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what editor do you use?

P: n/a
i'm new to python and i was wondering what editors people prefer to use
and why.
Jul 18 '05 #1
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32 Replies


P: n/a
Sticks wrote:
i'm new to python and i was wondering what editors people prefer to
use and why.


i use kdevelop because of its ease of use, syntax highlighting,
indenting, cvs built in and multiple language support. for more
features go to:
http://kdevelop.kde.org/index.html?f.../features.html

Jul 18 '05 #2

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On Sat, 26 Jun 2004 18:31:08 +1000, Sticks <ba***********@hotmail.com>
wrote:
i'm new to python and i was wondering what editors people prefer to use
and why.


Pype: it is open source, has a classbrowser, is very customisable,
code completition, ...

DrPython: same as pype, very active development; python shell
integrated.

both can be found on sourceforge.

--
Francesco
Jul 18 '05 #3

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On Sat, 26 Jun 2004 18:31:08 +1000, Sticks wrote:
i'm new to python and i was wondering what editors people prefer to use
and why.


emacs works pretty good for me...

-- dirk
Q: Why do the police always travel in threes?
A: One to do the reading, one to do the writing, and the other keeps
an eye on the two intellectuals.

Jul 18 '05 #4

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Sticks wrote:
i'm new to python and i was wondering what editors people prefer to use
and why.


vim of course. :)

Jul 18 '05 #5

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Sticks wrote:
i'm new to python and i was wondering what editors people prefer to use
and why.


Eric3 - most powerfull python IDE with number of features.

--
Maciej "Fiedzia" Dziardziel (fiedzia (at) fiedzia (dot) prv (dot) pl)
www.fiedzia.prv.pl

Inquiring gnomes want to mine!
Jul 18 '05 #6

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Sticks wrote:
i'm new to python and i was wondering what editors people prefer to use
and why.


SciTE - has syntax highlighting, code folding, indenting also and i can
use it under linux and under windows

uwe
Jul 18 '05 #7

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Sticks> i'm new to python and i was wondering what editors people prefer
Sticks> to use and why.

Like everybody else you'll talk to I use the "one true editor", commonly
referred to as "God's gift to text editing". I'll leave it to you to
conclude which instantiation of the one true editor I actually use. <wink>

If you'd like some help identifying the choices, take a look here:

http://www.python.org/cgi-bin/moinmoin/PythonEditors

Skip

Jul 18 '05 #8

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"Sticks" <ba***********@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:40***********************@per-qv1-newsreader-01.iinet.net.au...
i'm new to python and i was wondering what editors people prefer to use
and why.


I've been using PythonWin because it comes with the
ActiveState distribution, and it works reasonably well.
I've been trying out jEdit because I want to do more
than just Python.

John Roth
Jul 18 '05 #9

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Sticks wrote:
i'm new to python and i was wondering what editors people prefer
to use and why.


I like Jed a lot:

- light-weight and quick

- good but simple Python mode

- syntax high-lighting. And, it's customizable, which is
especially valuable for those of us who are "color challenged".

- very strong scripting language (SLang). Very customizable.

- multiple buffers and ability to reload session (files previously
open) on a per-directory basis

- and, of course, much more.

The down-side -- since it's so customizable, you will be tempted
to spend lots of time customizing and extending Jed capabilities.

It's at: http://space.mit.edu/~davis/jedsoft/jed/

Dave
--
Dave Kuhlman
http://www.rexx.com/~dkuhlman
Jul 18 '05 #10

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Sticks <ba***********@hotmail.com> wrote:
i'm new to python and i was wondering what editors people prefer to use
and why.


I mostly use jEdit. Good points:

- single window (as opposed to IDLE)
- Console plugin
- great search & replace

Weaknesses:

- syntax highliting fooled by some raw strings (like r"\one_backslash")
- multi-line comment-out is ugly

IDLE is my second editor of choice. Good points:

- interactive shell
- data inspect after run (in the shell)
- correct syntax highliting
- good (visible) multi-line comment-out
- at least partial code completion

Weaknesses:

- separate window for each module

HTH,

AdSR
Jul 18 '05 #11

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On 2004-06-26, Sticks <ba***********@hotmail.com> wrote:
i'm new to python and i was wondering what editors people prefer to use
and why.


Main editor, vim. Small, fast, awesome syntax highlighting, doesn't get
in my way.

Secondary, boa-constructor. Builds wxPython code cleanly. I'll build the
base of the app in boa and then move to vim for the non-interface portions.

--
Steve C. Lamb | I'm your priest, I'm your shrink, I'm your
PGP Key: 8B6E99C5 | main connection to the switchboard of souls.
-------------------------------+---------------------------------------------
Jul 18 '05 #12

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Komodo. Very full featured, and the personal edition is cheap.
Jul 18 '05 #13

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Leopold Schwinger wrote:
Currently I use crimson-editor (only for win32)
http://www.crimsoneditor.com/


I use Context in win32, SciTE in Linux X, joe in Linux console.
Context is working good in Windows, I use for Zope external editor too.

FT

Jul 18 '05 #14

P: n/a
i'm new to python and i was wondering what editors people prefer to use
and why.


I have a strong Windows background, and am finding this is hurting me in
Linux :)

I have checked out almost every free text editor on the Windows platform.
For a substantial time, my favourite was ConText. About 9 months ago I
discovered a text editor called 'syn'. On Windows, this editor has
everything I want in a general-purpose text editor. If you are a windows
user, I *highly* recommend you check this editor out. I use it for LaTeX,
python, objectpascal, FORTRAN, C, VB and others at work.

At home, I am running Mandrake 10. I am struggling to find a text editor
that I can migrate to easily. For example, I think kate is superb (the
code-folding is a godsend), but I would like be able to customize a menu,
or add buttons in order to run shell commands (doing this in syn is
trivially easy). kate has a built-in terminal, but it ain't the same. A
tabbed layout would also be nice, rather than the file-selector.

I know emacs and vi/vim are super-powerful, but significant time is
required (for me, I guess) to learn how to use them effectively.

If someone has had a look at ConText or Syn, and knows of a very similar
text-editor for Linux, I would love to hear about it.

Thanks
Caleb
Jul 18 '05 #15

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Caleb Hattingh wrote:
i'm new to python and i was wondering what editors people prefer to
use and why.

I have a strong Windows background, and am finding this is hurting me
in Linux :)


Me too. I'm still in the middle of the transition to Linux.

Since I mostly work in Python, my primary need was to find a strong
Python IDE that was fairly close to PythonWin (my windows editor of
choice for Python). So far there are only two competitors left (for me):

* SciTE -- cross platform, fairly robust, simple and fast, but
configuring it to use decent fonts is a PITA (I have never managed
it). Feels much like a kit from which you could build an editor
(almost every other Python editor is built using SciTE's Scintilla
control).
* Eric3 -- provides "intellisense" or whatever you want to call it
(code-completion), tabbed interface, pretty much Win32-friendly
key-bindings (with the exception of Alt-F|eXit not working).
Current version doesn't have drag-and-drop or single-instance
support (I'm planning to hack those in and contribute them back),
but that's about the only significant problem I've encountered so
far. Eric isn't a *lightweight* product like PythonWin (which
starts almost instantly on the same hardware where Eric takes many
wall-clock seconds to start), but it does do just about everything
I need for productive Python hacking on Linux.

Just in case there are other PythonWin lovers out there making the switch,
Mike

________________________________________________
Mike C. Fletcher
Designer, VR Plumber, Coder
http://members.rogers.com/mcfletch/
blog: http://zope.vex.net/~mcfletch/plumbing/
Jul 18 '05 #16

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Caleb Hattingh <ca****@telkomsa.net> wrote in
news:op**************@news.telkomsa.net:
I know emacs and vi/vim are super-powerful, but significant time is
required (for me, I guess) to learn how to use them effectively.


The time invested in learning one of these is paid back forever in
ongoing efficiency. Other editors have large and often nice feature
sets, but for huge hands-on-the-keyboard power, it's still very hard to
beat vim or emacs (Vim for me).

Scott

Jul 18 '05 #17

P: n/a
SciTE is the editor I have been looking for all these
years.

I use it for everything these days (Python, Spyce, PHP,
Java, C#, C/C++, etc...) except when I have to work from
a command line terminal in which case I use vim.

The thing with SciTE is that most of the powerful features
are neatly tucked away until you enable them so it may
look deceptively spartan at first.

Some of the highlights:

* The code folding is superb - it even folds HTML!
* rectangular highlighting is as easy as ALT-mouse drag
* only editor I know of which syntax highlights Javascript,
HTML + PHP or Python simultaneously - in the same file!
* Can call external utilities. I use it with Astyle and
HTML Tidy. One click reformatting of source code.
* No compulsory learning of a whole bunch of convoluted
key-combinations
* powerful regex search and replace
* pretty wide support for syntax-highlighting different
languages (can write your own lexer)
* so much more...
Uwe Becher wrote:
Sticks wrote:
i'm new to python and i was wondering what editors people prefer to
use and why.

SciTE - has syntax highlighting, code folding, indenting also and i can
use it under linux and under windows

uwe

Jul 18 '05 #18

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Jon Perez said unto the world upon 02/07/2004 16:18:
SciTE is the editor I have been looking for all these
years.

I use it for everything these days (Python, Spyce, PHP,
Java, C#, C/C++, etc...) except when I have to work from
a command line terminal in which case I use vim.

The thing with SciTE is that most of the powerful features
are neatly tucked away until you enable them so it may
look deceptively spartan at first.

Some of the highlights:

* The code folding is superb - it even folds HTML!
* rectangular highlighting is as easy as ALT-mouse drag
* only editor I know of which syntax highlights Javascript,
HTML + PHP or Python simultaneously - in the same file!
* Can call external utilities. I use it with Astyle and
HTML Tidy. One click reformatting of source code.
* No compulsory learning of a whole bunch of convoluted
key-combinations
* powerful regex search and replace
* pretty wide support for syntax-highlighting different
languages (can write your own lexer)
* so much more...


<SNIP>

Hi all,

this is about SciTE rather than Python, but I'm hopeful that the [OT]
warning and the recent discussion of SciTE on this thread make that OK.
Apologies if not.

On the strength of a few posts to the now-highjacked thread I grabbed
SciTE. It looks very promising. I know from reading the docs and looking
at the config files that I should be able to configure it so that, when
editing a .py file, F1 opens the Python documentation and passes the word
at the caret as an argument. The problem is I don't know enough to be able
to correctly interpret the docs instructions (I am not a hacker ;-) Could
a SciTE fan tell me what I have to add to my config files?

Many thanks,

Brian vdB
Jul 18 '05 #19

P: n/a
I use WingIDE , Best IDE for python saves lots of typing and recalling
effort through its auto completion.
Jon Perez <jb********@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:<2k************@uni-berlin.de>...
SciTE is the editor I have been looking for all these
years.

I use it for everything these days (Python, Spyce, PHP,
Java, C#, C/C++, etc...) except when I have to work from
a command line terminal in which case I use vim.

The thing with SciTE is that most of the powerful features
are neatly tucked away until you enable them so it may
look deceptively spartan at first.

Some of the highlights:

* The code folding is superb - it even folds HTML!
* rectangular highlighting is as easy as ALT-mouse drag
* only editor I know of which syntax highlights Javascript,
HTML + PHP or Python simultaneously - in the same file!
* Can call external utilities. I use it with Astyle and
HTML Tidy. One click reformatting of source code.
* No compulsory learning of a whole bunch of convoluted
key-combinations
* powerful regex search and replace
* pretty wide support for syntax-highlighting different
languages (can write your own lexer)
* so much more...
Uwe Becher wrote:
Sticks wrote:
i'm new to python and i was wondering what editors people prefer to
use and why.

SciTE - has syntax highlighting, code folding, indenting also and i can
use it under linux and under windows

uwe

Jul 18 '05 #20

P: n/a
Brian van den Broek:
On the strength of a few posts to the now-highjacked thread I grabbed
SciTE. It looks very promising. I know from reading the docs and looking
at the config files that I should be able to configure it so that, when
editing a .py file, F1 opens the Python documentation and passes the word
at the caret as an argument. The problem is I don't know enough to be able
to correctly interpret the docs instructions (I am not a hacker ;-) Could
a SciTE fan tell me what I have to add to my config files?


There is a SciTE mailing list at
http://mailman.lyra.org/mailman/listinfo/scite-interest

You can try to set your properties similar (based on where you have
installed Python) to

command.help.*.py=$(CurrentWord)!G:\Python23\Doc\P ython23.chm
command.help.subsystem.*.py=4

Most of the time this needs a separate press of the Enter key or
selection from a list of topics after the documenation has been activated.

Neil
Jul 18 '05 #21

P: n/a
Neil Hodgson said unto the world upon 03/07/2004 05:30:
Brian van den Broek:

On the strength of a few posts to the now-highjacked thread I grabbed
SciTE. It looks very promising. I know from reading the docs and looking
at the config files that I should be able to configure it so that, when
editing a .py file, F1 opens the Python documentation and passes the word
at the caret as an argument. The problem is I don't know enough to be able
to correctly interpret the docs instructions (I am not a hacker ;-) Could
a SciTE fan tell me what I have to add to my config files?

There is a SciTE mailing list at
http://mailman.lyra.org/mailman/listinfo/scite-interest

You can try to set your properties similar (based on where you have
installed Python) to

command.help.*.py=$(CurrentWord)!G:\Python23\Doc\P ython23.chm
command.help.subsystem.*.py=4

Most of the time this needs a separate press of the Enter key or
selection from a list of topics after the documenation has been activated.

Neil


Thanks Neil, that worked like a charm. (I had tried the elements, but
didn't have the correct grammar for combining them.)

And, assuming that you are the same N. Hodgson, thanks for making SCiTE
available, too!

Best to all,

Brian vdB
Jul 18 '05 #22

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Leopold Schwinger wrote:
Currently I use crimson-editor (only for win32)
http://www.crimsoneditor.com/


i also use crimson-editor for everything on win32.
Jul 18 '05 #23

P: n/a
Sticks <ba***********@hotmail.com> wrote:
i'm new to python
Welcome to the club!
and i was wondering what editors people prefer to use
This is an issue which tends to evoke emotional responses, religious
arguments, and flame wars. Fortunately, I am above all that childish
nonsense and can tell you that emacs is the One True Editor and if you
use anything else you're a vile, demented, cretinous sociopath.
and why.


Because I'm not a vile, demented, cretinous sociopath :-)

Seriously, use whatever editor you like. People use all sorts of
things. Some people don't even use stand-alone text editors, but rather
some kind of IDE (Integrated Development Environment). Perhaps the one
hard and fast requirement is that whatever you pick can be made to
either only use spaces or only use tabs for indenting.

My personal belief is that using all spaces is the way to go. Other
people can make some reasonable arguments why all tabs is better. But
either is certainly better than mixing them, which will give you
incalculable grief. If you DAGS for "tab space indent python" you'll
find enough reading material on the topic to keep you busy for a while.
Jul 18 '05 #24

P: n/a
Roy Smith wrote:
This is an issue which tends to evoke emotional responses, religious
arguments, and flame wars. Fortunately, I am above all that childish
nonsense and can tell you that emacs is the One True Editor and if you
use anything else you're a vile, demented, cretinous sociopath.


You forgot the "x" from the begining of emacs :-)

Roger
Jul 18 '05 #25

P: n/a
>>>>> "Roy" == Roy Smith <ro*@panix.com> writes:

Roy> some kind of IDE (Integrated Development Environment).
Roy> Perhaps the one hard and fast requirement is that whatever
Roy> you pick can be made to either only use spaces or only use
Roy> tabs for indenting.

New code should only have spaces. It's official, or at least "strongly
preferred".

Roy> My personal belief is that using all spaces is the way to go.
Roy> Other people can make some reasonable arguments why all tabs
Roy> is better. But

Well, not really. The only excuse to use tabs is using a broken editor
that can't produce spaces when pressing tab. If one is just choosing
an editor, it's easy to avoid broken ones.

Roy> incalculable grief. If you DAGS for "tab space indent
Roy> python" you'll find enough reading material on the topic to
Roy> keep you busy for a while.

And also get an interesting glimpse at the dark side of the Python
community ;-).

--
Ville Vainio http://tinyurl.com/2prnb
Jul 18 '05 #26

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[Jon]
[SciTE] can call external utilities. I use it with Astyle and
HTML Tidy. One click reformatting of source code.


"One click"? You mean can run the current buffer through an external
program and replace the buffer with the output? How do you do that?

Thanks,

--
Richie Hindle
ri****@entrian.com
Jul 18 '05 #27

P: n/a

Question about Scite :

I like it, it's very fast ! However it insists on saving the current
buffer when I switch to another buffer, and deletes the Undo history. This
is very annoying. Any idea how to fix that ?

Thanks !
Jul 18 '05 #28

P: n/a
Pierre-Frédéric Caillaud said unto the world upon 05/07/2004 05:04:

Question about Scite :

I like it, it's very fast ! However it insists on saving the current
buffer when I switch to another buffer, and deletes the Undo history.
This is very annoying. Any idea how to fix that ?

Thanks !


Salut Pierre-Frédéric,

I have only had SciTE for a few days, so I am no expert. But mine doesn't
do that. You might try the User properties File (you can open it via the
options menu). In the #Checking section there is an option for reloads
preserving undos. That is the only setting I can think of that I changed
and might be related. (The documentation for SciTE walks through some of
the less intuitive settings.)

HTH

Brian vdB
Jul 18 '05 #29

P: n/a
On Sat, 03 Jul 2004 04:18:12 +0800, Jon Perez <jb********@yahoo.com>
wrote:
SciTE is the editor I have been looking for all these
years.
[...] Some of the highlights:

* The code folding is superb - it even folds HTML!
[...]

and class browser.

if you have wxpython installed, there is a class browser add-on.

(in german):
http://python.sandtner.net/viewtopic...light=wxpython

Download:
http://www-public.tu-bs.de:8080/~y00...itebrowser.zip

and add to your python.properties file:

command.name.2.*=Class Browser
command.2.*="E:\EigDat\Python\scitebrowser\scitebr owser.pyw"
"$(FileDir)" "$(WindowID)"
command.subsystem.2.*=2

replace the path with your location of scite browser:
command.2.*="E:\EigDat\Python\scitebrowser\scitebr owser.pyw"
--
Franz Steinhaeusler
Jul 18 '05 #30

P: n/a
On Sat, 03 Jul 2004 04:18:12 +0800, Jon Perez <jb********@yahoo.com>
wrote:
* Can call external utilities. I use it with Astyle and
HTML Tidy. One click reformatting of source code.


astyle (from sourceforge(?)) handles python code?
if so, how can you integrate it into the scite editor?

thank you in advance,
--
Franz Steinhaeusler
Jul 18 '05 #31

P: n/a
Franz Steinhaeusler wrote:
astyle (from sourceforge(?)) handles python code?
if so, how can you integrate it into the scite editor?
ri****@entrian.com wrote:
"One click"? You mean can run the current buffer through an external
program and replace the buffer with the output? How do you do that?
Learned the stuff below from the SciTE docs... you should
also post future questions in the scite-interest list at
lyra.org so we won't be OT here in comp.lang.python.

My Astyle and HTMLTidy settings are as follows:

In cpp.properties...

command.name.0.$(file.patterns.cpp)=Astyle File
command.0.$(file.patterns.cpp)=astyle --style=kr -s2 -o $(FileNameExt)
command.is.filter.0.$(file.patterns.cpp)=1
In html.properties...

command.name.0.$(file.patterns.tidy)=Tidy Entire File
command.0.$(file.patterns.tidy)=tidy -q -m "$(FileNameExt)"
commmand.save.before.0.$(file.patterns.tidy)=1
command.is.filter.0.$(file.patterns.tidy)=1

command.name.1.$(file.patterns.tidy)=Tidy Selection
command.1.$(file.patterns.tidy)=tidy -q --show-body-only yes
command.input.1.$(file.patterns.tidy)=$(CurrentSel ection)
command.replace.selection.1.$(file.patterns.tidy)= 1
command.quiet.1.$(file.patterns.tidy)=1

command.name.2.$(file.patterns.tidy)=Tidy Lint
commmand.save.before.2.$(file.patterns.tidy)=1
command.2.$(file.patterns.tidy)=tidy -q -o nul "$(FileNameExt)"

(Tidy integration for Selection and Lint is not as clean as I would want...)
Pierre-Frédéric wrote:
I like it, it's very fast ! However it insists on saving the current
buffer when I switch to another buffer, and deletes the Undo history.
This is very annoying. Any idea how to fix that ?


Set reload.preserves.undo=1 in SciTEGlobal.properties might fix this.
Jul 18 '05 #32

P: n/a
Ville Vainio <vi***@spammers.com> wrote:
Well, not really. The only excuse to use tabs is using a broken editor
that can't produce spaces when pressing tab.


Oh, I see! You want abuse - that's down the hall.

--
To read a book, to think it over, and to write out notes
is a useful exercise; a book which will not repay some hard thought
is not worth publishing. -- Maria Mitchell
Jul 18 '05 #33

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