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approx 100 assorted computer/ math/other books

P: n/a
The approximately 100 books below are for sale. Mostly a selection of mathematics
(numerical analysis mostly), computing science (graphics, ai, programming techniques,
theory, compilers, operating systems, Unix, languages (C, C++, Smalltalk, Java, Pascal,
Modula etc.), and a sprinkling of others (e.g. surviving as a consultant, writing
resumes, and so on).

Most are either new or in as-new condition. Some older ones have begun to attract
interest from collectors and that is noted (either as "Collectible" or "OOP"). The prices
are the average asking price by resellers for each book during October, and in cases
where there is insufficient activity to derive a price that way the price is set to 45%
of the list price for the book. Buyer pays for shipping by whatever method they select.

If you are interested in a book reply by email but don't forget to remove the "ABC" from
my reply address.

Listing format:

Title, Author(s), ISBN or ASIN or LCCCN, comments
Asking price US $/Asking price CDN $
Applied Cryptograghy. 2nd Ed. Schneier. 0-471-11709-9
$36.00/$48.00

Computer Algorithms. Baase, 0-201-00327-9
$11.00/$14.67

Numerical Solutions of Partial Differential
Equations in Science and Engineering. Lapidus/Pinder. 0-471-09866-3
$90.00/$120.00

Discrete Mathematical Structures With Applications to Computer Science.
Tremblay/Manohar. OOP, 0-07-065142-6
$22.05/$29.40

The Finite Difference Method in Partial Differntial Equations.
Mitchell/Griffiths. 0-471-27641-3 OOP
$150.00/$200.00

Elements of Discrete Mathematics. Liu. 0-07-038133-x OOP
$47.25/$63.00

Numerical Recipes in C. Press/Flannery/Teukolsky/Vetterling.
0-521-35465-X
$36.00/$48.00

Practical C++ Programming. Oualline. 1-56592-139-9
$19.00/$25.33

C++ Programming. Berry. 0-672-22619-7 OOP
$29.00/$38.67

The Mythical Man-Month. Brooks, Jr. 0-201-83595-9
$23.00/$30.67

Computer Architecture and Parallel Processing.
Hwang/Briggs. 0-07-031556-6
$40.95/$54.60

Digital Computer Fundamentals. Bartee. 07-003891-0 OOP
$20.00/$26.67

Operating Systems Concepts. Peterson/Silberschatz. 0-201-06097-3
$20.70/$27.60

Operating Systems. Katzan, Jr. 0-442-24253-0. 1st Ed. Collectible
$17.00/$22.67

Foundations of Microprogramming. Agrawala/Rauscher. 0-12-045150-6
$27.00/$36.00

Knock 'em Dead Resumes. Yate. 1-55850-086-3
$9.00/$12.00

The Programmers Survival Guide. Ruhl. 0-13-730375-0
$10.00/$13.33

How To Write A Useable User Manual. Weiss. 0-89495-052-5 OOP
$24.00/$32.00

Programmers And Managers. Kraft. 0-387-90248-1 OOP
$25.00/$33.33

The Computer Consultants Guide. Ruhl. 0-471-59661-2
$18.00/$24.00

Virtual Reality. Rheingold. 0-671-69363-8 OOP
$16.00/$21.33

The Design and Analysis of Computer Algorithms.
Aho/Hopcroft/Ullman. 0-201-00029-6 Collectible
$40.00/$53.33

Data Structures and Algorithms. Aho/Hopcroft/Ullman. 0-201-00023-7
$33.00/$44.00

Elements of the Theory of Computation. Lewis/Papadimitriou. 0-13-273417-6.
Collectible.
$50.00/$66.67

Programming Languages, Information Structures, and Machine Organization.
Computer Science Series ASIN 0070689814
$11.00/$14.67

Applied Differential Equations. 2nd Ed. Spiegel. LCCCN 67-10753
$42.00/$56.00

The Finite Element Method in Partial Differential Equations.
Mitchell/Wait. 0-471-99405-7 OOP, limited availability
$30.00/$40.00

Software Portability with Imake. 2nd Edition Dubois. 1-56592-226-3
$14.85/$19.80

Computer Networks. Tanenbaum. 0-13-165185-8; collectible
$39.60/$52.80

Unix Network Programming. Stevens. 0-13-949876-1
$50.00/$66.67

Writing Windows VxDs and Device Drivers. Hazzah 0-87930-438-3
$22.50/$30.00

Writing Windows WDM Device Drivers. Cant. 0-87930-565-7 collectible
$37.00/$49.33

Oracle8i For Dummies. McCullough-Dieter. 0-7645-0798-2
$14.00/$18.67

SQL For Dummies. Taylor. 0-7645-0737-0
$14.00/$18.67

Access 2002 For Dummies. Kaufeld. 0-7645-0818-0
$13.00/$17.33

Windows NT Workstation Version 4.0. 2nd Ed. Stinson/Siechert. 1-57231-226-2
$15.00/$20.00

Dos 5 instant Reference. Thomas. 0-89588-804-1
$7.00/$9.33

Mastering Windows 95. Cowart. 0-7821-1413-X
$24.75/$33.00

Object oriented analysis and design with applications.
Booch 2nd Ed. 0-8053-5340-2
$42.00/$56.00

Open GL programming for Windows 95 and Windows NT.
Fosner. 0-201-40709-4
$32.00/$42.67

The design and evolution of C++. Stroustrup. 0-201-54330-3
$30.00/$40.00

Graphics gems I. Glassner. 0-12-286165-5
$32.00/$42.67

Graphics gems II. Arvo. 0-12-064480-0
$34.00/$45.33

Graphics gems III (w. Mac disk). Kirk. 0-12-409671-9
$43.00/$57.33

$100 US ($135 CDN) for all three Graphics Gems.

Designing object-oriented user interfaces. Collins. 0-8053-5350-x
$41.00/$54.67

MP3 The Definitive Guide. Hacker. 1-56592-661-7
$13.50/$18.00

Object-oriented programming for windows. Tello. 0-471-52754-8
$13.50/$18.00

Creating your own Netscape web pages. Shafran. 0-7897-0621-0 includes source cd
$8.00/$10.67

Instant UML. Muller. 1-861000-87-1
$21.00/$28.00

Sams teach yourself UML in 24 hours. Schmuller. 0-672-31636-6
$11.00/$14.67

Building web applications with UML. Conallen. 0-201-61577-0
$18.00/$24.00

IBM Smalltalk. Smith. 0-8053-0908-x 1994
$44.00/$58.67

Firewalls and internet security. Cheswick-Bellovin. 0-201-63357-4
$19.00/$25.33

Just Java 2 fourth edition. Linden. 0-13-010534-1 1999
$21.00/$28.00

Java servlet programming. Hunter-Crawford. 1-56592-391-x 1998
$20.25/$27.00

Managing internet information services.
Liu/Peek/Jones/Buus/Nye. 1-56592-062-7
1994
$13.50/$18.00

Internetworking with TCP/IP Volume 3 2nd Ed.
Comer/Stevens. 0-13-260969-x 1996
$47.00/$62.67

UML in a nutshell. Alhir. 1-56592-448-7 1998
$13.00/$17.33

HTML Source book. Graham. 0-471-11849-4 1995
$13.50/$18.00

IPng and the TCP/IP protocols. Thomas. 0-471-13088-5 1996
$29.00/$38.67

Code complete. McConnell. 1-55615-484-4 1993
$22.00/$29.33

Writing solid code. Maguire. 1-55615-551-4 1993
$19.00/$25.33

Object-oriented modeling and design. Rumbaugh/Blaha/Premerlani/Eddy/Lorensen
0-13-629841-9
$46.00/$61.33

Writing device drivers for SCO UNIX a Practical Approach.
Kettle/Statler. Lots of good non-Sco info as
well. 0-201-54425-3 OOP unavailable
$45.00/$60.00

UNIX papers for UNIX developers and power users.
The Waite Group. 0-672-22578-6 1987
$12.15/$16.20

The handbook of artificial intelligence.
(Series)
Volume 1. Barr & Feigenbaum
0-86576-005-5 1981
Volume 2. Barr & Feigenbaum
0-86576-006-3 1982
Volume 3. Cohen & Feigenbaum
0-86576-007-1 1982
$89.00/$123

Fundamentals of interactive computer graphics.
Foley/Van Dam 0-201-14468-9
$20.25/$27.00

Interactive Computer Graphics. Giloi. 0-13-469189-x 1978 collectible
$16.00/$21.33

The Auerbach Annual 1973 best computer papers.
Auerbach (Ed.) 0-87769-175-4 no price info
available
$10.00/$13.33

Artificial intelligence 2nd edition Winston. 0-201-08259-4 1984 collectible
$22.50/$30.00

The systems programming series: Compiler Design Theory.
Lewis/Rosenkrantz/Stearns 0-201-14455-7
1976
$19.00/$25.33

Introduction to Artificial intelligence. Charniak/McDermott 0-201-11945-5 1985
Collectible
$17.55/$23.40

Modern structured analysis. Yourdon. 0-13-598624-9 1989 Collectible
$38.00/$50.67

Principles of compiler design. Aho/Ullman. 0-201-00022-9 1979
$22.00/$29.33

Compiler construction. Waite/Goos. 0-387-90821-8, 3-540-90821-8
1985
$29.00/$38.67

An introduction to database systems. Date. 0-201-14452-2 1975 new price
unavailable
$12.00/$16.00

Relational information systems. Merrett. 0-8359-6642-9 1984 Collectible
$22.00/$29.33

Smalltalk-80 the language and its implementation.
Goldberg/Robson. 0-201-11371-6 1983
Collectible to $125
$100.00/$133.33

Programming in modula-2. Wirth. 3-540-12206-0 and 0-387-12206-0 1983
$22.00/$29.33

A Guide to PL/I. Pollack/Sterling 03-073295-1 1969 This is 1st
ed
$35.00/$46.67

Distributed Databases principles & systems. Ceri-Pelagatti. 0-07-010829-3 1984
$30.15/$40.20

Standard C. Plauger/Brodie 1-55615-158-6
$5.00/$6.67

Linux Programming White Papers. Rusling/Pomerantz/Goldt/Raymond. 1-57610-
473-7
$16.00/$21.33

Developing CGI Applications with Perl. Deep/Holfelder. 0-471-14158-5
$16.00/$21.33

Computer Chess. Monroe Newborn. 0-12-517250-8
$24.00/$32.00

An Introduction to Raytracing. Glassner. 0-2-286160-4
$64.00/$85.33

Jul 18 '05 #1
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25 Replies


P: n/a
tn****@canadawired.com wrote:

[snip - list of assorted computer/math/other books]

I'm not familiar with the assort. Can you explain the algorithm?

/david

--
Andre, a simple peasant, had only one thing on his mind as he crept
along the East wall: 'Andre, creep... Andre, creep... Andre, creep.'
-- unknown
Jul 18 '05 #2

P: n/a
David Rubin wrote:
tn****@canadawired.com wrote:

[snip - list of assorted computer/math/other books]

I'm not familiar with the assort. Can you explain the algorithm?


Properly speaking, this is the "as sort" -- that is, sorted as you
would like it to be. The arguments most implementations accept are
"if", "is", or <something else>.

The "as is" sort is the most time-efficient, but boring, variation

The "as if" sort is the most fantastic, but in some of the newer
implementations it produces no usable results apart from denial that
any actual action is necessary.

The "as something else" sort is more complex and its exact effect
depends on the something specified. For example: an "as telephone
numbers" sort will substitute the digits from a telephone keypad for
letters in the text and sort accordingly. See the manual for more
information.

Hope that helps.

--
rzed
Jul 18 '05 #3

P: n/a
Here is a sorting method that has the potential of being the fastest.
1. check if sorted, if so you are done
2. randomize the collection, go to 1

"rzed" <Di*********@lexisnexis.com> wrote in message
news:bn**********@mailgate2.lexis-nexis.com...
David Rubin wrote:
tn****@canadawired.com wrote:

[snip - list of assorted computer/math/other books]

I'm not familiar with the assort. Can you explain the algorithm?


Properly speaking, this is the "as sort" -- that is, sorted as you
would like it to be. The arguments most implementations accept are
"if", "is", or <something else>.

The "as is" sort is the most time-efficient, but boring, variation

The "as if" sort is the most fantastic, but in some of the newer
implementations it produces no usable results apart from denial that
any actual action is necessary.

The "as something else" sort is more complex and its exact effect
depends on the something specified. For example: an "as telephone
numbers" sort will substitute the digits from a telephone keypad for
letters in the text and sort accordingly. See the manual for more
information.

Hope that helps.

--
rzed

Jul 18 '05 #4

P: n/a
David Rubin wrote:
> tn****@canadawired.com wrote:
>
> [snip - list of assorted computer/math/other books]
>
> I'm not familiar with the assort. Can you explain the algorithm?

At 3:46 AM +0000 10/22/03, Phil... wrote:Here is a sorting method that has the potential of being the fastest.
1. check if sorted, if so you are done
2. randomize the collection, go to 1


I think that 'assorted' is actually a typo. He meant asorted - as in
a big pile of books in random order. So just step 2 is necessary.

Anthony
--
----------------------------------------------------
HyPEraCtiVE? HeY, WhO aRE YoU cALliNg HypERaCtIve?!
aB*****@wEStNeT.cOm.aU
----------------------------------------------------

Jul 18 '05 #5

P: n/a
"Phil..." wrote:

Here is a sorting method that has the potential of being the fastest.
1. check if sorted, if so you are done
2. randomize the collection, go to 1


You have reinvented bogosort. Please do not toppost.

--
Chuck F (cb********@yahoo.com) (cb********@worldnet.att.net)
Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
<http://cbfalconer.home.att.net> USE worldnet address!
Jul 18 '05 #6

P: n/a
On Wed, 22 Oct 2003 15:56:38 GMT, CBFalconer <cb********@yahoo.com>
wrote or quoted :

You have reinvented bogosort. Please do not toppost.


I would like to make a different request. Make sure you say something
original within the first 15 lines of a post. I get quite annoyed
with folk who DON'T top post, quote 3 pages that I have already read,
and then add one silly wisecrack.

STOP QUOTING SO FUCKING MUCH. READING SOMETHING ONCE IS ENOUGH!!

--
Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
Coaching, problem solving, economical contract programming.
See http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jgloss.html for The Java Glossary.
Jul 18 '05 #7

P: n/a
Roedy Green <ro***@seewebsite.com> scribbled the following
on comp.lang.c:
On Wed, 22 Oct 2003 15:56:38 GMT, CBFalconer <cb********@yahoo.com>
wrote or quoted :
You have reinvented bogosort. Please do not toppost.
I would like to make a different request. Make sure you say something
original within the first 15 lines of a post. I get quite annoyed
with folk who DON'T top post, quote 3 pages that I have already read,
and then add one silly wisecrack. STOP QUOTING SO FUCKING MUCH. READING SOMETHING ONCE IS ENOUGH!!
Are you referring to CBFalconer's quoting of Phil...? Here it is in its
entirety:
---------------------------------------------------------------- Here is a sorting method that has the potential of being the fastest.
1. check if sorted, if so you are done
2. randomize the collection, go to 1

----------------------------------------------------------------
Three lines. *LINES*, mind you, not *PAGES*. You, Roedy, might well
use one-line pages, but I wouldn't, because that would severely hamper
the reading of Usenet.

I, personally, get annoyed by people who top-post. Period.

--
/-- Joona Palaste (pa*****@cc.helsinki.fi) ------------- Finland --------\
\-- http://www.helsinki.fi/~palaste --------------------- rules! --------/
"That's no raisin - it's an ALIEN!"
- Tourist in MTV's Oddities
Jul 18 '05 #8

P: n/a
On 22 Oct 2003 20:08:04 GMT, Joona I Palaste <pa*****@cc.helsinki.fi>
wrote or quoted :
Are you referring to CBFalconer's quoting of Phil...? Here it is in its
entirety:


neither. I waited for an opportunity to vent on this without picking
on a specific culprit. The practice of mindless quoting is
widespread.

I believe you should only quote the bare minimum. Just quote what you
are commenting on. Just quote the bare minimum to set the context for
your post. If someone wants to study the original post, they can hit
up arrow. Rereading and rereading previously posted material should
be the exception, not the rule.

But the posts that are most annoying are the ones that make you scroll
down and down and down to discover they are nothing but fluff.
Wisecracks SHOULD be top posted.

--
Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
Coaching, problem solving, economical contract programming.
See http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jgloss.html for The Java Glossary.
Jul 18 '05 #9

P: n/a
Roedy Green <ro***@seewebsite.com> scribbled the following
on comp.lang.c:
On 22 Oct 2003 20:08:04 GMT, Joona I Palaste <pa*****@cc.helsinki.fi>
wrote or quoted :
Are you referring to CBFalconer's quoting of Phil...? Here it is in its
entirety:
neither. I waited for an opportunity to vent on this without picking
on a specific culprit. The practice of mindless quoting is
widespread.
You should have said this when replying to CBFalconer. On Usenet, the
addressee of a reply to a post is the author of that post, if not stated
otherwise.
I believe you should only quote the bare minimum. Just quote what you
are commenting on. Just quote the bare minimum to set the context for
your post. If someone wants to study the original post, they can hit
up arrow. Rereading and rereading previously posted material should
be the exception, not the rule. But the posts that are most annoying are the ones that make you scroll
down and down and down to discover they are nothing but fluff.
Wisecracks SHOULD be top posted.


I still disagree. NOTHING should be top posted. If you find yourself
making the "but I don't want to scroll down" argument, then you're
quoting too much. Quoting less solves TWO problems: (1) you don't
have to top-post, and (2) you don't have to read pages and pages and
pages of quoted material.
I agree with you that there is too much mindless quoting, but you are
going the wrong way to get around it.

--
/-- Joona Palaste (pa*****@cc.helsinki.fi) ------------- Finland --------\
\-- http://www.helsinki.fi/~palaste --------------------- rules! --------/
"Normal is what everyone else is, and you're not."
- Dr. Tolian Soran
Jul 18 '05 #10

P: n/a
On 22 Oct 2003 21:00:48 GMT, Joona I Palaste <pa*****@cc.helsinki.fi>
wrote or quoted :
You should have said this when replying to CBFalconer. On Usenet, the
addressee of a reply to a post is the author of that post, if not stated
otherwise.


The blast is against those who complain about top posting. Top posting
is GOOD on one respect. It is at least is a step in the right
direction away from forcing people to read stuff they have seen many
times before -- especially those folk who quote with nests 10 posts
deep.

This will never be settled politically. People enjoy annoying each
other too much. I suggest a technological solution
http://mindprod.com/projmailreadernewsreader.html

--
Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
Coaching, problem solving, economical contract programming.
See http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jgloss.html for The Java Glossary.
Jul 18 '05 #11

P: n/a
On Wed, 22 Oct 2003 21:22:59 GMT, in comp.lang.c , Roedy Green
<ro***@seewebsite.com> wrote:
The blast is against those who complain about top posting. Top posting
is GOOD on one respect.
Its evil. Period.
It is at least is a step in the right
direction away from forcing people to read stuff they have seen many
times before


A better step is to blast those who don't trim posts. I /want/ to
read the context of posts. You may prefer to wander into conversations
half way through of course.
--
Mark McIntyre
CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html>
CLC readme: <http://www.angelfire.com/ms3/bchambless0/welcome_to_clc.html>
----== Posted via Newsfeed.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
http://www.newsfeed.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups
---= 19 East/West-Coast Specialized Servers - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
Jul 18 '05 #12

P: n/a
On Wed, 22 Oct 2003 23:52:03 +0100, Mark McIntyre
<ma**********@spamcop.net> wrote or quoted :
The blast is against those who complain about top posting. Top posting
is GOOD on one respect.


Its evil. Period.


I disagree. I would say it is very rare that I actually read rather
than skip over quoted material. It is just a nuisance. If people get
to the point right away they save me time. If I need to refresh
myself on the quoted material I can look it up myself. If they put
all the quoted junk at the end, at least is easier to ignore.

I think it is a superior system, but I don't use it myself because it
gets people too angry. Perhaps a compromise would be to simply label
a top post with something like "quotes follow" or "top posted" to let
you know where to find context if you need it.

Who gets annoyed by what may have to do with the features of
newsreader . Agent does not have a single key "jump to the meat" and
my hand is on the mouse during most reading. There is no quick page
down by mouse. I have to spin the scroll wheel to get to the point. I
also have to drag the mouse from the button panel where it is usually
parked to a different region of the screen to scroll.

Agent also puts those cutsie "X twirled his moustache spun around
three times and uttered ..." things in the same font as meat. I get
quite annoyed reading some of those convoluted headers to discover
they are just someone being cute.


--
Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
Coaching, problem solving, economical contract programming.
See http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jgloss.html for The Java Glossary.
Jul 18 '05 #13

P: n/a
"Serveral People" wrote in this thread, being cross-posted to at least five
newsgroups
Lots of things about topposting


Sorry, not a real quote, but then, I think at least some people in c.l.s are
not used to having discussions like that (slightly off-topic) in at least
this (c.l.s) newsgroup. So I might start another discussion about
cross-posting and off-topic-threads, knowing this being completely useless,
but this would be off-topic as well.

I know this (flaming (or something close) people for not posting or quoting
correctly) seems to happen quite often in c.l.j.*, but I've never before
seen it on c.l.s, so please keep this discussion out of (at least) c.l.s.
Jul 18 '05 #14

P: n/a
In article <9n********************************@4ax.com>,
ro***@seewebsite.com says...
On Wed, 22 Oct 2003 23:52:03 +0100, Mark McIntyre
<ma**********@spamcop.net> wrote or quoted :
Top posting is GOOD on one respect.
Its evil. Period.


I disagree.


The almighty Usenet Oracle has been awakened and declared that you
are wrong. Too bad.
I have to spin the scroll wheel to get to the point.
Sounds like you probably don't walk very much either. Man, spinning
the mouse wheel, that is tiring. *cough*
I also have to drag the mouse from the button panel where it is usually
parked to a different region of the screen to scroll.


Do you prefer Baby Swiss or Gouda with your Merlot?

--
Randy Howard _o
2reply remove FOOBAR \<,
______________________()/ ()______________________________________________
SCO Spam-magnet: po********@sco.com
Jul 18 '05 #15

P: n/a
In comp.lang.java.programmer Roedy Green <ro***@seewebsite.com> wrote:
I would like to make a different request. Make sure you say something
original within the first 15 lines of a post. I get quite annoyed
with folk who DON'T top post, quote 3 pages that I have already read,
and then add one silly wisecrack.

STOP QUOTING SO FUCKING MUCH. READING SOMETHING ONCE IS ENOUGH!!


You might benefit from the following observation:
if you have to scroll to see original text, you can safely
ignore the post, as it won't be interesting.

Stephan
Jul 18 '05 #16

P: n/a
On Wed, 22 Oct 2003 23:40:45 GMT, in comp.lang.c , Roedy Green
<ro***@seewebsite.com> wrote:
On Wed, 22 Oct 2003 23:52:03 +0100, Mark McIntyre
<ma**********@spamcop.net> wrote or quoted :
The blast is against those who complain about top posting. Top posting
is GOOD on one respect.
Its evil. Period.


I disagree. I would say it is very rare that I actually read rather
than skip over quoted material. It is just a nuisance.


And yet you retained my posting, since it added useful context. Hmm?
If people get
to the point right away they save me time.
Then like I say, they can snip the entire previous post. I tend to
ignore contextless posts in technical groups tho, as they're typically
unreadable.
If I need to refresh
myself on the quoted material I can look it up myself.
Where? Google? Get real. Presumably you don't read very many posts a
day, or else have an eidetic memory.
I think it is a superior system, but I don't use it myself because it
gets people too angry. Perhaps a compromise would be to simply label
a top post with something like "quotes follow" or "top posted" to let
you know where to find context if you need it.
in the bitbucket I'm afraid,along with the rest of any post with that
attitude. Anyone who can't post properly probably can't string
coherent thought together anyway.
Who gets annoyed by what may have to do with the features of
newsreader . Agent does not have a single key "jump to the meat"


spacebar

By the way, which of the frenzied spam of groups are you reading this
in ?
--
Mark McIntyre
CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html>
CLC readme: <http://www.angelfire.com/ms3/bchambless0/welcome_to_clc.html>
----== Posted via Newsfeed.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
http://www.newsfeed.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups
---= 19 East/West-Coast Specialized Servers - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
Jul 18 '05 #17

P: n/a
On Thu, 23 Oct 2003 17:44:57 +0100, Mark McIntyre
<ma**********@spamcop.net> wrote or quoted :
If I need to refresh
myself on the quoted material I can look it up myself.


Where? Google? Get real. Presumably you don't read very many posts a
day, or else have an eidetic memory.


In Agent. I can retrace threads at a click. They are mapped out like a
tree.

--
Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
Coaching, problem solving, economical contract programming.
See http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jgloss.html for The Java Glossary.
Jul 18 '05 #18

P: n/a
On Thu, 23 Oct 2003 09:40:03 +0000 (UTC), Stephan Eggermont
<st*****@stack.nl> wrote or quoted :
You might benefit from the following observation:
if you have to scroll to see original text, you can safely
ignore the post, as it won't be interesting.


Infuriatingly, it is not always true. Some intelligent people
APOLOGIZE for snipping even a comma from the entire previous
discussion. Somebody must have taught them you are supposed to quote
EVERYTHING.
--
Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
Coaching, problem solving, economical contract programming.
See http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jgloss.html for The Java Glossary.
Jul 18 '05 #19

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Roedy Green <ro***@seewebsite.com> scribbled the following
on comp.lang.c:
On Thu, 23 Oct 2003 09:40:03 +0000 (UTC), Stephan Eggermont
<st*****@stack.nl> wrote or quoted :
You might benefit from the following observation:
if you have to scroll to see original text, you can safely
ignore the post, as it won't be interesting.
Infuriatingly, it is not always true. Some intelligent people
APOLOGIZE for snipping even a comma from the entire previous
discussion. Somebody must have taught them you are supposed to quote
EVERYTHING.


At the very least, people should snip out signatures, barring the case
when they have an actual comment on the signature itself. Such as mine.
The quote came from Mika P. Nieminen, my former boss, who was commenting
a roast sausage.

--
/-- Joona Palaste (pa*****@cc.helsinki.fi) ------------- Finland --------\
\-- http://www.helsinki.fi/~palaste --------------------- rules! --------/
"Stronger, no. More seductive, cunning, crunchier the Dark Side is."
- Mika P. Nieminen
Jul 18 '05 #20

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Roedy Green wrote:

The blast is against those who complain about top posting. Top posting
is GOOD on one respect. It is at least is a step in the right
direction away from forcing people to read stuff they have seen many
times before -- especially those folk who quote with nests 10 posts
deep.


Top posting is never good. Just delete all the text in
the previous post if you do not have the need to include
some more specific context.

It is not that hard.

--
Thomas.

Jul 18 '05 #21

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[snipped c.l.s crosspost]

On Thu, 23 Oct 2003, Thomas Stegen wrote:

Top posting is never good. Just delete all the text in
the previous post if you do not have the need to include
some more specific context.
And if you do not feel the need to include any specific
context in your post, consider starting a new thread.
DO NOT DO THIS:

[Subject: Re: Eve's methods]

Alice wrote on Thursday, January 2, 2003, at 10:30:54.2,
in message <Al**********@foobar.net>, while birds sang
overhead and various creatures frolicked in the treetops:
Your methods are flawed.

-Alice
--
Share and enjoy.


I like cheese.

-Bob
DON'T EVEN DO THIS, ALTHOUGH IT'S BETTER:

[Subject: Re: Eve's methods]

I like cheese.

-Bob
JUST DO THIS:

[Subject: I like cheese!]

I like cheese.

-Bob
Oh, and another thing. Don't crosspost to five different
groups. That's just ridiculous. (And yes, I know in this
case it's due to a spammer. But just in general, don't.)

-Arthur
Jul 18 '05 #22

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On Thu, 23 Oct 2003 18:35:04 GMT, in comp.lang.c , Roedy Green
<ro***@seewebsite.com> wrote:
On Thu, 23 Oct 2003 17:44:57 +0100, Mark McIntyre
<ma**********@spamcop.net> wrote or quoted :
If I need to refresh
myself on the quoted material I can look it up myself.


Where? Google? Get real. Presumably you don't read very many posts a
day, or else have an eidetic memory.


In Agent. I can retrace threads at a click. They are mapped out like a
tree.


Only if your server stores them all, and you don't purge your
database.
Do you imagine that everyone has that luxury? So we should all conform
to your requirement?

And why are you posting this to so many groups? I've no clue where
you're posting from. I'm in CLC, where top posting is heavily frowned
upon. Maybe the python guys don't care - if so, remove CLC from your
crosspost.

--
Mark McIntyre
CLC FAQ <http://www.eskimo.com/~scs/C-faq/top.html>
CLC readme: <http://www.angelfire.com/ms3/bchambless0/welcome_to_clc.html>
----== Posted via Newsfeed.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet News==----
http://www.newsfeed.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups
---= 19 East/West-Coast Specialized Servers - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
Jul 18 '05 #23

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Roedy Green wrote:
<ma**********@spamcop.net> wrote or quoted :
If I need to refresh
myself on the quoted material I can look it up myself.


Where? Google? Get real. Presumably you don't read very many
posts a day, or else have an eidetic memory.


In Agent. I can retrace threads at a click. They are mapped
out like a tree.


Then you either are downloading and retaining all messages
yourself, or your ISP maintains an indefinite history of each
group (which I doubt). Sooner or later one of you is going to run
out of storage. It's something like using oil to run guzzling
SUVs.

--
Chuck F (cb********@yahoo.com) (cb********@worldnet.att.net)
Available for consulting/temporary embedded and systems.
<http://cbfalconer.home.att.net> USE worldnet address!
Jul 18 '05 #24

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"Arthur J. O'Dwyer" <aj*@nospam.andrew.cmu.edu> wrote in message
news:Pi***********************************@unix49. andrew.cmu.edu...

DO NOT DO THIS:

[Subject: Re: Eve's methods]

Alice wrote on Thursday, January 2, 2003, at 10:30:54.2,
in message <Al**********@foobar.net>, while birds sang
overhead and various creatures frolicked in the treetops:
>
> Your methods are flawed.
>
> -Alice
> --
> Share and enjoy.
>


I like cheese.


Have you been to France? They have good cheese. Actually they are more
famous for their wine. What kind of wine do you like?
Jul 18 '05 #25

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"Roedy Green" <ro***@seewebsite.com> wrote in message
news:qr********************************@4ax.com...
Infuriatingly, it is not always true. Some intelligent people
APOLOGIZE for snipping even a comma from the entire previous
discussion. Somebody must have taught them you are supposed to quote
EVERYTHING.


Yes, they learned in school or somewhere that you should plagiarize, and
should "quote all sources". They think if they snip a little something,
they're "cheating".
<snicker>
Jul 18 '05 #26

This discussion thread is closed

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