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why would anyone use python when java is there?

P: n/a
wtf

Nov 29 '06 #1
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18 Replies


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In article <11*********************@h54g2000cwb.googlegroups. com>,
gavino <bo******@yahoo.comwrote:
>
wtf
Because programming in Python makes me feel happy and contented, while
programming in Java just makes me want to scream in agony.
--
Aahz (aa**@pythoncraft.com) <* http://www.pythoncraft.com/

Usenet is not a democracy. It is a weird cross between an anarchy and a
dictatorship.
Nov 29 '06 #2

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Aahz wrote:
In article <11*********************@h54g2000cwb.googlegroups. com>,
gavino <bo******@yahoo.comwrote:
>wtf

Because programming in Python makes me feel happy and contented, while
programming in Java just makes me want to scream in agony.
Or in my case, Python made me code, Java made me brew java.
ymmv

--
mph
Nov 29 '06 #3

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gavino wrote:
wtf
You have to be trolling I would think. For most people I think they
would like to code in Python if they had a personal choice. But for
professional reasons they are likely forced to code in Java because of
the sheep mentality of the large corporate drone-dom that's out there.
To me, languages such as Smalltalk, Python, and Ruby allow the problems
to solve themselves in code that's easier to read and requires less
verbiage. Meanwhile all of Java's semicolons, curly braces, and
syntactical hoops leaves my fingers tired and my eyes crossed.

Nov 29 '06 #4

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gavino wrote:
wtf
Java is a coffee, and coffee comes from exploited Ethiopians (they do
have some damn fine coffee, though). Most of us prefer to exploit
Englishmen instead. (damn them and their humor!)

-smithj
Nov 29 '06 #5

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functional programming, list comprehensions, decorators, duck typing,
generators, dynamism, introspection, prettier code, simpler grammar
[see digg and /. for the graphs], and, of course, the trolls.

gavino wrote:
wtf
Nov 29 '06 #6

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gregarican wrote:
gavino wrote:
wtf

You have to be trolling I would think.
Yeah, gavino has been trolling comp.lang.lisp for quite some time. For
the life of me I can't understand why he would troll comp.lang.python
when comp.lang.lisp is there.

-Adam

Nov 29 '06 #7

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He trolls other groups as well. Smalltalk for example -->
http://groups.google.com/group/comp....7227555661a2cd.
There are at least a dozen recent posts where he asks some obvious
trollling line of questioning...

Adam Jones wrote:
gregarican wrote:
gavino wrote:
wtf
You have to be trolling I would think.

Yeah, gavino has been trolling comp.lang.lisp for quite some time. For
the life of me I can't understand why he would troll comp.lang.python
when comp.lang.lisp is there.

-Adam
Nov 29 '06 #8

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Score: -1 (Flamebait)

gavino escreveu:
wtf
Nov 29 '06 #9

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gregarican wrote:
gavino wrote:
wtf

You have to be trolling I would think. For most people I think they
would like to code in Python if they had a personal choice. But for
professional reasons they are likely forced to code in Java because of
the sheep mentality of the large corporate drone-dom that's out there.
To me, languages such as Smalltalk, Python, and Ruby allow the problems
to solve themselves in code that's easier to read and requires less
verbiage. Meanwhile all of Java's semicolons, curly braces, and
syntactical hoops leaves my fingers tired and my eyes crossed.
I want to learn to program and I can't seem to pick a direction. A
java guy I know makes a lot of $, but a lot of reading I have done
shows lisp smalltalk and haskell to be really nice, as well as of
course python. It seems python is 4/5 way to lisp yet has a lot of
people using it for practical things. I also hear that it dominates in
leaving readable code behind it. Am I listening to too much marketing
from non dominant tools? I hear again and again how java is just
putrid. My instict says learn something like scheme but my smal
experience sees only java people making money.. aggkk!!

Nov 30 '06 #10

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[Adam]
For the life of me I can't understand why he would troll
comp.lang.python when comp.lang.lisp is there.
+1 QOTW!

--
Richie Hindle
ri****@entrian.com
Nov 30 '06 #11

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gavino escreveu:
I want to learn to program and I can't seem to pick a direction. A
java guy I know makes a lot of $, but a lot of reading I have done
shows lisp smalltalk and haskell to be really nice, as well as of
course python. It seems python is 4/5 way to lisp yet has a lot of
people using it for practical things. I also hear that it dominates in
leaving readable code behind it. Am I listening to too much marketing
from non dominant tools? I hear again and again how java is just
putrid. My instict says learn something like scheme but my smal
experience sees only java people making money.. aggkk!!
You are going in the wrong direction. I've seen lots of "Java guys" in
the business for money. However, they are mediocre programmers and will
always be.

If you are serious about getting a programming career, you should not
be afraid to learn both Java and Python, perhaps C, Ruby, Lisp. They
are tools, and more knowledge never hurts.

For now, there are more Java (and .NET) offers. But things might
change.
Stephen

Nov 30 '06 #12

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Richie Hindle wrote:
[Adam]
For the life of me I can't understand why he would troll
comp.lang.python when comp.lang.lisp is there.

+1 QOTW!
Overruled! ;-)

Mostly because comp.lang.lisp seems to have become a much better place
to get quotes of the week about Python than comp.lang.python itself. If
there was a meta-QOTW or something like that then perhaps a +1 would be
deserved. :-)

Paul

Nov 30 '06 #13

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[Adam]
For the life of me I can't understand why he would troll
comp.lang.python when comp.lang.lisp is there.
[Richie]
+1 QOTW!
[Paul]
Overruled! ;-)

Mostly because comp.lang.lisp seems to have become a much better place
to get quotes of the week about Python than comp.lang.python itself.
Point taken... but had Adam said "For the life of me I can't understand why
he would troll comp.lang.python when the rest of usenet is there" I would
have still voted QOTW. It was a pro-comp.lang.python vote, not an
anti-comp.lang.lisp vote. 8-)

--
Richie Hindle
ri****@entrian.com
Nov 30 '06 #14

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On Nov 30, 3:19 am, "gavino" <booti...@yahoo.comwrote:
I want to learn to program and I can't seem to pick a direction. A
java guy I know makes a lot of $, but a lot of reading I have done
shows lisp smalltalk and haskell to be really nice, as well as of
course python. It seems python is 4/5 way to lisp yet has a lot of
This may be a troll, but it's a chance for me to make a good point. I
love making a point...

If you're serious about learning to program, you're thinking of it the
wrong way. You need to learn HOW to program, which is independent of
knowing a particular language or environment. In that sense it doesn't
matter what language you start with. That said, Python is an excellent
teaching language due to its combination of simplicity and power.

If you're going to be a professional programmer, you should learn as
many different languages as you can. Each brings its own "mindset" to
programming, and by learning the language you gain skills and concepts
that are applicable even when you're using a different language.

Nov 30 '06 #15

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Bruce Eckel states the case pretty well in this interview:

http://www.artima.com/intv/aboutme.html

Bruce is the author of "Thinking In Java" and other excellent books,
but has migrated from the Java camp. (I'm excited to see him getting at
least a bit involved in TurboGears. He has a lot to offer any project
in which he takes an interest.)

I find his opinions particularly relevant.

I've tried doing the Java thing, mainly because of the hype surrounding
it... and the marketability. But I never got very far because I just
disliked the language. (Personal opinion. But hey, this *is*
comp.lang.python!)

Nov 30 '06 #16

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gavino wrote:
I want to learn to program and I can't seem to pick a direction. A
Learning how to program and learning a programming language are
completely different things.

The former far more difficult then the latter. There is nothing better
than Python to learn how to program because it is simple and lets you
focus on modeling the problem.
experience sees only java people making money.. aggkk!!
Nonsense, learning languages is easy, going from Python to Java is easy
(but annoying of course)
Worry about learning how to program, later you can pick any language
you think migh make you rich.

i.

Nov 30 '06 #17

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I would recommend learning one language out of each of three potential
groups. Just my $0.02 USD:

1) Larger commercial languages - Java, C++, C#.
2) Fun, productive scripting languages - Python, Ruby
3) Academic languages - C, Lisp, Haskell, Smalltalk

This doesn't mean that Python can't be a larger commercial language, or
that C is only used for teaching purposes. Perhaps these are too broad
of generalizations. But these are three different areas of interest and
having at least one language under your belt in each area would look
good on a resume.

Of course learning _how_ to program in practice is of huge importance.
There are lots of books out there which give examples in several
different languages of how to apply theoretical concepts to your craft.
Although all of these languages aren't inherently object oriented you
can apply such concepts to them to one degree or another to make your
problem solving a little more practical and logical...

Stephen Eilert wrote:
>
If you are serious about getting a programming career, you should not
be afraid to learn both Java and Python, perhaps C, Ruby, Lisp. They
are tools, and more knowledge never hurts.
Nov 30 '06 #18

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may I, as a former Englishman, say how proud we always were to be
exploited by our betters

many thanks guv

Mark

Jonathan Smith wrote:
gavino wrote:
wtf

Java is a coffee, and coffee comes from exploited Ethiopians (they do
have some damn fine coffee, though). Most of us prefer to exploit
Englishmen instead. (damn them and their humor!)

-smithj
Dec 1 '06 #19

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