as the stated (but not always strictly
enforced) convention. Your experience may of course differ.

Of course nobody in their right minds actually types 4 spaces for
indentation: they use an editor where if the automatic indentation
isn't correct then hitting the tab key inserts the correct number of spaces
(and with luck where hitting the backspace key deletes back to the previous
tabstop).
Dec 28 '06 #18

P: n/a
In <en**********@registered.motzarella.org>, Felix Benner wrote:
I like using tabs. And the style guide doesn't give a reason why one
shouldn't and neither does the thread
http://www.python.org/search/hyperma...94q2/0198.html in the
archive.
So what's the point in typing four spaces for indentation instead of one
tab?
You don't need to type four spaces. Every decent editor lets you use the
Tab key and inserts the proper amount of spaces for you. Same for
Backspace removing the proper amount of spaces to get to the previous
"tab stop".

There are plenty of "reasons" from both sides. This is a religious issue,
so please search the net for answers and don't start another
flam^H^H^H^Hdebate here. Please!

Ciao,
Marc 'BlackJack' Rintsch
Dec 28 '06 #19

P: n/a
On 2006-12-28, Steven D'Aprano <st***@REMOVEME.cybersource.com.auwrote:
I've spent a lot of time reading both sides of the tabs versus spaces
argument, and I haven't found anything yet that explains why tabs are, in
and of themselves, bad.
They aren't. Using tabs isn't bad. Using both tabs and spaces
is bad, so the people managing the official Python source tree
picked one. Maybe they've got reasons for liking spaces over
tabs. Maybe they just flipped a coin. It doens't matter. What
matters is picking one and sticking with it.

--
Grant Edwards grante Yow! YOU'D cry too if it
at happened to YOU!!
visi.com
Dec 28 '06 #20

P: n/a
On 2006-12-28, Felix Benner <fe**********@imail.dewrote:
I like using tabs. And the style guide doesn't give a reason
why one shouldn't and neither does the thread
http://www.python.org/search/hyperma...94q2/0198.html
in the archive. So what's the point in typing four spaces for
indentation instead of one tab?
So that the whole Python source tree is consistent.

--
Grant Edwards grante Yow! What I want to find
at out is -- do parrots know
visi.com much about Astro-Turf?
Dec 28 '06 #21

P: n/a
Marc 'BlackJack' Rintsch <bj****@gmx.nettyped
In <en**********@registered.motzarella.org>, Felix Benner wrote:
>I like using tabs. And the style guide doesn't give a reason why one
shouldn't and neither does the thread
http://www.python.org/search/hyperma...94q2/0198.html in the
archive.
This is a religious issue
It is, because god itself used four spaces for indentation when he wrote
his "world" project in seven days ;)

--
Freedom is always the freedom of dissenters.
(Rosa Luxemburg)
Dec 28 '06 #22

P: n/a
Steven D'Aprano wrote:
I don't know what "problems" with tabs you are talking about. I never have
problems with tabs. *Other people* who choose to use software that doesn't
understand tabs have problems.

I've spent a lot of time reading both sides of the tabs versus spaces
argument, and I haven't found anything yet that explains why tabs are, in
and of themselves, bad.
Indeed. In fact, I came to the conclusion several years ago that tabs
are in better for formatting code because then different people on the
team can have their preferred tabstop width, be it 8, 4, or 2 spaces.
Ironically, it has always seemed to me then that tabs are superior for
python editing, since mixing tabs and spaces in an environment like this
means that stuff won't run, whereas in C it'll still compile even if the
code looks awful.
-tom!

--
Dec 28 '06 #23

P: n/a
Steven D'Aprano wrote:
But I think we all agree that mixing tabs and spaces is A Very Bad Thing.
I like mixing tabs and spaces, actually. Tabs for indentation, and
additional spaces to make the code "look pretty". Somebody please tell
me why this is bad and I'll stop.

class Apple(object):
def contrived_example_function(self, argument1, argument2,
argument3, argument4):
print "hello, world"

Apparently, emacs in python mode follows this convention, too. I like it
because I get the best of both worlds: the only thing against using
tabs-only-indentation is that wrapping long lines can be quite ugly,
while space-only-indentation allows for beautifying it somewhat by
lining up the columns to match. Tabs+spaces allows the "lining up" with
spaces to be explicitly separate from indentation.

--
pkm ~ http://paulmcnett.com

Dec 30 '06 #24

P: n/a
"Ben" <Be*************@gmail.comwrote:
>
Great - that worked.Thanks!
Is that a general method in linux you can always use to redirect
standard output to a file?
Works in Windows, too.
--
Tim Roberts, ti**@probo.com
Providenza & Boekelheide, Inc.
Dec 30 '06 #25

P: n/a
Paul McNett <p@ulmcnett.comtyped
Steven D'Aprano wrote:
>But I think we all agree that mixing tabs and spaces is A Very Bad
Thing.

I like mixing tabs and spaces, actually. Tabs for indentation, and
additional spaces to make the code "look pretty". Somebody please tell
me why this is bad and I'll stop.

class Apple(object):
def contrived_example_function(self, argument1, argument2,
argument3, argument4):
print "hello, world"

Apparently, emacs in python mode follows this convention, too.
That doesn't seem like a standard settings to me. I can't remember
changing the indentation settings for python, nonetheless my gnu emacs
uses four spaces for indentation. Placing wrapped lines into ordered
columns is done by inserting additional spaces. This all happens
automatically; you never need to insert spaces manually...
I like it because I get the best of both worlds: the only thing
against using tabs-only-indentation is that wrapping long lines can be
quite ugly, while space-only-indentation allows for beautifying it
somewhat by lining up the columns to match.
Did you try to open your code files with another editor, which has a
different length for tabulator chars? It would look quite ugly, I
guess...

--
Freedom is always the freedom of dissenters.
(Rosa Luxemburg)
Dec 30 '06 #26

P: n/a
Sebastian 'lunar' Wiesner wrote:
Paul McNett <p@ulmcnett.comtyped
>Steven D'Aprano wrote:
>>But I think we all agree that mixing tabs and spaces is A Very Bad
Thing.
I like mixing tabs and spaces, actually. Tabs for indentation, and
additional spaces to make the code "look pretty". Somebody please tell
me why this is bad and I'll stop.

class Apple(object):
def contrived_example_function(self, argument1, argument2,
argument3, argument4):
print "hello, world"

Apparently, emacs in python mode follows this convention, too.

That doesn't seem like a standard settings to me. I can't remember
changing the indentation settings for python, nonetheless my gnu emacs
uses four spaces for indentation. Placing wrapped lines into ordered
columns is done by inserting additional spaces. This all happens
automatically; you never need to insert spaces manually...
I never tried emacs, but somebody once told me that if you have set
indentation-by-tab, it will indent with tabs but insert additional
spaces in wrapped lines to look pretty.

>I like it because I get the best of both worlds: the only thing
against using tabs-only-indentation is that wrapping long lines can be
quite ugly, while space-only-indentation allows for beautifying it
somewhat by lining up the columns to match.

Did you try to open your code files with another editor, which has a
different length for tabulator chars? It would look quite ugly, I
guess...
Actually, no. Everyone can choose their own number of spaces-per-tab and
it'll look right, as long as everyone uses a monospace font.

--
pkm ~ http://paulmcnett.com
Dec 30 '06 #27

P: n/a
In <ma***************************************@python. org>, Paul McNett
wrote:
>Did you try to open your code files with another editor, which has a
different length for tabulator chars? It would look quite ugly, I
guess...

Actually, no. Everyone can choose their own number of spaces-per-tab and
it'll look right, as long as everyone uses a monospace font.
You never tried that with tabs plus additional spaces to line up e.g.
arguments that are broken across lines, right?

And there are a number of environments where you can't change the length
of a tab like email or terminals where code will be displayed from time to
time for example as diffs from a version control system.

Ciao,
Marc 'BlackJack' Rintsch
Dec 31 '06 #28

P: n/a
In message <pa****************************@gmx.net>, Marc 'BlackJack'
Rintsch wrote:
In <ma***************************************@python. org>, Paul McNett
wrote:
>Everyone can choose their own number of spaces-per-tab and
it'll look right, as long as everyone uses a monospace font.

You never tried that with tabs plus additional spaces to line up e.g.
arguments that are broken across lines, right?
I prefer a more two-dimensional layout, keeping consistent indentation. To
illustrate using the example from Paul McNett:

class Apple(object):
¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*def contrived_example_function \
(
self,
argument1,
argument2,
argument3,
argument4
) :
¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬*¬* print "hello, world"
#end contrived_example_function
#end Apple

Dec 31 '06 #29

P: n/a
Marc 'BlackJack' Rintsch wrote:
Did you try to open your code files with another editor, which has a
different length for tabulator chars? It would look quite ugly, I
guess...
Actually, no. Everyone can choose their own number of spaces-per-tab and
it'll look right, as long as everyone uses a monospace font.

You never tried that with tabs plus additional spaces to line up e.g.
arguments that are broken across lines, right?
You must not understand what they're talking about, because it works
fine.

The example is this:

"""\
class Foo:
\tdef Function():
\t\tAnotherFunctionThatTakesManyArguments(arg1,
\t\t arg2,
\t\t arg3)
"""
And there are a number of environments where you can't change the length
of a tab like email or terminals where code will be displayed from time to
time for example as diffs from a version control system.
That's the point of doing it in this way with tabs to specify indent
level and spaces to specify tabular alignment.

Me, I could never get emacs's python stuff to work suitably so I just
use a Dead Simple Editor (SciTE) in which I use tabs exclusively;
continuation indents are always exactly one additional tab over the
thing that's being continued.

Perhaps interestingly, for development I have my editor set to show tabs
as fairly short, but my diff program shows them as eight characters. I
find that makes indentation changes easier to spot in the diffs.
-tom!

--
Jan 1 '07 #30

P: n/a
In message <ro********************************@4ax.com>, Tom Plunket wrote:
Perhaps interestingly, for development I have my editor set to show tabs
as fairly short, but my diff program shows them as eight characters. I
find that makes indentation changes easier to spot in the diffs.
I think there should be a single environment variable, perhaps
called "TABS", which specifies the tab settings across all relevant tools
that work with text, including less and diff. So for example setting this
as

export TABS=4

will cause these tools to treat tabs as equivalent to stepping to the next
multiple of four columns from the start of the line.
Jan 1 '07 #31

P: n/a
Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
I think there should be a single environment variable, perhaps
called "TABS", which specifies the tab settings across all relevant tools
that work with text, including less and diff. So for example setting this
as

export TABS=4

will cause these tools to treat tabs as equivalent to stepping to the next
multiple of four columns from the start of the line.
Maybe I'm also weird, but I use a variable-pitch font when programming
in Python. So a "tab equals some number of spaces" really isn't useful
to me. My setup is, "tab equals this much space".
-tom!

--
Jan 1 '07 #32

P: n/a
On 1/1/07, Tom Plunket <to***@fancy.orgwrote:
Maybe I'm also weird, but I use a variable-pitch font when programming
in Python. So a "tab equals some number of spaces" really isn't useful
to me. My setup is, "tab equals this much space".
A year ago I would have thought you were weird, but after reading a
post by Ed Leafe, one of the creators of Dabo about using proportional
fonts for readability, I thought I'd try it out, thinking that it was
pretty wacky. Turns out that after a very brief adjustment period, I
liked it! I've been using proportional fonts ever since, and have
found only one drawback: code that is indented with spaces looks
butt-ugly. I'm glad I switched to tabs for my code.

--

# p.d.
Jan 2 '07 #33

P: n/a
On 2007-01-02, Peter Decker <py******@gmail.comwrote:
On 1/1/07, Tom Plunket <to***@fancy.orgwrote:
>Maybe I'm also weird, but I use a variable-pitch font when
programming in Python. So a "tab equals some number of
spaces" really isn't useful to me. My setup is, "tab equals
this much space".

A year ago I would have thought you were weird, but after
reading a post by Ed Leafe, one of the creators of Dabo about
using proportional fonts for readability, I thought I'd try it
out, thinking that it was pretty wacky. Turns out that after a
very brief adjustment period, I liked it! I've been using
proportional fonts ever since, and have found only one
drawback: code that is indented with spaces looks butt-ugly.
I'm glad I switched to tabs for my code.
I first came accross it in Stroustrup's _The C++ Programming
Language_. I liked the look and the idea immediately, but my
editor of choice (by historical accident) Vim, doesn't yet
support it.

--
Neil Cerutti
I've had a wonderful evening, but this wasn't it. --Groucho Marx
Jan 2 '07 #34

P: n/a
Peter Decker wrote:
Maybe I'm also weird, but I use a variable-pitch font when programming
in Python. So a "tab equals some number of spaces" really isn't useful
to me. My setup is, "tab equals this much space".

A year ago I would have thought you were weird, but after reading a
post by Ed Leafe, one of the creators of Dabo about using proportional
fonts for readability, I thought I'd try it out, thinking that it was
pretty wacky. Turns out that after a very brief adjustment period, I
liked it!
Yep, I had a similar experience although a bit more forced. The editor
that I was using was configured out-of-the-box with variable-pitch, and
I didn't want to bother figuring out how to change it for the quickie
stuff I was writing, then eventually I found that it no longer bothered
me...
-tom!

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Jan 3 '07 #35

P: n/a
Tim Roberts wrote:
"Ben" <Be*************@gmail.comwrote:
>Great - that worked.Thanks!
Is that a general method in linux you can always use to redirect
standard output to a file?

Works in Windows, too.
For some value of "work" :)

regards
Steve
--
Steve Holden +44 150 684 7255 +1 800 494 3119
Holden Web LLC/Ltd http://www.holdenweb.com
Skype: holdenweb http://del.icio.us/steve.holden
Blog of Note: http://holdenweb.blogspot.com

Jan 26 '07 #36

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