469,646 Members | 1,152 Online
Bytes | Developer Community
New Post

Home Posts Topics Members FAQ

Post your question to a community of 469,646 developers. It's quick & easy.

the whole 'batteries included' idea

Pardon my naivety, you would think maybe I'd understand this by now, but
I've always kind of wondered about it. I've been curious why one of the
biggest points used to promote Python is that it has "batteries
included." True, this is a great feature, but the way it's been used
seems to suggest that other languages *don't* have this benefit. And
maybe they don't, in their own way.

So my question is, what is the difference between Python's 'batteries'
(standard modules), and C#'s framework? I know nothing of Java, but I
assume it has its own rich (and confusing) set of classes as well. Is
there something different about other languages' libraries/frameworks
that makes Python's different, and worthy of being touted as 'batteries
included'?

I hope that question even makes sense! :)
Apr 20 '06 #1
3 1004
John Salerno wrote:
Pardon my naivety, you would think maybe I'd understand this by now, but
I've always kind of wondered about it. I've been curious why one of the
biggest points used to promote Python is that it has "batteries
included." True, this is a great feature, but the way it's been used
seems to suggest that other languages *don't* have this benefit. And
maybe they don't, in their own way.

So my question is, what is the difference between Python's 'batteries'
(standard modules), and C#'s framework? I know nothing of Java, but I
assume it has its own rich (and confusing) set of classes as well. Is
there something different about other languages' libraries/frameworks
that makes Python's different, and worthy of being touted as 'batteries
included'?

I hope that question even makes sense! :)


I believe Python is unique in the depth of the standard library when
compared to most languages. Most require that you purchase or get many
of the "batteries" from somewhere outside the standard distribution.
Things like FTP clients, SMTP clients, webservers, etc. aren't normally
there by default.

-Larry Bates
Apr 20 '06 #2
John Salerno napisał(a):
So my question is, what is the difference between Python's 'batteries'
(standard modules), and C#'s framework? I know nothing of Java, but I
assume it has its own rich (and confusing) set of classes as well. Is
there something different about other languages' libraries/frameworks
that makes Python's different, and worthy of being touted as 'batteries
included'?


I can speak only for Java -- its batteries are not included, you have to
download jakarta-commons plus (since Python 2.5) JDOM to get the effect
similar to Python's stdlib. Java library only seems to be complete (i.e.
when looking on included classes), but its support for common
programming tasks is just inadequate.

--
Jarek Zgoda
http://jpa.berlios.de/
Apr 20 '06 #3
John Salerno wrote:
Pardon my naivety, you would think maybe I'd understand this by now, but
I've always kind of wondered about it. I've been curious why one of the
biggest points used to promote Python is that it has "batteries
included." True, this is a great feature, but the way it's been used
seems to suggest that other languages *don't* have this benefit. And
maybe they don't, in their own way.

So my question is, what is the difference between Python's 'batteries'
(standard modules), and C#'s framework?


I can't speak for C#'s framework but Python has a lot of modules that
other languages may not, such as zip/bzip archive handling, unit
testing, database interface modules, pretty much any network protocol
you might need, both types of XML handling, etc. For many tasks, it's
complete as-is, and that's a point worth selling.

I don't think it's as good as some people make out, though. Multimedia
support is poor - OpenGL support should have gone in many, many
versions ago, and presumably one of the trillion incarnations of
libraries for fast mathematics should have gone in too in order to
enable that. PyGame could possibly have gone in too (not sure about the
license however).

--
Ben Sizer

Apr 21 '06 #4

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.

Similar topics

6 posts views Thread by D. Alvarado | last post: by
11 posts views Thread by juglesh | last post: by
reply views Thread by Quinton | last post: by
7 posts views Thread by Alex | last post: by
2 posts views Thread by Miguel Isidoro | last post: by
By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.