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py web-app-frameworks without a rdbms...

Hi folks,

Of TurboGers & Django WAF candidates, which one would be easier to use
in an environment where the data/content doesn't come an RDBMS, but
from other server-side apps... If these are not good candidates, could
you suggest appropriate ones...

TIA,
/venkat

Mar 22 '06 #1
7 1350
On 21 Mar 2006 17:06:12 -0800, ve******@yahoo.com <ve******@yahoo.com> wrote:
Hi folks,

Of TurboGers & Django WAF candidates, which one would be easier to use
in an environment where the data/content doesn't come an RDBMS, but
from other server-side apps... If these are not good candidates, could
you suggest appropriate ones...

TIA,
/venkat

If you don't want to use RDBMS, I think Karrigell is better. Many
features of Django and TurboGears relate to database.

--
I like python!
My Blog: http://www.donews.net/limodou
NewEdit Maillist: http://groups.google.com/group/NewEdit
Mar 22 '06 #2
> If you don't want to use RDBMS, I think Karrigell is better. Many
features of Django and TurboGears relate to database.


I've just begun looking at it, but I've also been impressed with Myghty.

Mar 22 '06 #3

Try web.py. Very simple and powerful web framework.

http://webpy.org
-anand

Mar 22 '06 #4
ve******@yahoo.com wrote:
Of TurboGers & Django WAF candidates, which one would be easier to use
in an environment where the data/content doesn't come an RDBMS, but
from other server-side apps...


Django is trivial to use for this (but you still want to use a DB together
with the built-in admin interface for basic configuration stuff; sqlite may
be good enough...)

I haven't used TG myself, but it's probably just as easy.

just pick a stable release of either one and get to work.

</F>

Mar 22 '06 #5
ve******@yahoo.com wrote:
Hi folks,

Of TurboGers & Django WAF candidates, which one would be easier to use
in an environment where the data/content doesn't come an RDBMS, but
from other server-side apps...
IMHO, both.
If these are not good candidates, could
you suggest appropriate ones...


Well... There are *many* web frameworks in Python, you know ?

--
bruno desthuilliers
python -c "print '@'.join(['.'.join([w[::-1] for w in p.split('.')]) for
p in 'o****@xiludom.gro'.split('@')])"
Mar 22 '06 #6
Michael Yanowitz wrote:
I am relatively new to Python and this is my first post on
this mailing list.

I am confused as to why I am getting size differences in the following
cases:
print struct.calcsize("I") 4 print struct.calcsize("H") 2 print struct.calcsize("HI") 8 print struct.calcsize("IH") 6

Why is it 8 bytes in the third case and why would it be only 6 bytes
in the last case if it is 8 in the previous?
because modern platforms tend to use an alignment equal to the size of
the item; 2-byte objects are stored at even addresses, 4-byte objects
are stored at addresses that are multiples of four, etc.

in other words, HI is stored as 2 bytes H data plus 2 bytes padding plus
four bytes I data, while IH is four bytes I data, no padding, and 2 bytes
H data.
I tried specifying big endian and little endian and they both have
the same results.
are you sure? (see below)
I suspect, there is some kind of padding involved, but it does not
seem to be done consistently or in a recognizable method.


the alignment options are described in the library reference:

http://docs.python.org/lib/module-struct.html

default is native byte order, native padding:
struct.calcsize("IH") 6 struct.calcsize("HI") 8

to specify other byte orders, use a prefix character. this also disables
padding. e.g.
struct.calcsize("!IH") 6 struct.calcsize("!HI")

6

</F>

Mar 22 '06 #7
On Wednesday 22 March 2006 02:06, ve******@yahoo.com wrote:
Hi folks,

Of TurboGers & Django WAF candidates, which one would be easier to use
in an environment where the data/content doesn't come an RDBMS, but
from other server-side apps... If these are not good candidates, could
you suggest appropriate ones...

TIA,
/venkat


Be sure to have a look at CherryPy: http://www.cherrypy.org

Michael.
Mar 26 '06 #8

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