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how to get function names from the file

P: n/a
I have got names of functions stored in the file. For the simplicity
expect one row only with two function names: printFoo, printFOO
In my code I would like to define functions and then to read function
names from the file, so the functions can be executed in the order the
function names are stored in a file.

While trying to read the names from the file I am getting always
"strings" and I am not able to execute them.

I would like to write my code so it will look something like:

def printFoo():
print "foo"

def printFOO():
print "FOO"

# here I would like to read the file with the function names sequences
# and to create tuple which will contain the function names.
# After that I would like to call functions from the tuple:

functions=(printFoo, printFOO)
for function in functions:
function()

Thanks for your postings
Petr Jakes

Feb 15 '06 #1
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7 Replies


P: n/a
Try the following:

def printFoo():
print "Foo"

def printFOO():
print "FOO"

functions = ("printFoo", "printFOO") # list or tuple of strings from
file, or wherever
for function in functions:
call = function + "()"
eval(call)

Feb 15 '06 #2

P: n/a
Petr Jakes wrote:
I have got names of functions stored in the file. For the simplicity
expect one row only with two function names: printFoo, printFOO
In my code I would like to define functions and then to read function
names from the file, so the functions can be executed in the order the
function names are stored in a file.

While trying to read the names from the file I am getting always
"strings" and I am not able to execute them.

I would like to write my code so it will look something like:

def printFoo():
print "foo"

def printFOO():
print "FOO"

# here I would like to read the file with the function names sequences
# and to create tuple which will contain the function names.


If the functions are in the same module as the calling code:
functions=('printFoo', 'printFOO')
for function in functions:
globals()[function]()

If the functions are in a 'functions' module:
funcs=('printFoo', 'printFOO')
for function in funcs:
getattr(functions, function)()

Kent
Feb 15 '06 #3

P: n/a
The following will return a dictionary containing the names and
functions of all the public functions in the current module. If a
function starts with an underscore _, it is considered private and not
listed.

def _ListFunctions():
import sys
import types
d = {}
module = sys.modules[__name__]
for key, value in module.__dict__.items():
if type(value) is types.FunctionType:
fnname = value.__name__
if fnname[0] != '_':
d[value.__name__] = value
return d

Feb 15 '06 #4

P: n/a

"Petr Jakes" <mc********@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:11**********************@g14g2000cwa.googlegr oups.com...
I have got names of functions stored in the file. For the simplicity
expect one row only with two function names: printFoo, printFOO
In my code I would like to define functions and then to read function
names from the file, so the functions can be executed in the order the
function names are stored in a file.

While trying to read the names from the file I am getting always
"strings" and I am not able to execute them.

I would like to write my code so it will look something like:

def printFoo():
print "foo"

def printFOO():
print "FOO"
Make a dict mapping names to functions:

funs = {'printFoo':printFoo, 'printFOO':printFOO}
# here I would like to read the file with the function names sequences
# and to create tuple which will contain the function names.
# After that I would like to call functions from the tuple:


Actually, str.split, the easiest way to separate the multiple names on a
line, gives you a list. Same difference to 'for'.

funnames=('printFoo', 'printFOO')
for fname in funnames:
funs[fname]()

Terry Jan Reedy

Feb 15 '06 #5

P: n/a
Petr Jakes wrote:
I have got names of functions stored in the file. For the simplicity
expect one row only with two function names: printFoo, printFOO
In my code I would like to define functions and then to read function
names from the file, so the functions can be executed in the order the
function names are stored in a file.

While trying to read the names from the file I am getting always
"strings" and I am not able to execute them.

I would like to write my code so it will look something like:

def printFoo():
print "foo"

def printFOO():
print "FOO"

# here I would like to read the file with the function names sequences
# and to create tuple which will contain the function names.
# After that I would like to call functions from the tuple:

functions=(printFoo, printFOO)
for function in functions:
function()

Thanks for your postings
Petr Jakes

I would do this as follows:

Create dictionary with the function names as keys and the pointer to
function definition as value:

fdict={'printFoo': printFoo, 'printFOO': printFOO}
functions=('printFoo', 'printFOO')
for function in function:
if fdict.has_key(function: fdict[function]()
else:
print "No function named=%s defined" % function

-Larry Bates

Feb 16 '06 #6

P: n/a
Petr Jakes wrote:
I have got names of functions stored in the file. For the simplicity
expect one row only with two function names: printFoo, printFOO
In my code I would like to define functions and then to read function
names from the file, so the functions can be executed in the order the
function names are stored in a file.
Somehow, when people invent little languages like you are doing now,
the languages tend to grow over time...until you realize that you
should have written the scripts in Python... It's all up to you of
course, but making your code contain proper Python code might be
something to consider. Little languages are sometimes useful.

lu*************@gmail.com wrote: functions = ("printFoo", "printFOO") # list or tuple of strings from
file, or wherever
for function in functions:
call = function + "()"
eval(call)
I wouldn't do this. eval has security issues, and it's
overkill for simply finding names in a namespace as you
saw in the other replies.

Kent Johnson wrote: If the functions are in the same module as the calling code:
functions=('printFoo', 'printFOO')
for function in functions:
globals()[function]()
and Larry Bates wrote (slightly corrected): Create dictionary with the function names as keys and the pointer to
function definition as value:

fdict={'printFoo': printFoo, 'printFOO': printFOO}
functions=('printFoo', 'printFOO')
for function in functions:
if fdict.has_key(function): fdict[function]()
else:
print "No function named=%s defined" % function


These two options are basically the same. The
difference is that Kent suggest that you use a
mapping of names to functions provided by Python,
while Larry suggests that you make one yourself.
(BTW, instead of globals() you might want locals()
depending on what scope your functions are defined
in.)

While Kent's suggestion is a little less work, Larry's
suggestion buys you some more benfits:

- You can use other names than the actual function names
as keys in the dict. This means that:
-You can use reserved words (in, while etc) in your little
script
-You can rename functions and reorganize your code without
breaking your scripts.
-You can have command names in your script that contain
national characters, spaces, punctuation, start with digits,
etc (won't, stop!, 1st time, 1.2.45.start etc).

- It's safer: You control exactly what functions the
script might call. Those who write code you run eval
on can basically get arbitrary code executed.

$ cat > evil.py
print "Gotcha"
$ python
[snip]
def x(): print 'Ok' .... eval('x'+'()') Ok eval('__import__("evil") and x'+'()')

Gotcha
Ok

If you want more than just function names in your minilanguage,
you might want to have a look at the shlex module.
Feb 17 '06 #7

P: n/a
"eval" is not necessary in this case.
If you have a tuple with function names such as this: x=(printFoo,
printFOO)

you can execute them this way:
for f in x:

f()

Feb 17 '06 #8

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