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Python Cookbook, 2'nd. Edition is published

P: n/a
See http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/pythoncook2/index.html

I don't see it on Amazon yet, but you can order it from O'Reilly.

Ron Stephens
www.awaretek.com

Jul 18 '05 #1
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P: n/a
rd*****@mac.com wrote:
See http://www.oreilly.com/catalog/pythoncook2/index.html

I don't see it on Amazon yet, but you can order it from O'Reilly.

Ron Stephens
www.awaretek.com

I received my copy on Friday (because I was a contributor).

I wanted to thank Alex, Anna, and David for taking the time to put
this together. I think it is a GREAT resource, especially for
beginners. This should be required reading for anyone that
is serous about learning Python.

The example code and explanations are excellent. I found that
I learned quite a bit from some of the more advanced examples
and found several recipes that I'm sure I'll use in the future.
I think this will go on my bookshelf beside Fredrkik Lundh's
"Python Standard Library" and Mark Hammond's "Python Programming
on Win32" as a resource that I'll reference regularly.

Larry Bates
Jul 18 '05 #2

P: n/a
Hello Larry,

I don't have my copy yet. Can you give any guidance on how the 2'nd
edition compares to the 1'st edition? At 844 pages, it seems to be 250+
pages bigger than the 1'st Ed. How much of the book is new, and does it
use the same chapter headings?
Ron Stephens

Someone else asked a similar questiosn in another thread, I copy it
here..

""Is the second edition of the Python Cookbook worth getting if you
have
the first edition? How much new material is there in the 2nd edition?
Thanks,
Will McGugan ""

Jul 18 '05 #3

P: n/a
Sorry, I didn't ever have copy of 1st edition. Maybe Alex
can help us on this one?

-Larry

rd*****@mac.com wrote:
Hello Larry,

I don't have my copy yet. Can you give any guidance on how the 2'nd
edition compares to the 1'st edition? At 844 pages, it seems to be 250+
pages bigger than the 1'st Ed. How much of the book is new, and does it
use the same chapter headings?
Ron Stephens

Someone else asked a similar questiosn in another thread, I copy it
here..

""Is the second edition of the Python Cookbook worth getting if you
have
the first edition? How much new material is there in the 2nd edition?
Thanks,
Will McGugan ""

Jul 18 '05 #4

P: n/a
> > I don't have my copy yet. Can you give any guidance on how the 2'nd
edition compares to the 1'st edition?


Here is an excerpt from the preface (typing errors are mine):

If you already own the first edition, you may be wondering whether
you need this second edition, too. We think the answer is "yes." The
first edition had 245 recipes; we kep 146 of those (with lots of
editing in almost all cases), and added 192 new ones, for a total of
338 recipes in this second e4dition. So, over half of the recipes in
this edition are complete,ly new, and all the recipes are updated
to apply to today's Python -- releases 2.3 and 2.4. Indeed, this
update is the main factor which lets us have almost 100 more recipes
in a book of about the same size. The first edition covered all
versions from 1.5.2 (one sometimes earlier) to 2.2; this one focuses
fimly on 2.3 and 2.4. Thianks to the greater port of today's Python,
and, even more4, thanks to the fact that this edition avoids the
"historical" treatises about how you had to do things in Python
versions releases 5 or more years ago, we were able to provide
substantially more currently relevant recipes and information in
roughtly the same amount of space.

Trent

--
Trent Mick
Tr****@ActiveState.com
Jul 18 '05 #5

P: n/a
In article <ma*************************************@python.or g>,
Trent Mick <tr****@ActiveState.com> wrote:
> I don't have my copy yet. Can you give any guidance on how the 2'nd
> edition compares to the 1'st edition?


Here is an excerpt from the preface (typing errors are mine):

If you already own the first edition, you may be wondering whether
you need this second edition, too. We think the answer is "yes." The
first edition had 245 recipes; we kep 146 of those (with lots of
editing in almost all cases), and added 192 new ones, for a total of
338 recipes in this second e4dition. So, over half of the recipes in
this edition are complete,ly new, and all the recipes are updated
to apply to today's Python -- releases 2.3 and 2.4. Indeed, this
update is the main factor which lets us have almost 100 more recipes
in a book of about the same size. The first edition covered all
versions from 1.5.2 (one sometimes earlier) to 2.2; this one focuses
fimly on 2.3 and 2.4. Thianks to the greater port of today's Python,
and, even more4, thanks to the fact that this edition avoids the
"historical" treatises about how you had to do things in Python
versions releases 5 or more years ago, we were able to provide
substantially more currently relevant recipes and information in
roughtly the same amount of space.

Jul 18 '05 #6

P: n/a
Cameron Laird wrote:
IT'S IN THERE. The answer to all questions--well, to
surprisingly many questions--is in the Second Edition.
Even questions about the Second Edition itself are
answered therein. So, the summary: if in doubt, as-
sume that the Second Edition has what you want.


It even has been known to answer questions about the Third Edition,
using the "from future" construct publishers have wanted for years.
:-)

This is a fantastic book and my single favourite Python paper
reference. It examines problems, even those which at first seem
trivial, with an unexpected rigour and invigorating sense of
adventure. Alex Martelli and the others should be congratulated.

-- robin
Jul 18 '05 #7

P: n/a
Larry Bates wrote:
I received my copy on Friday (because I was a contributor).

I wanted to thank Alex, Anna, and David for taking the time to put
this together. I think it is a GREAT resource, especially for
beginners. This should be required reading for anyone that
is serous about learning Python.


+1.

The Python Cookbook is really great, and being included in the
contributors, even if for a little tiny idea that got heavily
refactored, feels wonderful. I'm really grateful to the python community.
--
Ciao,
Matteo
Jul 18 '05 #8

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