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Getting around the GIL with POSH

P: n/a
POSH, found at poshmodule.sourceforge.net , lets you share
Python objects across processes like you would among threads
and not have to resort to IPC mechanisms.

Because separate processes do not share the GIL, this allows
them to be scheduled on multiple CPUs.

Is anyone out there using POSH and is it reliable enough for
production use? Any plans to incorporate it into the Python
distribution?
Jul 18 '05 #1
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P: n/a
Jon Perez <jb********@wahoo.com> writes:
Is anyone out there using POSH and is it reliable enough for
production use? Any plans to incorporate it into the Python
distribution?


Well, I think it currently only works on x86, which is a bit of a
bind (I may be out of date).

Cheers,
mwh

--
... so the notion that it is meaningful to pass pointers to memory
objects into which any random function may write random values
without having a clue where they point, has _not_ been debunked as
the sheer idiocy it really is. -- Erik Naggum, comp.lang.lisp
Jul 18 '05 #2

P: n/a

"Jon Perez" <jb********@wahoo.com> wrote in message
news:2n***********@uni-berlin.de...
POSH, found at poshmodule.sourceforge.net , lets you share
Python objects across processes like you would among threads
and not have to resort to IPC mechanisms.

Because separate processes do not share the GIL, this allows
them to be scheduled on multiple CPUs.

Is anyone out there using POSH and is it reliable enough for
production use? Any plans to incorporate it into the Python
distribution?


You shoul have a look at Pyro (Python Remote Objects) at
http://pyro.sourceforge.net/index.html

"It is an advanced and powerful Distributed Object Technology system written
entirely in Python"

sounds like what you need.

Tom
Jul 18 '05 #3

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