By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
455,446 Members | 1,623 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 455,446 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

python under the hood

P: n/a
Hello.

Is there any good information about python's internals and semantic? I
mean "under the hood".
For example, I want to understant what do these strings

x = 10
y = 10
x = 20

mean (memory allocation for object? ctors? etc.)
Unfortynatly, I'm too lazy to read python's source code :) (and I
guess, it's not very easy :) )

Oct 20 '06 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
3 Replies


P: n/a
tp*****@mail.ru wrote:
Is there any good information about python's internals and semantic? I
mean "under the hood".
For example, I want to understant what do these strings

x = 10
y = 10
x = 20

mean (memory allocation for object? ctors? etc.)
reading this might help:

http://effbot.org/zone/python-objects.htm

</F>

Oct 20 '06 #2

P: n/a
On 2006-10-20, tp*****@mail.ru <tp*****@mail.ruwrote:
Hello.

Is there any good information about python's internals and semantic? I
mean "under the hood".
Not exactly 'under the hood', but very close is the Python/C API.
You can learn a great deal by reading the Extending&Embedding manual as well as
the Python/C API reference manual.
Unfortynatly, I'm too lazy to read python's source code :) (and I
guess, it's not very easy :) )
After the above, some parts should be familiar. The functions in the Python/C
API are also being used inside Python.

I also found the source code pretty understandable, although I read only a
small part of it.

Albert
Oct 20 '06 #3

P: n/a
tp*****@mail.ru wrote:
Hello.

Is there any good information about python's internals and semantic? I
mean "under the hood".
For example, I want to understant what do these strings

x = 10
y = 10
x = 20

mean (memory allocation for object? ctors? etc.)
Unfortynatly, I'm too lazy to read python's source code :) (and I
guess, it's not very easy :) )
I found both Learning Python and Python in a Nutshell (both O'Reilly) to
be really good at covering some of the details of what's happening in
the language. Assuming you want to read whole books about it! :)
Oct 20 '06 #4

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.