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Calling a function from module question.

P: n/a
Is there any way I could have the following work?

First I would have a module define a function to do
something like print some data.

----- module_name.py -----

[snip]

def print_this(data):
print "This is the data: %s" %data

[/snip]

-----------------------------
Then I would have a script that uses the
print_this function defined in the module
without using the module name in the call.

----- test_file.py -----

[snip]

import module_name.py
print_this("lots of data")

[/snip]

----------------------

Now, I know I can call the function using
module_name.print_this("lots of data")
but can using the module name at the beginning
be avoided?

If not, why? I am sure there is a good pythonic
explanation.

Thanks
Jul 18 '05 #1
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9 Replies


P: n/a
Sean wrote:
Then I would have a script that uses the
print_this function defined in the module
without using the module name in the call.


from module_name import print_this

or, even:

from module_name import print_this as other_nice_name

--Irmen
Jul 18 '05 #2

P: n/a
> Sean wrote:
Then I would have a script that uses the
print_this function defined in the module
without using the module name in the call.


from module_name import print_this

or, even:

from module_name import print_this as other_nice_name


So what if I have a whole bunch of functions - say 25 of them.
Is there a way to do this without naming each function?
Jul 18 '05 #3

P: n/a
Sean wrote:
Sean wrote:
Then I would have a script that uses the
print_this function defined in the module
without using the module name in the call.


from module_name import print_this

or, even:

from module_name import print_this as other_nice_name


So what if I have a whole bunch of functions - say 25 of them.
Is there a way to do this without naming each function?


Yes [1], but it's basically deprecated and you shouldn't use it.
Consider refactoring your code.

Steve

[1] http://docs.python.org/ref/import.html
Jul 18 '05 #4

P: n/a
>>>from module_name import print_this

or, even:

from module_name import print_this as other_nice_name


So what if I have a whole bunch of functions - say 25 of them.
Is there a way to do this without naming each function?


Yes [1], but it's basically deprecated and you shouldn't use it. Consider
refactoring your code.


Refactoring my code? Sorry, I am not sure what you mean here.

How would one refactor the example in my original post?
Jul 18 '05 #5

P: n/a
Sean wrote:
from module_name import print_this

or, even:
from module_name import print_this as other_nice_name

So what if I have a whole bunch of functions - say 25 of them.
Is there a way to do this without naming each function?


Yes [1], but it's basically deprecated and you shouldn't use it. Consider
refactoring your code.


Refactoring my code? Sorry, I am not sure what you mean here.

How would one refactor the example in my original post?


The original post only had one name to import, not 25, so refactoring
isn't really necessary. ;) What are the 25 functions you want to
import? Perhaps you can group them together in classes? Or maybe a
couple of (sub-)modules is the way to go...

STeVe
Jul 18 '05 #6

P: n/a

"Sean" <se**@buildingonline.com> wrote in message
news:UTsQd.32669$6u.27954@fed1read02...
import module_name.py


leave off the .py

Irmen answered your main question.

Terry J. Reedy

Jul 18 '05 #7

P: n/a
Sean wrote:
So what if I have a whole bunch of functions - say 25 of them.
Is there a way to do this without naming each function?


Yes [1], but it's basically deprecated and you shouldn't use it. Consider
refactoring your code.


Refactoring my code? Sorry, I am not sure what you mean here.


'Refactoring' is just a fancy way of saying 'reorganizing'. What it
means in this case is to look at the reason that you have 25 functions
in this other module whose name you don't want to type. Perhaps
reassembling those functions into a class or two will let you have
fewer names to import, or perhaps there's no compelling reason for
them to be in a different module to begin with. (Or, more likely, you
should just not worry about using the module name. It's really better
to keep track of where all of your names come from, and fully
qualified names do that nicely. What do you see as the harm of using it?)

Jeff Shannon
Technician/Programmer
Credit International

Jul 18 '05 #8

P: n/a
Sean wrote:
Sean wrote:

Then I would have a script that uses the
print_this function defined in the module
without using the module name in the call.


from module_name import print_this

or, even:

from module_name import print_this as other_nice_name

So what if I have a whole bunch of functions - say 25 of them.
Is there a way to do this without naming each function?


You do that like so: "from module import *". But you should avoid that,
as stated in the Python help:

Note that in general the practice of importing * from a module or
package is frowned upon, since it often causes poorly readable code.
However, it is okay to use it to save typing in interactive sessions,
and certain modules are designed to export only names that follow
certain patterns.

The "certain patterns" usually occur in huge packages, such as in the
various GUI toolkits. E.g., all of the exported PyQt classes are
prefaced with Q (QButtonGroup, QTabWidget), so doing "from qt import *"
is fairly safe.

You can also import a module like so: "import module as m" to save on
some typing, if that is your concern. But namespaces are a feature of
Python, not a limitation, so the Python way is to use them for clearer
code. With a large number of functions like that, it sounds more like
you should be inheriting from a class anyway, which I think is what
Steven Bethard meant when he suggested refactoring.

For more information on the Python way, go to the Python interpreter and
type "import this" ;>)

--
Soraia: http://www.soraia.com

Jul 18 '05 #9

P: n/a
Sean, if you are asking what I think you are asking (I don't think name
hiding is the issue), you can use

from module_name import *

and you will end up with all of the functions at session scope. You can
use the 'as' to alias the function names if you wish

from module_name import fn1 as myfn1, fn2 as myfn2

but, um, that gets confusing.

Jul 18 '05 #10

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