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The "real" name

P: n/a
I'm playing with a sudoku GUI...just to learn more about python.

I've made 81 'cells'...actually small canvases

Part of my scheme to write the cells (all 81 of them in the gui) to a file (using the the SAVE callback/button), then
restore the gui cells from the contents of the saved file, which depends on knowing the "name" of the cell with the
focus, or one (or more) which have a number.

The print shows .9919624.9990312, but this nunber (name?) does not work in:

cell-name of cell-.create_text(18,18, text = somevar, fill = 'blue' , font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))

Also, how can I declare a variable outside of the mainloop/callback scheme which would be 'known' to the callbacks?

Thanks,
Norm

Jan 21 '06 #1
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5 Replies


P: n/a
> Part of my scheme to write the cells (all 81 of them in the gui) to a file (using the the SAVE callback/button), then
restore the gui cells from the contents of the saved file, which depends on knowing the "name" of the cell with the
focus, or one (or more) which have a number.

The print shows .9919624.9990312, but this nunber (name?) does not work in:

cell-name of cell-.create_text(18,18, text = somevar, fill = 'blue' , font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))
I'm not entirely sure what you are after here. To me it sounds better to
create names like

"cell%i" % row * column

just for the sake of having different names, but store the cell in a
2-dimensional list called e.g. "cells"

Then accessing the cell at x, y is simply

cells[x][y].create_text(...)

Does that make sense to you?

Also, how can I declare a variable outside of the mainloop/callback scheme which would be 'known' to the callbacks?


You can of course go for globals. Beside that, a callback can be
anything callable. That means that you can go for something like this:

class StatefulCallable(obkect):

def __init__(self, some_state):
self.state = some_state

def __call__(self, *args): # I'm not sure what comes with the callback
print "called with args %r and state %r" % (args, self.state)
Then pass an instance of StatefulCallable as callback.

Regards,

Diez
Jan 21 '06 #2

P: n/a
en********@hotmail.com wrote:
I'm playing with a sudoku GUI...just to learn more about python.

I've made 81 'cells'...actually small canvases

Part of my scheme to write the cells (all 81 of them in the gui) to a file (using the the SAVE callback/button), then
restore the gui cells from the contents of the saved file, which depends on knowing the "name" of the cell with the
focus, or one (or more) which have a number.

The print shows .9919624.9990312, but this nunber (name?) does not work in:

cell-name of cell-.create_text(18,18, text = somevar, fill = 'blue' ,font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))

Also, how can I declare a variable outside of the mainloop/callback scheme which would be 'known' to the callbacks?

Thanks,
Norm

How about using a dict, something like (untested):
cells = {}
for row in range(1, 10):
.. for column in range(1, 10):
.. cells[(row, column)] = canvas() # or whatever you use to create
a canvas

Then, to put a value in a given cell, you simply to
cell[(row, column)].create_text(...)

André

Jan 21 '06 #3

P: n/a
en********@hotmail.com wrote:
I'm playing with a sudoku GUI...just to learn more about python.

I've made 81 'cells'...actually small canvases

Part of my scheme to write the cells (all 81 of them in the gui) to a file (using the the SAVE callback/button), then
restore the gui cells from the contents of the saved file, which depends on knowing the "name" of the cell with the
focus, or one (or more) which have a number.

The print shows .9919624.9990312, but this nunber (name?) does not work in:

cell-name of cell-.create_text(18,18, text = somevar, fill = 'blue' , font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))

Also, how can I declare a variable outside of the mainloop/callback scheme which would be 'known' to the callbacks?

Thanks,
Norm


I guess you are using tkinter.

".9919624.9990312" in tkinter is just a string representation of the
underlying object, in this case a Canvas(). It is not up to a python
programmer to understand exactly what these numbers are. They are used
by Tcl/Tk internally.

Tk objects are not pickleable. Better is to create a datastructure that
can be pickled from info gleaned specifically with the itemcget()
method. Example code is below. See the Pickle/cPickle documentation.
They are very easy to use.

Since you haven't posted any code, I can only guess what you are doing.
But you may want to try variations on the following (read the comments):

from Tkinter import *

# This is how you may want to make a bunch of canvases in a grid.
def make_canvases(parent, rows=9, cols=9, **options):
"""
Pass in rows, cols, and any options the canvases should
require.
"""
cells = []
for i in xrange(rows):
arow = []
for j in xrange(cols):
c = Canvas(parent, **options)
c.grid(row=i, column=j)
arow.append(c)
cells.append(arow)
return cells

def demo():
"""
Tests out our make_canvases() function.
"""

# tkinter stuff--setting up
tk = Tk()
f = Frame(tk)
f.pack(expand=YES, fill=BOTH)

# make the canvases the gui-programmer way
canvases = make_canvases(f, height=25, width=25)

# individual access to canvases (remember that indices start at 0)
canvases[0][0].configure(background='orange')
canvases[7][8].create_text(14, 8, text='Bob',
fill='blue',
font=('arial', 14, 'bold'))
canvases[8][8].create_text(14, 8, text='9,9',
fill='blue',
font=('arial', 14, 'bold'))

# accessing inside loops
for i in xrange(9):
canvases[i][8-i].configure(background='red')

# fun with bindings (see your last question)
# you should study this one!
for i in xrange(9):
for j in xrange(9):
c = canvases[i][j]
c.bind("<Button-1>",
lambda e=None, c=c: c.configure(background='green'))

# getting out info
texts = []
for i in xrange(9):
for j in xrange(9):
c = canvases[i][j]
for t in c.find_all():
try:
text = c.itemcget(t, 'text')
texts.append((i,j,text))
except:
pass

# reporting the got-out info
Label(tk, text="Texts are: %s" % texts).pack(expand=YES, fill=X)
tk.mainloop()

demo()
Jan 21 '06 #4

P: n/a
On Sat, 21 Jan 2006 14:23:49 -0800, James Stroud <js*****@ucla.edu> wrote:
en********@hotmail.com wrote:
I'm playing with a sudoku GUI...just to learn more about python.

I've made 81 'cells'...actually small canvases

Part of my scheme to write the cells (all 81 of them in the gui) to a file (using the the SAVE callback/button), then
restore the gui cells from the contents of the saved file, which depends on knowing the "name" of the cell with the
focus, or one (or more) which have a number.

The print shows .9919624.9990312, but this nunber (name?) does not work in:

cell-name of cell-.create_text(18,18, text = somevar, fill = 'blue' , font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))

Also, how can I declare a variable outside of the mainloop/callback scheme which would be 'known' to the callbacks?

Thanks,
Norm


I guess you are using tkinter.

".9919624.9990312" in tkinter is just a string representation of the
underlying object, in this case a Canvas(). It is not up to a python
programmer to understand exactly what these numbers are. They are used
by Tcl/Tk internally.

Tk objects are not pickleable. Better is to create a datastructure that
can be pickled from info gleaned specifically with the itemcget()
method. Example code is below. See the Pickle/cPickle documentation.
They are very easy to use.

Since you haven't posted any code, I can only guess what you are doing.
But you may want to try variations on the following (read the comments):

from Tkinter import *

# This is how you may want to make a bunch of canvases in a grid.
def make_canvases(parent, rows=9, cols=9, **options):
"""
Pass in rows, cols, and any options the canvases should
require.
"""
cells = []
for i in xrange(rows):
arow = []
for j in xrange(cols):
c = Canvas(parent, **options)
c.grid(row=i, column=j)
arow.append(c)
cells.append(arow)
return cells

def demo():
"""
Tests out our make_canvases() function.
"""

# tkinter stuff--setting up
tk = Tk()
f = Frame(tk)
f.pack(expand=YES, fill=BOTH)

# make the canvases the gui-programmer way
canvases = make_canvases(f, height=25, width=25)

# individual access to canvases (remember that indices start at 0)
canvases[0][0].configure(background='orange')
canvases[7][8].create_text(14, 8, text='Bob',
fill='blue',
font=('arial', 14, 'bold'))
canvases[8][8].create_text(14, 8, text='9,9',
fill='blue',
font=('arial', 14, 'bold'))

# accessing inside loops
for i in xrange(9):
canvases[i][8-i].configure(background='red')

# fun with bindings (see your last question)
# you should study this one!
for i in xrange(9):
for j in xrange(9):
c = canvases[i][j]
c.bind("<Button-1>",
lambda e=None, c=c: c.configure(background='green'))

# getting out info
texts = []
for i in xrange(9):
for j in xrange(9):
c = canvases[i][j]
for t in c.find_all():
try:
text = c.itemcget(t, 'text')
texts.append((i,j,text))
except:
pass

# reporting the got-out info
Label(tk, text="Texts are: %s" % texts).pack(expand=YES, fill=X)
tk.mainloop()

demo()


Thanks for your reply, and those of others...all are helpful. As to the code I wrote (so far), her it is, complete with
some expressions that didn't work too well...:)
Thanks....Norm

#======== Start GUI CODE ======================

from Tkinter import *
import tkFileDialog

fred = Tk() # Notice I have a bias against 'top', 'master', 'root', etc

fred.title(' SUDOKU SCREEN')
#fred.geometry('400x400')
#fred.resizable(0,0)

#------------------------------ Declare 9 frames plus one for the buttons

fr1 = Frame(fred); fr2 = Frame(fred); fr3 = Frame(fred)
fr4 = Frame(fred); fr5 = Frame(fred); fr6 = Frame(fred)
fr7 = Frame(fred); fr8 = Frame(fred); fr9 = Frame(fred)
bfr = Frame(fred, relief = 'raised', borderwidth = 1, pady = 10)
#------------------------------ Set some vars

ind = [3,4,5,12,13,14,21,22,23,27,28,29,33,34,35,36,37,38 ,42,43,44,45,46,47,51,52,53,57,58,59,66,67,68,75,7 6,77]
fr_list = [fr1,fr2,fr3,fr4,fr5,fr6,fr7,fr8,fr9]
can_list = ['can1','can2','can3','can4','can5','can6','can7',' can8','can9']
cell = []
myvar = ''
mykey = 'K'
myadd = 'one'
iy = 0

#------------------------------ Create 9 frames with 9 canvases in each

for fitem in fr_list:
for item in can_list:
item = Canvas(fitem, width = 30, height = 30, borderwidth = 1, relief = 'solid')
item.pack(side = LEFT, fill = BOTH)
cell.append([item, iy, '-']) # List of [IDs, 0 to 80, key text]
iy += 1

#------------------------------ Create some supporting (callback) functions

def clr_scrn():
for iz in range(81):
cell[iz][0].delete(ALL)

def hint():
print 'Hint not implemented yet'

def solve():
print 'Solve not implemented yet'

def get_file():
cell_ID = ""
cell_list = []
root = Tk()
root.withdraw() # do this to remove the "blank screen"
filename = tkFileDialog.askopenfilename()
fp2 = open(filename, 'r+')
for line in fp2:
fp2.close()
def save_file():
cell_num = ""
cell_val = ""
total = ""
iy = 0
root = Tk()
root.withdraw() # do this to remove the "blank screen"
filename = tkFileDialog.asksaveasfilename()
fp1 = open(filename, 'w' )
fp1.close()

def mouse_in(event):
event.widget.config(highlightcolor = 'blue')
event.widget.focus_set()
print 'event', event.widget

def see_key(event):
event.widget.delete(ALL)
if event.keysym in '123456789':
event.widget.create_text(18,18, text = event.keysym, font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))
else:
event.widget.create_text(18,18, text = '', font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))
#------------------------------ Create some control buttons

b_new = Button(bfr, text = 'NEW', relief = 'raised', command = clr_scrn ).pack(side = LEFT, padx = 10)
b_open = Button(bfr, text = 'OPEN', relief = 'raised', command = get_file ).pack(side = LEFT, padx = 10)
b_save = Button(bfr, text = 'SAVE', relief = 'raised', command = save_file).pack(side = LEFT, padx = 10)
b_clr = Button(bfr, text = 'CLEAR', relief = 'raised', command = clr_scrn ).pack(side = LEFT, padx = 10)
b_hint = Button(bfr, text = 'HINT', relief = 'raised', command = hint ).pack(side = LEFT, padx = 10)
b_solve = Button(bfr, text = 'SOLVE', relief = 'raised', command = solve ).pack(side = LEFT, padx = 10)
b_exit = Button(bfr, text = 'EXIT', relief = 'raised', command = fred.quit).pack(side = LEFT, padx = 10)

#------------------------------ Now pass everything to the packer

for item in fr_list:
item.pack(side = TOP)

bfr.pack(side = TOP) # Don't forget to add the buttons

#------------------------------ Shade the sub-blocks

for ix in ind:
cell[ix][0].config(bg = 'grey')

#------------------------------ Fill in a few cells just for drill

cell[0][0].create_text(18,18, text = '3', fill = 'black', font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))
cell[1][0].create_text(18,18, text = '6', fill = 'black', font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))
cell[2][0].create_text(18,18, text = '9', fill = 'black', font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))
cell[3][0].create_text(18,18, text = '7', fill = 'black', font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))
cell[4][0].create_text(18,18, text = '5', fill = 'black', font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))
cell[5][0].create_text(18,18, text = '8', fill = 'black', font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))
cell[6][0].create_text(18,18, text = '4', fill = 'black', font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))
cell[7][0].create_text(18,18, text = '2', fill = 'black', font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))
cell[8][0].create_text(18,18, text = '1', fill = 'black', font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))
cell[77][0].create_text(18,18, text = '5', fill = 'blue' , font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))
for item in cell:
item[0].bind('<Enter>', mouse_in)
item[0].bind('<KeyPress>', see_key)
mainloop()

Jan 21 '06 #5

P: n/a
en********@hotmail.com wrote:
On Sat, 21 Jan 2006 14:23:49 -0800, James Stroud <js*****@ucla.edu> wrote:

en********@hotmail.com wrote:
I'm playing with a sudoku GUI...just to learn more about python.

I've made 81 'cells'...actually small canvases

Part of my scheme to write the cells (all 81 of them in the gui) to a file (using the the SAVE callback/button), then
restore the gui cells from the contents of the saved file, which depends on knowing the "name" of the cell with the
focus, or one (or more) which have a number.

The print shows .9919624.9990312, but this nunber (name?) does not work in:

cell-name of cell-.create_text(18,18, text = somevar, fill = 'blue' , font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))

Also, how can I declare a variable outside of the mainloop/callback scheme which would be 'known' to the callbacks?

Thanks,
Norm

I guess you are using tkinter.

".9919624.9990312" in tkinter is just a string representation of the
underlying object, in this case a Canvas(). It is not up to a python
programmer to understand exactly what these numbers are. They are used
by Tcl/Tk internally.

Tk objects are not pickleable. Better is to create a datastructure that
can be pickled from info gleaned specifically with the itemcget()
method. Example code is below. See the Pickle/cPickle documentation.
They are very easy to use.

Since you haven't posted any code, I can only guess what you are doing.
But you may want to try variations on the following (read the comments):

from Tkinter import *

# This is how you may want to make a bunch of canvases in a grid.
def make_canvases(parent, rows=9, cols=9, **options):
"""
Pass in rows, cols, and any options the canvases should
require.
"""
cells = []
for i in xrange(rows):
arow = []
for j in xrange(cols):
c = Canvas(parent, **options)
c.grid(row=i, column=j)
arow.append(c)
cells.append(arow)
return cells

def demo():
"""
Tests out our make_canvases() function.
"""

# tkinter stuff--setting up
tk = Tk()
f = Frame(tk)
f.pack(expand=YES, fill=BOTH)

# make the canvases the gui-programmer way
canvases = make_canvases(f, height=25, width=25)

# individual access to canvases (remember that indices start at 0)
canvases[0][0].configure(background='orange')
canvases[7][8].create_text(14, 8, text='Bob',
fill='blue',
font=('arial', 14, 'bold'))
canvases[8][8].create_text(14, 8, text='9,9',
fill='blue',
font=('arial', 14, 'bold'))

# accessing inside loops
for i in xrange(9):
canvases[i][8-i].configure(background='red')

# fun with bindings (see your last question)
# you should study this one!
for i in xrange(9):
for j in xrange(9):
c = canvases[i][j]
c.bind("<Button-1>",
lambda e=None, c=c: c.configure(background='green'))

# getting out info
texts = []
for i in xrange(9):
for j in xrange(9):
c = canvases[i][j]
for t in c.find_all():
try:
text = c.itemcget(t, 'text')
texts.append((i,j,text))
except:
pass

# reporting the got-out info
Label(tk, text="Texts are: %s" % texts).pack(expand=YES, fill=X)
tk.mainloop()

demo()

Thanks for your reply, and those of others...all are helpful. As to the code I wrote (so far), her it is, complete with
some expressions that didn't work too well...:)
Thanks....Norm

#======== Start GUI CODE ======================

from Tkinter import *
import tkFileDialog

fred = Tk() # Notice I have a bias against 'top', 'master', 'root', etc

fred.title(' SUDOKU SCREEN')
#fred.geometry('400x400')
#fred.resizable(0,0)

#------------------------------ Declare 9 frames plus one for the buttons

fr1 = Frame(fred); fr2 = Frame(fred); fr3 = Frame(fred)
fr4 = Frame(fred); fr5 = Frame(fred); fr6 = Frame(fred)
fr7 = Frame(fred); fr8 = Frame(fred); fr9 = Frame(fred)


Named references are useleless here, especially since you are putting
these frames into a list later. In fact, you really don't need to create
these frames because you can just use grid() to place your
canvases...except if you want resize behavior.
bfr = Frame(fred, relief = 'raised', borderwidth = 1, pady = 10)
This frame you WILL want a named reference for, because you do adress it
by name later.

#------------------------------ Set some vars

ind = [3,4,5,12,13,14,21,22,23,27,28,29,33,34,35,36,37,38 ,42,43,44,45,46,47,51,52,53,57,58,59,66,67,68,75,7 6,77]
fr_list = [fr1,fr2,fr3,fr4,fr5,fr6,fr7,fr8,fr9]
Better is to eliminate the fr# = Frame(fred) code above and replace this
latter line with:

fr_list = [Frame(fred) for i in xrange(9)]
can_list = ['can1','can2','can3','can4','can5','can6','can7',' can8','can9']
This list is largely unecessary. Can do the same thing with xrange below.
cell = []
myvar = ''
mykey = 'K'
myadd = 'one'
iy = 0

#------------------------------ Create 9 frames with 9 canvases in each

for fitem in fr_list:
for item in can_list:
item = Canvas(fitem, width = 30, height = 30, borderwidth = 1, relief = 'solid')
item.pack(side = LEFT, fill = BOTH)
cell.append([item, iy, '-']) # List of [IDs, 0 to 80, key text]
iy += 1
1. "for item in can_list" could easily be "for item in xrange(9)", this
would allow you to get rid of the can_list altogether, which will make
your code easier to read and maintain.
2. Are you sure you want to re-bind item here?
#------------------------------ Create some supporting (callback) functions

def clr_scrn():
for iz in range(81):
cell[iz][0].delete(ALL)

def hint():
print 'Hint not implemented yet'

def solve():
print 'Solve not implemented yet'

def get_file():
cell_ID = ""
cell_list = []
root = Tk()
root.withdraw() # do this to remove the "blank screen"
filename = tkFileDialog.askopenfilename()
fp2 = open(filename, 'r+')
for line in fp2:
fp2.close()
def save_file():
cell_num = ""
cell_val = ""
total = ""
iy = 0
root = Tk()
root.withdraw() # do this to remove the "blank screen"
filename = tkFileDialog.asksaveasfilename()
fp1 = open(filename, 'w' )
fp1.close()
Instantiating another Tk here can cause difficut to track-down problems
and erratic behavior if another Tk is already instantiated. Are you sure
you want to do this? You do not want 2 Tk's!!
def mouse_in(event):
event.widget.config(highlightcolor = 'blue')
event.widget.focus_set()
print 'event', event.widget

def see_key(event):
event.widget.delete(ALL)
if event.keysym in '123456789':
event.widget.create_text(18,18, text = event.keysym, font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))
else:
event.widget.create_text(18,18, text = '', font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))
Why are you re-binding event.keysym here? Clearer would be just binding
the name keysym. You may not want to mess with event in this case
because this event may get intercepted by another callback, etc.

def see_key(event):
event.widget.delete(ALL)
if keysym in '123456789':
event.widget.create_text(18,18, text = keysym,
font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))
else:
event.widget.create_text(18,18, text = '',
font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))

Note: these can now use the make_text() function below.

#------------------------------ Create some control buttons

b_new = Button(bfr, text = 'NEW', relief = 'raised', command = clr_scrn ).pack(side = LEFT, padx = 10)
b_open = Button(bfr, text = 'OPEN', relief = 'raised', command = get_file ).pack(side = LEFT, padx = 10)
b_save = Button(bfr, text = 'SAVE', relief = 'raised', command = save_file).pack(side = LEFT, padx = 10)
b_clr = Button(bfr, text = 'CLEAR', relief = 'raised', command = clr_scrn ).pack(side = LEFT, padx = 10)
b_hint = Button(bfr, text = 'HINT', relief = 'raised', command = hint ).pack(side = LEFT, padx = 10)
b_solve = Button(bfr, text = 'SOLVE', relief = 'raised', command = solve ).pack(side = LEFT, padx = 10)
b_exit = Button(bfr, text = 'EXIT', relief = 'raised', command = fred.quit).pack(side = LEFT, padx = 10)
Things like this are much better written:
def button_row(parent, individual_opts, **options):
for text, command in button_opts:
Button(parent, text=text,
command=command,
**options).pack(side = LEFT, padx = 10)

button_opts = (('NEW', clr_scrn),
('OPEN', get_file),
('SAVE', save_file),
('CLEAR', clr_scrn),
('HINT', hint),
('SOLVE', solve),
('EXIT', fred.quit))

button_row(bfr, button_opts, relief='raised')
#------------------------------ Now pass everything to the packer

for item in fr_list:
item.pack(side = TOP)

bfr.pack(side = TOP) # Don't forget to add the buttons

#------------------------------ Shade the sub-blocks

for ix in ind:
cell[ix][0].config(bg = 'grey')

#------------------------------ Fill in a few cells just for drill

cell[0][0].create_text(18,18, text = '3', fill = 'black', font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))
cell[1][0].create_text(18,18, text = '6', fill = 'black', font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))
cell[2][0].create_text(18,18, text = '9', fill = 'black', font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))
cell[3][0].create_text(18,18, text = '7', fill = 'black', font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))
cell[4][0].create_text(18,18, text = '5', fill = 'black', font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))
cell[5][0].create_text(18,18, text = '8', fill = 'black', font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))
cell[6][0].create_text(18,18, text = '4', fill = 'black', font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))
cell[7][0].create_text(18,18, text = '2', fill = 'black', font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))
cell[8][0].create_text(18,18, text = '1', fill = 'black', font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))
cell[77][0].create_text(18,18, text = '5', fill = 'blue' , font = ('arial', 18, 'bold'))

Again, use a loop and functions (approximately the same amount of typing
but 1000 times more reusability):
def make_text(acell, t, font=('arial', 18, 'bold'),
fill='black', **options):
acell.create_text(18,18, text=t, font=font, fill=fill, **options)

def fill_cells(cells, numbers)
for (c,t) in zip(range(9)), numbers[:-1]):
make_text(cell[c][0], t)
make_text(cell[77][0], text=numbers[-1], fill='blue')

numbers = '3697584215'

fill_cells(cell, numbers)
Notice how this makes filling numbers super easy, e.g.:
fill_cells(cell, '9283571649')

for item in cell:
item[0].bind('<Enter>', mouse_in)
item[0].bind('<KeyPress>', see_key)
mainloop()

James

Jan 22 '06 #6

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