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what are you using python language for?

im just asking out of curiosity.


Jun 6 '06 #1
27 1782
At the moment, I'm using it for

1) Enginerring/scientific data analysis and visualization.

2) Serial communication test programs.

3) Small utilities for embedded software development
(processing map and hex files).

4) Miscellaneous other stuff like grabbing all of the comic
strips I like every day and putting them on a local web
page so I can read them all in one place, deleting all of
the virus-laden e-mails that Postini catches, etc.

--
Grant Edwards grante Yow! Is this BOISE??
at
visi.com
Jun 6 '06 #2
hacker1017 wrote:
im just asking out of curiosity.


To get an impression you might have a look at the Europython 2006
schedule:

http://indico.cern.ch/conferenceTimeTable.py?confId=44

Personally I'm playing with the language itself at the moment and
extend it through it:

http://www.fiber-space.de/EasyExtend/doc/EE.html

Regards,
Kay

Jun 6 '06 #3
> 4) Miscellaneous other stuff like grabbing all of the comic
strips I like every day and putting them on a local web
page so I can read them all in one place


I wonder how many other folks have done this too. It was my
first pet Python project, converting a Java rendition of the same
app into Python. Shorter, clearer, faster, better...

Mine uses my older Java config file (which, while tinkering with
Java's XML libraries, ended up being XML), supports
Referrer/Referer spoofing, searches pages for regexps so that I
can find image URLs that have been munged with random numbers
(like dilbert.com does). It then builds a local HTML file that
points at all the locally-saved images.

I wonder what other sorts of features folks have added in their
comic-snatchers...

I tried a multi-threaded version in Java, but had problems with
it saturating my dialup connection, and returning some sort of
errors (perhaps in violation of HTTP's suggestion that one only
have, IIRC, 2 connections to a server at a given time). I might
try it again with Python. I saw some function-call fly by
recently that looked like it took a function reference and an
array of parameter-arrays, and spawned a thread for each
function. I foolishly deleted that message, but it shouldn't be
too hard to scare up again. I think it involved importing
something from the future. A nice little status-GUI would be a
nice addition, but I'm too lazy to go that far, leaving it with
just a TUI. Might be a good way to learn Python GUI programming...

-tkc

Jun 6 '06 #4
On 2006-06-06, Tim Chase <py*********@tim.thechases.com> wrote:
4) Miscellaneous other stuff like grabbing all of the comic
strips I like every day and putting them on a local web
page so I can read them all in one place
I wonder how many other folks have done this too. It was my
first pet Python project, converting a Java rendition of the same
app into Python. Shorter, clearer, faster, better...

Mine uses my older Java config file (which, while tinkering with
Java's XML libraries, ended up being XML),


Mine just has lists of strip/source pairs at the top of the
source code.
supports Referrer/Referer spoofing,
Yup. Although I wouldn't actually call mine "spoofing". Since
I do grab the end URL from the referrer every time, it really
is referring me to the server where the image is.
searches pages for regexps so that I can find image URLs that
have been munged with random numbers (like dilbert.com does).
It then builds a local HTML file that points at all the
locally-saved images. I wonder what other sorts of features folks have added in their
comic-snatchers...
Mine scales the images up by 50% -- the native image size
provided by the distributors is just too small on my 19"
1280x1024 screen.
I tried a multi-threaded version in Java, but had problems
with it saturating my dialup connection, and returning some
sort of errors (perhaps in violation of HTTP's suggestion that
one only have, IIRC, 2 connections to a server at a given
time). I might try it again with Python. I saw some
function-call fly by recently that looked like it took a
function reference and an array of parameter-arrays, and
spawned a thread for each function. I foolishly deleted that
message, but it shouldn't be too hard to scare up again. I
think it involved importing something from the future. A nice
little status-GUI would be a nice addition, but I'm too lazy
to go that far, leaving it with just a TUI. Might be a good
way to learn Python GUI programming...


Mine runs as a cron job every morning before I get to the
office (which is where I read them -- don't tell anybody).

--
Grant Edwards grante Yow! Why was I BORN?
at
visi.com
Jun 6 '06 #5
hacker1017 wrote:
im just asking out of curiosity.

Err... Programming ?-)

Sorry...

Actually, mostly web applications (CMS, groupware, small/medium business
apps etc), and admin utilities.

--
bruno desthuilliers
python -c "print '@'.join(['.'.join([w[::-1] for w in p.split('.')]) for
p in 'o****@xiludom.gro'.split('@')])"
Jun 6 '06 #6

hacker1017 wrote:
im just asking out of curiosity.


Math research on the Collatz Conjecture.

Jun 6 '06 #7
i'm writing a text editor [yes, it has quite a few interesting unique
features].
<URL:http://fauxlkner.sf.net>
this summer, i hope to make it collaborative like gobby.

i also have a full-time job this summer at my college writing a small
database system to manage student records.

hacker1017 wrote:
im just asking out of curiosity.


Jun 6 '06 #8
I am using Python to assemble a biomedical literature analysis pipeline
as part of my PhD thesis. (http://ib-dwb.sf.net/Muscorian.html)

Jun 6 '06 #9
Currently I am using Python for a CRM client application that runs on
Win32, ARM Linux, and WinCE platforms. It pushes and pulls contact data
using XMLRPC calls so that it doesn't lock the client into having to
use CDO for communicating with the Exchange Server and ADO for
communicating with the SQL Server.

hacker1017 wrote:
im just asking out of curiosity.


Jun 7 '06 #10
hacker1017 <ha********@yahoo.com> wrote:
im just asking out of curiosity.


At work, since about 16 months ago, mostly for maintaining and enhancing
many programs that control, monitor, and ensure the smooth working of,
many large clusters of servers (plus, all the persnickety extra little
things that keep coming up...).

At home, mostly to orchestrate my long-standing research into the
theoretical roots of the game of contract bridge (plus, the even more
numerous persnickety big and small things that come up even more often,
at least with a wife and stepson both being students at demanding Palo
Alto teaching institutions which both happen to be named Stanford;-)...
they're both decent Python programmers [my wife more than just decent...
she's the only woman member of the PSF!-)] but I'm still happy to lend a
hand when needed -- for my stepdaughter too, who lives thousands of
miles away... she's a budding artist and often uses Poser, which lets
users write Python programs to drive the positioning and rendering...).

As a freelance consultant in Europe, before I crossed an ocean and a
continent to come work for my current employer, I used Python for a huge
variety of tasks for clients, including a multi-tier enterprise-class
workflow framework cum several specialized applications (I mostly helped
out with middleware tiers and web interfaces, but the Qt-based GUI and
the DB-interfacing backend were also Python), a tivo-like DVR system's
wide variety of programs, a web-based system to farm out photo
retouching from customers to professional consultants, a system
controlling the UI of a mechanical engineering bill-of-materials system
to either GUI or Web interfaces, and so forth.
Alex
Jun 7 '06 #11
Desktop application development

Jun 7 '06 #12
scientific computing
testing systems
hobby: games. check http://mashebali.com/?Chess_2

Jun 7 '06 #13
hacker1017 wrote:
im just asking out of curiosity.


It appears to me, that the natural language is not enough to record
thoughts/observations/enlightenments for being reviewed and used with
ease after a longer time, as for this purpose it is necessary to include
in such records some sort of activity and/or interactivity and this
requires utilization of a computer and a programming language.

Usage of Python (on top of the English language I am not native speaker
of and HTML way of formatting texts) saves me the work of documenting
the very basics of the programming language add-on used on top of
natural language for above purpose as it comes with documentation of own
elements
[i.e. keywords and concepts in form of definitions like: global_stmt ::=
"global" identifier ("," identifier)*]
from the very basic parser point of view.
Python makes an intuitive way of expressing algorithms and processes
easier by having many of for this purpose useful concepts already built-in.
By the way:
Which other programming languages provide documentation also via
giving definitions of keywords and concepts? Are there e.g. similar
definitions
[i.e e.g.: global_stmt ::= "global" identifier ("," identifier)*]
available for C/C++, Java, JavaScript?

Short expressed:
I use Python (and its huge amount of available modules) mainly as an
extension on top of natural English language and HTML formatted texts
leveraging this way the (re)use of textual recordings of ideas by
turning plain ASCII texts into interactive and searchable multimedia
content.

Claudio

Jun 7 '06 #14
hacker1017 wrote:
im just asking out of curiosity.


I am curious for what kind of (new) serious programs and projects the
Python language and its offsprings like Pyrex would not be the optimal
programming language currently? (Unless you completely misbelieve in Ruby)

Device drivers, small memory mics and browser client software - areas
which (still) lack Python support ?

-robert
Jun 7 '06 #15

hacker1017 wrote:
im just asking out of curiosity.


Embedded control system

Jun 7 '06 #16
On 2006-06-07, robert <no*****@no-spam-no-spam.com> wrote:
I am curious for what kind of (new) serious programs and projects the
Python language and its offsprings like Pyrex would not be the optimal
programming language currently?


The stuff I work on for which I don't use Python:

* Device drivers (Linux and BSD).

* Embedded systems. Even at the high end of things, my
projects have only a few MB of memory -- not nearly enough
to run Python. There's really not much point in discussing
Python for the smaller projects with 16KB of ROM and 256
bytes of RAM. ;)

--
Grant Edwards grante Yow! I'm gliding over a
at NUCLEAR WASTE DUMP near
visi.com ATLANTA, Georgia!!
Jun 7 '06 #17
I'm using Python for:

* log analysis
* test tools
* data massaging
* prototyping

Jun 7 '06 #18
I've been working on an RPG character generator for consistent (yet
varied) set of role-playing systems. Nothing like a pen-and-pencil RPG
to throw in tons of special cases and strange rulesets.

Python's turned out to be very useful for this project:

1. Fast prototyping and testing. I'm not starting the GUI until after
I get all the quirks of the rule-set down first. Naturally, I've got a
python script which sets up a subset of the rules, then a series of
unit tests which operate on the partially constructed RPG.

2. Dynamic typing. The cost object for a Character Gift can vary
dramatically in behavior. Being able to dynamically re-assign the
current cost object to a different cost type is very nice. (The cost
types are pretty much similar in data, but their methods act
differently.)

3. Joyous object serialization via the pickle protocol. While I'm
using the Gnosis XML pickler, there's always the default picklers, too.

While not part of Python, the platform-agnostic ruleset should be a
bonus. If someone doesn't like my wxPython front-end, then they can go
through the trouble of re-implementing it in their favorite system, be
it .NET and IronPython or Python/TK.

Jun 7 '06 #19
hacker1017 wrote:
im just asking out of curiosity.

a vending machine controlled from the PC (peripherals connected using
I2C bus (SMBus) and the MDB coin change-giver and the bill acceptor
connected to the serial port).

Petr Jakes

Jun 7 '06 #20
I use python to grab imformations and embed it in my delphi app. I
gather what I am intereted in so I can read them faster.

And I also use python to do some othere everyday jobs, such as
periodically copying and zipping a directory into another computer to
backup the comtent.

On 7 Jun 2006 16:11:54 -0700, Petr Jakes <pe**@tpc.cz> wrote:
hacker1017 wrote:
im just asking out of curiosity.

a vending machine controlled from the PC (peripherals connected using
I2C bus (SMBus) and the MDB coin change-giver and the bill acceptor
connected to the serial port).

Petr Jakes

--
http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list

Jun 8 '06 #21
This is my main development tool.
I use it for business specific applications (with wx, cherrypy and
mysql), mail server administration (in console mode and with cherrypy),
and utilities.
Regards
jm
Jun 8 '06 #22
I use python and the pymqi module to work with IBM WebSphere MQSeries
and IBM WebSphere Message broker.

Jun 8 '06 #23
Jason wrote:
I've been working on an RPG character generator for consistent (yet
varied) set of role-playing systems. Nothing like a pen-and-pencil RPG
to throw in tons of special cases and strange rulesets.


Sounds interesting. Something I've thought about as a project, but I'm
not good enough yet! :)
Jun 8 '06 #24
Wow that's serious Old School. Reminds me of way-back-when in Data
Processing class we used VisiCalc on the old Trash-80's for spreadsheet
work. Cut a notch in those 5 1/4" floppies and voila, you doubled your
storage capacity :-)

Dennis Lee Bieber wrote:
On Thu, 08 Jun 2006 13:52:38 GMT, John Salerno
<jo******@NOSPAMgmail.com> declaimed the following in comp.lang.python:
Jason wrote:
I've been working on an RPG character generator for consistent (yet
varied) set of role-playing systems. Nothing like a pen-and-pencil RPG
to throw in tons of special cases and strange rulesets.


Sounds interesting. Something I've thought about as a project, but I'm
not good enough yet! :)


Many years ago I had the starship design tables from (first edition)
Traveller incorporated into a Multiplan spreadsheet running on a TRS-80
Model 4
--
Wulfraed Dennis Lee Bieber KD6MOG
wl*****@ix.netcom.com wu******@bestiaria.com
HTTP://wlfraed.home.netcom.com/
(Bestiaria Support Staff: we******@bestiaria.com)
HTTP://www.bestiaria.com/


Jun 8 '06 #25
To score with the chicks!

A Python script roams the nightclubs for beautiful women, finds an
appropriate woman based on my preferances, charms her with its sleek
Pythonic manners, calls for a cab and brings the lady to my recidency.

Works like a charm!

Baalbek
Jun 9 '06 #26
baalbek wrote:
To score with the chicks!

A Python script roams the nightclubs for beautiful women, finds an
appropriate woman based on my preferances, charms her with its sleek
Pythonic manners, calls for a cab and brings the lady to my recidency.

Works like a charm!


Is that OSS ?-)

--
bruno desthuilliers
python -c "print '@'.join(['.'.join([w[::-1] for w in p.split('.')]) for
p in 'o****@xiludom.gro'.split('@')])"
Jun 9 '06 #27
ma*********@gmail.com writes:
I am using Python to assemble a biomedical literature analysis pipeline
as part of my PhD thesis. (http://ib-dwb.sf.net/Muscorian.html)


What's a literature analysis pipeline?

(mental picture: fat pressurised pipe leading to big noisy wood
chipper-style machine spewing out a flapping stream of stapled A4 into
a large skip :-)

One of the first things I used the language for was to avoid using a
nasty web interface when I wanted to do lots of scientific literature
searches. Now, I use it to write nasty web interfaces ;-) Poacher
turned gamekeeper...
John
Jun 12 '06 #28

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