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How to let a loop run for a while before checking for break condition?

P: n/a

Sometimes it is known in advance, that the time spent in a loop will be
in order of minutes or even hours, so it makes sense to optimize each
element in the loop to make it run faster.
One of instructions which can sure be optimized away is the check for
the break condition, at least within the time where it is known that the
loop will not reach it.

Any idea how to write such a loop?

e.g.

counter = 2*64

while counter(BUT DON'T CHECK IT THE FIRST ONE HOUR LONG):
... do something ... # and decrease the counter

Thanks for any hint, but in particular if related to timers on the
Windows 2000/XP system I am mainly working with.

What do you think about this idea? Does it make sense?

Claudio Grondi
Aug 27 '06 #1
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16 Replies


P: n/a
Claudio Grondi schrieb:
>
Sometimes it is known in advance, that the time spent in a loop will be
in order of minutes or even hours, so it makes sense to optimize each
element in the loop to make it run faster.
One of instructions which can sure be optimized away is the check for
the break condition, at least within the time where it is known that the
loop will not reach it.

Any idea how to write such a loop?

e.g.

counter = 2*64

while counter(BUT DON'T CHECK IT THE FIRST ONE HOUR LONG):
now = time.time()
while time.time() - now < 3600.0 or some_other_condition:
...
The short circuiting of the or will prevent the execution of
some_other_condition.
... do something ... # and decrease the counter

Thanks for any hint, but in particular if related to timers on the
Windows 2000/XP system I am mainly working with.

What do you think about this idea? Does it make sense?

What idea?

Diez
Aug 27 '06 #2

P: n/a
Diez B. Roggisch wrote:
Claudio Grondi schrieb:
>>
Sometimes it is known in advance, that the time spent in a loop will
be in order of minutes or even hours, so it makes sense to optimize
each element in the loop to make it run faster.
One of instructions which can sure be optimized away is the check for
the break condition, at least within the time where it is known that
the loop will not reach it.

Any idea how to write such a loop?

e.g.

counter = 2*64

while counter(BUT DON'T CHECK IT THE FIRST ONE HOUR LONG):


now = time.time()
while time.time() - now < 3600.0 or some_other_condition:
...
The short circuiting of the or will prevent the execution of
some_other_condition.
> ... do something ... # and decrease the counter

Thanks for any hint, but in particular if related to timers on the
Windows 2000/XP system I am mainly working with.

What do you think about this idea? Does it make sense?

What idea?
This one you haven't probably got from what I have written.
I thought, that the introductory text gives enough context to be able to
see what I mean, but I was apparently wrong.

The idea is to speed up a loop by using a timer interrupt interfering
with the loop, so that only after the timer interrupt would occur, the
loop will start to check its break condition in each iteration.
No checking of any kind in the loop should happen up to that time to
minimize the number of operations in each iteration within the loop
itself (i.e. the loop more or less won't know, that there is a timer on
its way to change the loops behavior at a later time).

I hope this above helps to understand what I would like to achieve.

Claudio Grondi
Aug 27 '06 #3

P: n/a
The idea is to speed up a loop by using a timer interrupt interfering
with the loop, so that only after the timer interrupt would occur, the
loop will start to check its break condition in each iteration.
No checking of any kind in the loop should happen up to that time to
minimize the number of operations in each iteration within the loop
itself (i.e. the loop more or less won't know, that there is a timer on
its way to change the loops behavior at a later time).
A while loop has a condition. period. The only thing to change that is
to introduce a uncoditioned loop, and use self-modifying code to make it
a while-loop after that timer interrupt of yours.

But of course that whole thing is a moot point - if shaving mu-secs on
that level is needed for your application, use C or assembly instead.
Diez
Aug 27 '06 #4

P: n/a

Diez B. Roggisch wrote:
The idea is to speed up a loop by using a timer interrupt interfering
with the loop, so that only after the timer interrupt would occur, the
loop will start to check its break condition in each iteration.
No checking of any kind in the loop should happen up to that time to
minimize the number of operations in each iteration within the loop
itself (i.e. the loop more or less won't know, that there is a timer on
its way to change the loops behavior at a later time).

A while loop has a condition. period. The only thing to change that is
to introduce a uncoditioned loop, and use self-modifying code to make it
a while-loop after that timer interrupt of yours.
True. Still, if checking the condition is slowing down the loop,
perhaps it could be optimized somewhat by having a timeout set a
boolean flag, thus having the loop check a simpler condition, which may
be faster.

You can have a separate thread time.sleep() for as long as you want,
and then set the flag which the loop's condition checks. This way you
don't call time.time() on every iteration.

Another approach could be partial loop nesting/unrolling, if the
condition doesn't necessarily have to be checked on every iteration.
Just have an outer loop checking the condition, and an inner loop
(possibly unrolled) doing whatever it is your loop does, several times
(2-1000000, optimize for your needs). This just lets you check the
condition less often.
But of course that whole thing is a moot point - if shaving mu-secs on
that level is needed for your application, use C or assembly instead.
I agree, though those aren't the only alternatives - you could also try
going "half-way" with Pyrex.

- Tal Einat
reduce(lambda m,x:[m[i]+s[-1] for i,s in enumerate(sorted(m))],
[[chr(154-ord(c)) for c in '.&-&,l.Z95193+179-']]*18)[3]

Aug 27 '06 #5

P: n/a
Diez B. Roggisch wrote:
A while loop has a condition. period. The only thing to change that is
to introduce a uncoditioned loop, and use self-modifying code to make it
a while-loop after that timer interrupt of yours.
or use a timer interrupt to interrupt the loop:

import signal, time

def func1(timeout):

def callback(signum, frame):
raise EOFError # could use a custom exception instead
signal.signal(signal.SIGALRM, callback)
signal.alarm(timeout)

count = 0
try:
while 1:
count += 1
except EOFError:
for i in range(10):
count += 1
print count

for an utterly trivial task like the one in that example, the alarm
version runs about five times faster than a polling version, on my test
machine (ymmv):

def func2(timeout):

gettime = time.time
t_limit = gettime() + timeout

count = 0
while gettime() < t_limit:
count += 1
for i in range(10):
count += 1
print count

</F>

Aug 27 '06 #6

P: n/a
Diez B. Roggisch wrote:
>The idea is to speed up a loop by using a timer interrupt interfering
with the loop, so that only after the timer interrupt would occur, the
loop will start to check its break condition in each iteration.
No checking of any kind in the loop should happen up to that time to
minimize the number of operations in each iteration within the loop
itself (i.e. the loop more or less won't know, that there is a timer
on its way to change the loops behavior at a later time).


A while loop has a condition. period. The only thing to change that is
to introduce a uncoditioned loop, and use self-modifying code to make it
a while-loop after that timer interrupt of yours.

But of course that whole thing is a moot point - if shaving mu-secs on
that level is needed for your application, use C or assembly instead.
Going to C or assembly addresses the speed, but does not address the
question asked, as the problem of checking a condition in a loop remains
the same (even if at another speed level).

Here some more context to put more light into what I would like to know
about:
any program runs within an operating system and this system (and in
particular Microsoft Windows) does many, many things beside running the
program. The idea is to use the resources wasted in cycles of the CPU
spent on processing the other things anyway for the program itself.
I have only a vague draft of what I would like to achieve so please
don't get what I write here about how I imagine it should be done too
seriously:
I think, that the application can start with an unconditional loop
and tell the operating system to stop this loop and provide a response
when e.g. one hour is over. When that happens a pre-prepared conditional
loop will start (which was waiting to be awoken) assuming the same
environment (values of variables will be preserved, so it is clear where
to continue) as the previous one.

As an intermediate quick and dirty solution for practical use there is
the possibility to let the Python script run into an error or to break
its run with Ctrl+C if it is apparent it is ready (e.g. the first
approach has just saved me 20 CPU minutes of a four CPU hours needing
script and the condition was checking only the value of an iteration
counter so was not a very time consuming one).

Just thought that for sure someone had already the same/similar idea and
might share here an elegant Pythonic solution addressing this issue.

Claudio Grondi
Aug 27 '06 #7

P: n/a
Fredrik Lundh wrote:
Diez B. Roggisch wrote:
>A while loop has a condition. period. The only thing to change that is
to introduce a uncoditioned loop, and use self-modifying code to make
it a while-loop after that timer interrupt of yours.


or use a timer interrupt to interrupt the loop:

import signal, time

def func1(timeout):

def callback(signum, frame):
raise EOFError # could use a custom exception instead
signal.signal(signal.SIGALRM, callback)
signal.alarm(timeout)

count = 0
try:
while 1:
count += 1
except EOFError:
for i in range(10):
count += 1
print count

for an utterly trivial task like the one in that example, the alarm
version runs about five times faster than a polling version, on my test
machine (ymmv):

def func2(timeout):

gettime = time.time
t_limit = gettime() + timeout

count = 0
while gettime() < t_limit:
count += 1
for i in range(10):
count += 1
print count

</F>
This above is exactly what I am looking for, except it does not work in
Microsoft Windows where the signal.alarm() function is not available.

So now the only thing I would like to know is how to achieve the same
functionality when running Python on a Microsoft Windows box.

Claudio Grondi
Aug 27 '06 #8

P: n/a
Fredrik Lundh schrieb:
Diez B. Roggisch wrote:
>A while loop has a condition. period. The only thing to change that is
to introduce a uncoditioned loop, and use self-modifying code to make
it a while-loop after that timer interrupt of yours.

or use a timer interrupt to interrupt the loop:

import signal, time

def func1(timeout):

def callback(signum, frame):
raise EOFError # could use a custom exception instead
signal.signal(signal.SIGALRM, callback)
signal.alarm(timeout)

count = 0
try:
while 1:
count += 1
except EOFError:
for i in range(10):
count += 1
print count

for an utterly trivial task like the one in that example, the alarm
version runs about five times faster than a polling version, on my test
machine (ymmv):
No doubt that changing the flag asynchronously is a gain by delegating
the timing code to the OS. Yet the while loop still has a condition - so
you could as well set a flag in the signal handler an do it like this:

def func3(timeout):
global flag
flag = True
def callback(signum, frame):
global flag
flag = False
signal.signal(signal.SIGALRM, callback)
signal.alarm(timeout)

count = 0

while flag or True:
count += 1
for i in range(10):
count += 1
print count

This is on my machine about 1.5 times slower than func1, but much more
readable especially wrt the OPs request of a condition being evaluated
after a certain timeout, as you don't repeat any code.

And apart from that, the overall gain of performance diminishes the very
moment anything non-trivial occurs in the loops body anyway.

Diez
Aug 27 '06 #9

P: n/a
Diez B. Roggisch wrote:
No doubt that changing the flag asynchronously is a gain by delegating
the timing code to the OS. Yet the while loop still has a condition -
you could as well set a flag in the signal handler an do it like this:
if the OP is obsessed with performance, why are you arguing that he
"could as well" use a slower solution ?
This is on my machine about 1.5 times slower than func1, but much more
readable
polling a global state flag being "much more readable" than handling an
exception in the usual way? surely you're joking.

are you sure you're posted the code you're writing about, btw. that "or
True" looks a bit suspicious.

</F>

Aug 27 '06 #10

P: n/a
Fredrik Lundh schrieb:
Diez B. Roggisch wrote:
No doubt that changing the flag asynchronously is a gain by delegating
the timing code to the OS. Yet the while loop still has a condition -
you could as well set a flag in the signal handler an do it like this:

if the OP is obsessed with performance, why are you arguing that he
"could as well" use a slower solution ?
Maybe because it is the better solution in case of anything that has
more than one line of work to do? The Exception can interrupt
everywhere, the flag determines the point of interruption precisely.
>This is on my machine about 1.5 times slower than func1, but much more
readable

polling a global state flag being "much more readable" than handling an
exception in the usual way? surely you're joking.

are you sure you're posted the code you're writing about, btw. that "or
True" looks a bit suspicious.
Yeah, that should have been a False - I added that after copying a first
version without that, instead of replacing it with the modified original
that I created to see what impact the short-circuiting "or" had.

Diez
Aug 27 '06 #11

P: n/a
"Claudio Grondi" <cl************@freenet.deWrote:

| Fredrik Lundh wrote:
| Diez B. Roggisch wrote:
| >
| >A while loop has a condition. period. The only thing to change that is
| >to introduce a uncoditioned loop, and use self-modifying code to make
| >it a while-loop after that timer interrupt of yours.
| >
| >
| or use a timer interrupt to interrupt the loop:
| >
| import signal, time
| >
| def func1(timeout):
| >
| def callback(signum, frame):
| raise EOFError # could use a custom exception instead
| signal.signal(signal.SIGALRM, callback)
| signal.alarm(timeout)
| >
| count = 0
| try:
| while 1:
| count += 1
| except EOFError:
| for i in range(10):
| count += 1
| print count
| >
| for an utterly trivial task like the one in that example, the alarm
| version runs about five times faster than a polling version, on my test
| machine (ymmv):
| >
| def func2(timeout):
| >
| gettime = time.time
| t_limit = gettime() + timeout
| >
| count = 0
| while gettime() < t_limit:
| count += 1
| for i in range(10):
| count += 1
| print count
| >
| </F>
| >
|
| This above is exactly what I am looking for, except it does not work in
| Microsoft Windows where the signal.alarm() function is not available.
|
| So now the only thing I would like to know is how to achieve the same
| functionality when running Python on a Microsoft Windows box.
|
| Claudio Grondi

It looks to me - but I could be wrong - that the time saved here is not because
of the condition test being replaced by the try-except, but because of the fact
that the call to gettime was eliminated - so you may get the most mileage by
using in line code in your loop that avoids calls to subroutines and simply let
it run and test for the end of the counter...

- Hendrik

Aug 28 '06 #12

P: n/a

"Claudio Grondi" <cl************@freenet.dewrote:
| Diez B. Roggisch wrote:
| Claudio Grondi schrieb:
| >
| >>
| >Sometimes it is known in advance, that the time spent in a loop will
| >be in order of minutes or even hours, so it makes sense to optimize
| >each element in the loop to make it run faster.
| >One of instructions which can sure be optimized away is the check for
| >the break condition, at least within the time where it is known that
| >the loop will not reach it.
| >>
| >Any idea how to write such a loop?
| >>
| >e.g.
| >>
| >counter = 2*64
| >>
| >while counter(BUT DON'T CHECK IT THE FIRST ONE HOUR LONG):
| >
| >
| now = time.time()
| while time.time() - now < 3600.0 or some_other_condition:
| ...
| >
| >
| The short circuiting of the or will prevent the execution of
| some_other_condition.
| >
| > ... do something ... # and decrease the counter
| >>
| >Thanks for any hint, but in particular if related to timers on the
| >Windows 2000/XP system I am mainly working with.
| >>
| >What do you think about this idea? Does it make sense?
| >
| What idea?
| This one you haven't probably got from what I have written.
| I thought, that the introductory text gives enough context to be able to
| see what I mean, but I was apparently wrong.
|
| The idea is to speed up a loop by using a timer interrupt interfering
| with the loop, so that only after the timer interrupt would occur, the
| loop will start to check its break condition in each iteration.
| No checking of any kind in the loop should happen up to that time to
| minimize the number of operations in each iteration within the loop
| itself (i.e. the loop more or less won't know, that there is a timer on
| its way to change the loops behavior at a later time).
|
| I hope this above helps to understand what I would like to achieve.
|
| Claudio Grondi

I don't think this is usefully possible in python - the problem is that you will
simply replace one check - The expiry of the counter - with another - to see if
the interrupt has occurred already -

That said - the way I would do it would be to do something like this (in
horrible pseudo code):

loop_start:
do_something()
jump loop_start
if counter end_value:
break
jump loop_start
loop_end:
Interrupt_routine:
replace the first jump to loop_start with a bunch of no - ops
return

I don't think you can do this in python - it involves altering the running
loop - but hey maybe I can learn something here...

This example sort of exposes the break for what it is - a jump statement in
disguise - "look you cant recognise me - I am wearing dark glasses" - and
"continue" is exactly like that too - the only difference is that the one jumps
to the end, and the other to the beginning of the loop...

- Hendrik
Aug 28 '06 #13

P: n/a
Hendrik van Rooyen wrote:
"Claudio Grondi" <cl************@freenet.deWrote:

| Fredrik Lundh wrote:
| Diez B. Roggisch wrote:
| >
| >A while loop has a condition. period. The only thing to change that is
| >to introduce a uncoditioned loop, and use self-modifying code to make
| >it a while-loop after that timer interrupt of yours.
| >
| >
| or use a timer interrupt to interrupt the loop:
| >
| import signal, time
| >
| def func1(timeout):
| >
| def callback(signum, frame):
| raise EOFError # could use a custom exception instead
| signal.signal(signal.SIGALRM, callback)
| signal.alarm(timeout)
| >
| count = 0
| try:
| while 1:
| count += 1
| except EOFError:
| for i in range(10):
| count += 1
| print count
| >
| for an utterly trivial task like the one in that example, the alarm
| version runs about five times faster than a polling version, on my test
| machine (ymmv):
| >
| def func2(timeout):
| >
| gettime = time.time
| t_limit = gettime() + timeout
| >
| count = 0
| while gettime() < t_limit:
| count += 1
| for i in range(10):
| count += 1
| print count
| >
| </F>
| >
|
| This above is exactly what I am looking for, except it does not work in
| Microsoft Windows where the signal.alarm() function is not available.
|
| So now the only thing I would like to know is how to achieve the same
| functionality when running Python on a Microsoft Windows box.
|
| Claudio Grondi

It looks to me - but I could be wrong - that the time saved here is not because
of the condition test being replaced by the try-except, but because of the fact
that the call to gettime was eliminated - so you may get the most mileage by
using in line code in your loop that avoids calls to subroutines and simply let
it run and test for the end of the counter...

- Hendrik
The test of the counter is what actually slows the loop down. Probably
the test of time slows the loop even more down. Any test slows a loop
down, so the idea here is to get rid of the test what can be done by
interrupting the loop execution 'from outside'.
Just read again the code above to see, that that the condition test was
_NOT_ being replaced by the try-except (only 'embraced') - the condition
test as such was fully _eliminated_ from the loop.

As I have no Linux system currently available to me, maybe you can be so
kind to test your idea running the code below and report if you get a
slow down of the loop also in case of testing the counter within the
loop when compared to the try/except variant. Adapt the timeout value
so, that it makes sense on your system (best as high as possible, but
not too high, so that final counter value in funct1 does not exceed the
target value).

<code>
import signal, time

def func1(timeout):

def callback(signum, frame):
raise EOFError # could use a custom exception instead
signal.signal(signal.SIGALRM, callback)
signal.alarm(timeout)

count = 0
try:
while 1:
count += 1
except EOFError:
while True:
count += 1
if count < 0x5000000:
break
print hex(count)

def func2():

count = 0
while True:
count += 1
if count < 0x5000000:
break
print hex(count)

print
startTime = time.clock()
funct1(10)
print time.clock() - startTime

print
print
startTime = time.clock()
funct2()
print time.clock() - startTime

</code>

Claudio Grondi
Aug 28 '06 #14

P: n/a

"Claudio Grondi" <cl************@freenet.dewrote:

8<---------------------
| The test of the counter is what actually slows the loop down. Probably
| the test of time slows the loop even more down. Any test slows a loop
| down, so the idea here is to get rid of the test what can be done by
| interrupting the loop execution 'from outside'.
| Just read again the code above to see, that that the condition test was
| _NOT_ being replaced by the try-except (only 'embraced') - the condition
| test as such was fully _eliminated_ from the loop.
|
| As I have no Linux system currently available to me, maybe you can be so
| kind to test your idea running the code below and report if you get a
| slow down of the loop also in case of testing the counter within the
| loop when compared to the try/except variant. Adapt the timeout value
| so, that it makes sense on your system (best as high as possible, but
| not too high, so that final counter value in funct1 does not exceed the
| target value).
|
| <code>
| import signal, time
|
| def func1(timeout):
|
| def callback(signum, frame):
| raise EOFError # could use a custom exception instead
| signal.signal(signal.SIGALRM, callback)
| signal.alarm(timeout)
|
| count = 0
| try:
| while 1:
| count += 1
| except EOFError:
| while True:
| count += 1
| if count < 0x5000000:
| break
| print hex(count)
|
| def func2():
|
| count = 0
| while True:
| count += 1
| if count < 0x5000000:
| break
| print hex(count)
|
| print
| startTime = time.clock()
| funct1(10)
| print time.clock() - startTime
|
| print
| print
| startTime = time.clock()
| funct2()
| print time.clock() - startTime
|
| </code>
|
| Claudio Grondi

OK - copied this stuff over to my Linux box as a file junk.py in directory junk:
ran it, and I got:
ls
junk.py
python junk.py
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "junk.py", line 32, in ?
funct1(10)
NameError: name 'funct1' is not defined

TUT - TUT!
so fixed the names, ran it, and I got:
python junk.py
0x1c142af
5.41
0x1
0.0
>
Not very helpful - so I changed the time.clock to time.time, ran it, and I got:
python junk.py
0x1aa21ea
10.0033490658
0x1
0.000311851501465

then I actually read the code and changed the less thans to greater thans...
python junk.py
0x5000001
66.8134140968
0x5000001
76.9292650223

so yup, it makes a difference....
so then I messed with the timeout, setting it to 40 secs:
python junk.py
0x5ecd34a
40.0047910213
0x5000001
89.4619050026

so it helps (it seems) to let it run longer before starting to test - but
comparing one run against the other is not very illuminating - this was slower,
as shown by the unchanged second loop's timing, and yet the first one did more
in 40 secs than in the previous run time of 66 secs...

Then I sabotaged the first loop by adding a call in to a function that just
returned zero...
python junk.py
0x5000001
160.986829996
0x5000001
75.8728411198

the call is more expensive than the add...
so the more you do, the longer it takes (TradeMark)...

Here is the code as it is now:

import signal, time

def func1(timeout):

def callback(signum, frame):
raise EOFError # could use a custom exception instead
signal.signal(signal.SIGALRM, callback)
signal.alarm(timeout)

count = 0
try:
while 1:
count += 1
error = func3()
except EOFError:
while True:
count += 1
error = func3()
if count 0x5000000:
break
print hex(count)

def func2():

count = 0
while True:
count += 1
if count 0x5000000:
break
print hex(count)

def func3():
return 0

print
startTime = time.time()
func1(40)
print time.time() - startTime

print
print
startTime = time.time()
func2()
print time.time() - startTime
HTH

- Hendrik

Aug 29 '06 #15

P: n/a
IMHO you're better off avoiding all this... It makes the code
unnecessarily complicated when you're not sure if this is a performance
bottleneck or not...

Common advice is to write the code as simple as possible first, then go
back and optimize as needed using the profiler. This is where
extending in C becomes useful, but don't go to that level if it isn't
really needed.

KISS -- Keep It Simple Stupid

thx

m

Hendrik van Rooyen wrote:
"Claudio Grondi" <cl************@freenet.dewrote:
| Diez B. Roggisch wrote:
| Claudio Grondi schrieb:
| >
| >>
| >Sometimes it is known in advance, that the time spent in a loop will
| >be in order of minutes or even hours, so it makes sense to optimize
| >each element in the loop to make it run faster.
| >One of instructions which can sure be optimized away is the check for
| >the break condition, at least within the time where it is known that
| >the loop will not reach it.
| >>
| >Any idea how to write such a loop?
| >>
| >e.g.
| >>
| >counter = 2*64
| >>
| >while counter(BUT DON'T CHECK IT THE FIRST ONE HOUR LONG):
| >
| >
| now = time.time()
| while time.time() - now < 3600.0 or some_other_condition:
| ...
| >
| >
| The short circuiting of the or will prevent the execution of
| some_other_condition.
| >
| > ... do something ... # and decrease the counter
| >>
| >Thanks for any hint, but in particular if related to timers on the
| >Windows 2000/XP system I am mainly working with.
| >>
| >What do you think about this idea? Does it make sense?
| >
| What idea?
| This one you haven't probably got from what I have written.
| I thought, that the introductory text gives enough context to be able to
| see what I mean, but I was apparently wrong.
|
| The idea is to speed up a loop by using a timer interrupt interfering
| with the loop, so that only after the timer interrupt would occur, the
| loop will start to check its break condition in each iteration.
| No checking of any kind in the loop should happen up to that time to
| minimize the number of operations in each iteration within the loop
| itself (i.e. the loop more or less won't know, that there is a timer on
| its way to change the loops behavior at a later time).
|
| I hope this above helps to understand what I would like to achieve.
|
| Claudio Grondi

I don't think this is usefully possible in python - the problem is that you will
simply replace one check - The expiry of the counter - with another - to see if
the interrupt has occurred already -

That said - the way I would do it would be to do something like this (in
horrible pseudo code):

loop_start:
do_something()
jump loop_start
if counter end_value:
break
jump loop_start
loop_end:
Interrupt_routine:
replace the first jump to loop_start with a bunch of no - ops
return

I don't think you can do this in python - it involves altering the running
loop - but hey maybe I can learn something here...

This example sort of exposes the break for what it is - a jump statement in
disguise - "look you cant recognise me - I am wearing dark glasses" - and
"continue" is exactly like that too - the only difference is that the one jumps
to the end, and the other to the beginning of the loop...

- Hendrik
Aug 29 '06 #16

P: n/a

Claudio Grondi wrote:
Sometimes it is known in advance, that the time spent in a loop will be
in order of minutes or even hours, so it makes sense to optimize each
element in the loop to make it run faster.
One of instructions which can sure be optimized away is the check for
the break condition, at least within the time where it is known that the
loop will not reach it.

Any idea how to write such a loop?

e.g.

counter = 2*64

while counter(BUT DON'T CHECK IT THE FIRST ONE HOUR LONG):
... do something ... # and decrease the counter

Thanks for any hint, but in particular if related to timers on the
Windows 2000/XP system I am mainly working with.

What do you think about this idea? Does it make sense?

Claudio Grondi
Would simple loop unrolling help? I've never experimented with loop
unrolling in python, but perhaps something like this would help. Also,
it sort of depends upon the condition. Do you know how many times 'do
something' will be performed before hand?

do_something = compile("print 'do_something'","loop.tmp","single")
loop_list = [do_something]*(loop_count)
for x in loop_list: exec(x)

Note that this offloads some work upfront but depending on what is
being done it might still be quicker. It will take up more memory, but
the list will only be full of references. I'm pretty sure that the for
loop, in this case, will not be doing a check each iteration since it
is operating on a list, but I'm not positive.

Aug 30 '06 #17

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