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Installation of python on my workspace.

P: n/a
Hi,

I had two questions. I am new to Unix and Python. I wanted to get
python installed on my unix terminal without too much interference from
the administrator. How can I do this?

It seems python is already installed at some location. But when i type
Idle I am not able to get the Integrated Environment(IDLE). There is
already the Tkinter.py installed . Do i have to modify my profile and
add any environment variables to my .profile to get it going.

I would greatly appreciate it, if anyone could help me with this.
Thanks.

Jul 6 '06 #1
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2 Replies


P: n/a

py****@gmail.com wrote:
Hi,

I had two questions. I am new to Unix and Python. I wanted to get
python installed on my unix terminal without too much interference from
the administrator. How can I do this?

It seems python is already installed at some location. But when i type
Idle I am not able to get the Integrated Environment(IDLE). There is
already the Tkinter.py installed . Do i have to modify my profile and
add any environment variables to my .profile to get it going.

I would greatly appreciate it, if anyone could help me with this.
Thanks.
As far as I know, my linux instalation of python doesn't have an IDE,
but it could be different for your situation. If it is, the command is
probably not called "idle" (that does something else normaly).

You can always use an existing text editor. If python itself is
installed, you should be able to type "python" to bring up the
interperiter, or "python filename.py" to run filename.py.

Jul 6 '06 #2

P: n/a
py****@gmail.com wrote:
I had two questions. I am new to Unix and Python. I wanted to get
python installed on my unix terminal without too much interference from
the administrator. How can I do this?
If you have the Python sources, you can configure it to install where
you tell it using the
--prefix option. E.g. ./configure --prefix=$(HOME) will install it in
your login dir, so you'd run python using $(HOME)/bin/python. No
sysadmin required.

Glenn

Jul 6 '06 #3

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