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How to get the ascii code of Chinese characters?

P: n/a
Hi,everyone:

Have you any ideas?

Say whatever you know about this.
thanks.

Aug 19 '06 #1
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19 Replies


P: n/a
many_years_after wrote:
Hi,everyone:

Have you any ideas?

Say whatever you know about this.
thanks.
Hi,

You mean unicode I assume:
http://www.rikai.com/library/kanjita....unicode.shtml

Regards,

Philippe

Aug 19 '06 #2

P: n/a
many_years_after wrote:
Hi,everyone:

Have you any ideas?

Say whatever you know about this.
Perhaps you had better explain what you mean by "ascii code of Chinese
characters". Chinese characters ("hanzi") can be represented in many
ways on a computer, in Unicode as well as many different "legacy"
encodings, such as GB, GBK, big5, two different 4-digit telegraph
codes, etc etc. They can also be spelled out in "roman" letters with or
without tone indications (digits or "accents") in the pinyin system --
is that what you mean by "ascii code"?

Perhaps you might like to tell us what you want to do in Python with
hanzi and "ascii codes", so that we can give you a specific answer.
With examples, please -- like what are the "ascii codes" for the two
characters in the common greeting that comes across in toneless pinyin
as "ni hao"?

Cheers,
John

Aug 19 '06 #3

P: n/a
Philippe Martin wrote:
many_years_after wrote:
>Hi,everyone:

Have you any ideas?

Say whatever you know about this.
thanks.
Hi,

You mean unicode I assume:
http://www.rikai.com/library/kanjita....unicode.shtml

Regards,

Philippe
Hi,

I have received a personnal email on this:

Kanji is indeed a Japanese subset of the Chinese Character set.

I just thought it would be relevant as it includes ~47000 characters.

If I hurt any feeling, sorry.

Regards,

Philippe

Aug 19 '06 #4

P: n/a
hi:

what I want to do is just to make numbers as people input some Chinese
character(hanzi,i mean).The same character will create the same
number.So I think ascii code can do this very well.

John Machin wrote:
many_years_after wrote:
Hi,everyone:

Have you any ideas?

Say whatever you know about this.

Perhaps you had better explain what you mean by "ascii code of Chinese
characters". Chinese characters ("hanzi") can be represented in many
ways on a computer, in Unicode as well as many different "legacy"
encodings, such as GB, GBK, big5, two different 4-digit telegraph
codes, etc etc. They can also be spelled out in "roman" letters with or
without tone indications (digits or "accents") in the pinyin system --
is that what you mean by "ascii code"?

Perhaps you might like to tell us what you want to do in Python with
hanzi and "ascii codes", so that we can give you a specific answer.
With examples, please -- like what are the "ascii codes" for the two
characters in the common greeting that comes across in toneless pinyin
as "ni hao"?

Cheers,
John
Aug 19 '06 #5

P: n/a
In <11**********************@i42g2000cwa.googlegroups .com>,
many_years_after wrote:
what I want to do is just to make numbers as people input some Chinese
character(hanzi,i mean).The same character will create the same
number.So I think ascii code can do this very well.
No it can't. ASCII doesn't contain Chinese characters.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ASCII

Ciao,
Marc 'BlackJack' Rintsch
Aug 19 '06 #6

P: n/a
* many_years_after (2006-08-19 12:18 +0100)
Hi,everyone:

Have you any ideas?

Say whatever you know about this.
contradictio in adiecto
Aug 19 '06 #7

P: n/a
On 2006-08-19 12:42:31, Marc 'BlackJack' Rintsch wrote:
many_years_after wrote:
>what I want to do is just to make numbers as people input some Chinese
character(hanzi,i mean).The same character will create the same
number.So I think ascii code can do this very well.

No it can't. ASCII doesn't contain Chinese characters.
Well, ASCII can represent the Unicode numerically -- if that is what the OP
wants. For example, "U+81EC" (all ASCII) is one possible -- not very
readable though <g-- representation of a Hanzi character (see
http://www.cojak.org/index.php?funct...kup&term=81EC).

(I don't know anything about Hanzi or Mandarin... But that's Unicode, so
this works :)

Gerhard

Aug 19 '06 #8

P: n/a
Gerhard Fiedler wrote:
Well, ASCII can represent the Unicode numerically -- if that is what the OP
wants.
No. ASCII characters range is 0..127 while Unicode characters range is
at least 0..65535.
For example, "U+81EC" (all ASCII) is one possible -- not very
readable though <g-- representation of a Hanzi character (see
http://www.cojak.org/index.php?funct...kup&term=81EC).
U+81EC means a Unicode character which is represented by the number
0x81EC. There are some encodings defined which map Unicode sequences
to byte sequences: UTF-8 maps Unicode strings to sequences of bytes in
the range 0..255, UTF-7 maps Unicode strings to sequences of bytes in
the range 0..127. You *could* read the latter as ASCII sequences
but this is not correct.

How to do it in Python? Let chinesePhrase be a Unicode string with
Chinese content. Then

chinesePhrase_7bit = chinesePhrase.encode('utf-7')

will produce a sequences of bytes in the range 0..127 representing
chinesePhrase and *looking like* a (meaningless) ASCII sequence.

chinesePhrase_16bit = chinesePhrase.encode('utf-16be')

will produce a sequence with Unicode numbers packed in a byte
string in big endian order. This is probably closest to what
the OP wants.

Peter Maas, Aachen
Aug 19 '06 #9

P: n/a

many_years_after wrote:
John Machin wrote:
many_years_after wrote:
Hi,everyone:
>
Have you any ideas?
>
Say whatever you know about this.
>
Perhaps you had better explain what you mean by "ascii code of Chinese
characters". Chinese characters ("hanzi") can be represented in many
ways on a computer, in Unicode as well as many different "legacy"
encodings, such as GB, GBK, big5, two different 4-digit telegraph
codes, etc etc. They can also be spelled out in "roman" letters with or
without tone indications (digits or "accents") in the pinyin system --
is that what you mean by "ascii code"?

Perhaps you might like to tell us what you want to do in Python with
hanzi and "ascii codes", so that we can give you a specific answer.
With examples, please -- like what are the "ascii codes" for the two
characters in the common greeting that comes across in toneless pinyin
as "ni hao"?

Cheers,
John
hi:

what I want to do is just to make numbers as people input some Chinese
character(hanzi,i mean).The same character will create the same
number.So I think ascii code can do this very well.
*What* characters make *what* numbers? Stop thinking and give us some
*examples*

Aug 19 '06 #10

P: n/a
On 2006-08-19 16:54:36, Peter Maas wrote:
Gerhard Fiedler wrote:
>Well, ASCII can represent the Unicode numerically -- if that is what the OP
wants.

No. ASCII characters range is 0..127 while Unicode characters range is
at least 0..65535.
Actually, Unicode goes beyond 65535. But right in this sentence, you
represented the number 65535 with ASCII characters, so it doesn't seem to
be impossible.
>For example, "U+81EC" (all ASCII) is one possible -- not very
readable though <g-- representation of a Hanzi character (see
http://www.cojak.org/index.php?funct...kup&term=81EC).

U+81EC means a Unicode character which is represented by the number
0x81EC.
Exactly. Both versions represented in ASCII right in your message :)
UTF-8 maps Unicode strings to sequences of bytes in the range 0..255,
UTF-7 maps Unicode strings to sequences of bytes in the range 0..127.
You *could* read the latter as ASCII sequences but this is not correct.
Of course not "correct". I guess the only "correct" representation is the
original Chinese character. But the OP doesn't seem to want this... so a
non-"correct" representation is necessary anyway.
How to do it in Python? Let chinesePhrase be a Unicode string with
Chinese content. Then

chinesePhrase_7bit = chinesePhrase.encode('utf-7')

will produce a sequences of bytes in the range 0..127 representing
chinesePhrase and *looking like* a (meaningless) ASCII sequence.
Actually, no. There are quite a few code positions in the range 0..127 that
don't "look like" anything (non-printable). And, as you say, this is rather
meaningless.
chinesePhrase_16bit = chinesePhrase.encode('utf-16be')

will produce a sequence with Unicode numbers packed in a byte
string in big endian order. This is probably closest to what
the OP wants.
That's what you think... but it's not really ASCII. If you want this in
ASCII, and readable, I still suggest to transform this sequence of 2-byte
values (for Chinese characters it will be 2 bytes per character) into a
sequence of something like U+81EC (or 0x81EC if you are a C fan or 81EC if
you can imply the rest)... that's where we come back to my original
suggestion :)

Gerhard

Aug 19 '06 #11

P: n/a

many_years_after wrote:
hi:

what I want to do is just to make numbers as people input some Chinese
character(hanzi,i mean).The same character will create the same
number.So I think ascii code can do this very well.
Possibly you have "create" upside-down. Could you possibly be talking
about an "input method", in which people type in ascii letters (and
maybe numbers) and the *result* is a Chinese character? In other words,
what *everybody* uses to input Chinese characters?

Perhaps you could ask on the Chinese Python newsgroup.

*GIVE* *EXAMPLES* of what you want to do.

Aug 19 '06 #12

P: n/a

John Machin wrote:
many_years_after wrote:
hi:

what I want to do is just to make numbers as people input some Chinese
character(hanzi,i mean).The same character will create the same
number.So I think ascii code can do this very well.

Possibly you have "create" upside-down. Could you possibly be talking
about an "input method", in which people type in ascii letters (and
maybe numbers) and the *result* is a Chinese character? In other words,
what *everybody* uses to input Chinese characters?

Perhaps you could ask on the Chinese Python newsgroup.

*GIVE* *EXAMPLES* of what you want to do.
Well, people may input from keyboard. They input some Chinese
characters, then, I want to create a number. The same number will be
created if they input the same Chinese characters.

Aug 20 '06 #13

P: n/a
"many_years_after" <sh*****@gmail.comwrites:
Well, people may input from keyboard. They input some Chinese
characters, then, I want to create a number. The same number will be
created if they input the same Chinese characters.
You seem to be looking for a hash.

<URL:http://docs.python.org/lib/module-md5>
<URL:http://docs.python.org/lib/module-sha>

If not, please tell us what your *purpose* is. It's not at all clear
from your questions what you are trying to achieve.

--
\ "I was in a bar the other night, hopping from barstool to |
`\ barstool, trying to get lucky, but there wasn't any gum under |
_o__) any of them." -- Emo Philips |
Ben Finney

Aug 20 '06 #14

P: n/a
Gerhard Fiedler wrote:
>No. ASCII characters range is 0..127 while Unicode characters range is
at least 0..65535.

Actually, Unicode goes beyond 65535.
you may want to look up "at least" in a dictionary.

</F>

Aug 20 '06 #15

P: n/a
many_years_after wrote:
Well, people may input from keyboard. They input some Chinese
characters, then, I want to create a number. The same number will be
created if they input the same Chinese characters.
assuming you mean "code point" rather than "ASCII code" (ASCII is a
specific encoding that *doesn't* include Chinese characters), "ord" is
what you want:

char = read_from_some_input_device()
code = ord(char)

see:

http://pyref.infogami.com/ord

</F>

Aug 20 '06 #16

P: n/a
In message <ma***************************************@python. org>, Fredrik
Lundh wrote:
Gerhard Fiedler wrote:
>>No. ASCII characters range is 0..127 while Unicode characters range is
at least 0..65535.

Actually, Unicode goes beyond 65535.

you may want to look up "at least" in a dictionary.
Maybe you need to do the same for "actually".
Aug 20 '06 #17

P: n/a
On 2006-08-20 05:56:05, Fredrik Lundh wrote:
>>No. ASCII characters range is 0..127 while Unicode characters range is
at least 0..65535.

Actually, Unicode goes beyond 65535.

you may want to look up "at least" in a dictionary.
As a homework, try to parse "at least until" and "goes beyond" and compare
the two (a dictionary is not necessarily of help with this :)

"range is least 0..65535" : upper_bound >= 65535
"goes beyond 65535" : upper_bound 65535

For some discussions (like how to represent code points etc) this
distinction is crucial.

Gerhard

Aug 20 '06 #18

P: n/a
Gerhard Fiedler wrote:
>>Actually, Unicode goes beyond 65535.

you may want to look up "at least" in a dictionary.

As a homework, try to parse "at least until" and "goes beyond" and compare
the two (a dictionary is not necessarily of help with this :)

"range is least 0..65535" : upper_bound >= 65535
"goes beyond 65535" : upper_bound 65535

For some discussions (like how to represent code points etc) this
distinction is crucial.
do you know anything about how Unicode is used in real life, or are you
just squabbling ?

</F>

Aug 20 '06 #19

P: n/a
On 2006-08-20 10:31:20, Fredrik Lundh wrote:
>"range is least 0..65535" : upper_bound >= 65535
"goes beyond 65535" : upper_bound 65535

For some discussions (like how to represent code points etc) this
distinction is crucial.

do you know anything about how Unicode is used in real life, or are you
just squabbling ?
Your point is?

Gerhard

Aug 20 '06 #20

This discussion thread is closed

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