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Thanks for PIL (and other stuff)

P: n/a
I was just reading on daily-python that PIL is 10 years old...

So I wish it and its author(s) a good day, week, month, year and more!
Really!

Jean-Marc
PS If I knew that Python had a anniversary date, I'd also write to
thanks our BDFL (and authors)! But no such luck, so I'm restaining
myself!
;-))

Jul 19 '05 #1
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P: n/a
+1

--
Michel Claveau

Jul 19 '05 #2

P: n/a
On 23 Jun 2005 19:12:03 -0700, rumours say that "jean-marc"
<jm*********@cvm.qc.ca> might have written:
So I wish it and its author(s) a good day, week, month, year and more!
Really!


That is, "So long and thanks for all the PIL."
--
TZOTZIOY, I speak England very best.
"Be strict when sending and tolerant when receiving." (from RFC1958)
I really should keep that in mind when talking with people, actually...
Jul 19 '05 #3

P: n/a
jean-marc wrote:
PS If I knew that Python had a anniversary date, I'd also write to
thanks our BDFL (and authors)! But no such luck, so I'm restaining
myself!
;-))
From the FAQ:
Here's a very brief summary of what started it all, written by Guido van Rossum:

<Snip>

During the 1989 Christmas holidays, I had a lot of time on my hand, so I decided to give it a try. During the next year, while still mostly working on it in my own time, Python was used in the Amoeba project with increasing success, and the feedback from colleagues made me add many early improvements.

In February 1991, after just over a year of development, I decided to post to USENET. The rest is in the Misc/HISTORY file.


Misc/HISTORY notes the source was uploaded to alt.sources

Google Searching alt.sources gives a posting date of Feb 20 1991, 11:22
am for the message "Python 0.9.1 part 01/21", and the rest of the posts
are spread out over 19-21 Feb 1991, according to Google. The text
description in the body of the message gives a date of 19 February 1991.

If you're looking for an official "Birthday" of Python, you probably
couldn't do much better than 19 February 1991.

(Happy 14th & 1/3ish Birthday Python!)

Jul 19 '05 #4

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