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hundreds of seconds?

P: n/a
Hi all

How can I access partial seconds on the system clock?

I measure air speed and water flow in a heat-exchanger test stand and
count pulses from both water meter and air speed meter. I divide the
amount of these counts over a certain interval with the time of that
interval. Since I only have seconds, I need to wait 100 seconds for may
calculation is I want a precision of 1%.

The radiator fan that I use can't stand these long intervals, 'cause I
run it with 24V and 50 Amps to get decent airflow (10m/s) through my
heat exchanger.

Again: how do I get the hundreds of seconds from the system clock?

In Pascal it was: GetTime( Hr1, Min1, Sec1, cSec1); (yes, I'm that
old).

---
ir EE van Andel eu*@fiwihex.nl www.fiwihex.nl
Fiwihex B.V. Wierdensestraat 74, NL7604BK Almelo, Netherlands
tel+31-546-491106 fax+31-546-491107

Oct 11 '06 #1
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3 Replies


P: n/a
eu***********@gmail.com wrote:
Hi all

How can I access partial seconds on the system clock?

I measure air speed and water flow in a heat-exchanger test stand and
count pulses from both water meter and air speed meter. I divide the
amount of these counts over a certain interval with the time of that
interval. Since I only have seconds, I need to wait 100 seconds for may
calculation is I want a precision of 1%.

The radiator fan that I use can't stand these long intervals, 'cause I
run it with 24V and 50 Amps to get decent airflow (10m/s) through my
heat exchanger.

Again: how do I get the hundreds of seconds from the system clock?

In Pascal it was: GetTime( Hr1, Min1, Sec1, cSec1); (yes, I'm that
old).
time.time() returns the system time in seconds since the epoch (1970). The
fractional part is relevant.

However, be aware that your OS may limit the precision here. I'm not sure,
but I think Windows for example doesn't get faster than 10th or 100th of a
second.

For more precise timing, you might need a special library/extension that
works with the cpu timer register or something like that.

Diez
Oct 11 '06 #2

P: n/a
"Diez B. Roggisch" <de***@nospam.web.dewrote:
However, be aware that your OS may limit the precision here. I'm not
sure, but I think Windows for example doesn't get faster than 10th or
100th of a second.
1/100th of a second.
>
For more precise timing, you might need a special library/extension
that works with the cpu timer register or something like that.
Or in Windows case just call time.clock() instead.
Oct 11 '06 #3

P: n/a

python's time is as old as glibc's time(). A more clear interface as
Java should be implements! though i'm not has the ability to do this.
maybe some "volenties" could do out the favor.
On Oct 11, 10:38 pm, eur.van.an...@gmail.com wrote:
Hi all

How can I access partial seconds on the system clock?

I measure air speed and water flow in a heat-exchanger test stand and
count pulses from both water meter and air speed meter. I divide the
amount of these counts over a certain interval with the time of that
interval. Since I only have seconds, I need to wait 100 seconds for may
calculation is I want a precision of 1%.

The radiator fan that I use can't stand these long intervals, 'cause I
run it with 24V and 50 Amps to get decent airflow (10m/s) through my
heat exchanger.

Again: how do I get the hundreds of seconds from the system clock?

In Pascal it was: GetTime( Hr1, Min1, Sec1, cSec1); (yes, I'm that
old).

---
ir EE van Andel e...@fiwihex.nlwww.fiwihex.nl
Fiwihex B.V. Wierdensestraat 74, NL7604BK Almelo, Netherlands
tel+31-546-491106 fax+31-546-491107
Oct 12 '06 #4

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