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Tkinter, wxPython, PyGtk, or PyQt...

P: n/a
I would like like to start doing some GUI-programming in Python, but don't
know which library to choose.

Tkinter seems a bit old. Correct me if I am wrong! The layout doesn't look
as nice as for the others.

wxPython seems to be the first-hand choice for people doing W32-programming
(with MFC-experience).

PyGtk seems to be a modern, very clean and nice approach, but with poor
W32-support. Is PyGtk a mature library with respect to version stability
and documentation.

PyQt is a huge library (thanks to Qt), but not free on W32, or?

Is there any possibility that any of the above-mentioned libraries will be
included as a standard library in any of the near-future Python
distributions?

I myself program on W32 at work, but use Linux at home. So, which one should
I start with in order to reduce the effort of learning something new and to
be productive in the shortest time possible?

By the way, how do I most easily include plotting capabilities to my
Python-apps?

Carl
Jul 18 '05 #1
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5 Replies


P: n/a
"ca************@chello.se" <ca************@chello.se> writes:
wxPython seems to be the first-hand choice for people doing W32-programming
(with MFC-experience).


We use wxPython for our projects and benefit from its multiplatform
support. I can write code on Linux and have it running on any *nix,
Windows and other.

It uses the GTK library in operating systems other than Windows.
I recommend going with wxPython/wxWindows.
See you,
--
Godoy. <go***@metalab.unc.edu>
Jul 18 '05 #2

P: n/a
ca************@chello.se wrote:
I would like like to start doing some GUI-programming in Python, but don't
know which library to choose.

Tkinter seems a bit old. Correct me if I am wrong! The layout doesn't look
as nice as for the others.
Yes, it's old (and others have expressed doubts about its looks). F. Lundh
is preparing a revamped version but I don't much about it.

wxPython seems to be the first-hand choice for people doing
W32-programming (with MFC-experience).
If win32 is your target and mfc your experience, pythonwin may be
what you want. wxPython is, however, cross-platform.
PyGtk seems to be a modern, very clean and nice approach, but with poor
W32-support. Is PyGtk a mature library with respect to version stability
and documentation.
Not sure, sorry.
PyQt is a huge library (thanks to Qt), but not free on W32, or?
Right, either not free or limited on win32. I got a license for it as a
part of Blackadder, now out of beta and costing $50 I believe. It's
indeed a marvel of power and ease of use on all scores, IMHO. But
if you must have the full power on win32 and can't spend that much,
it's not an option.
Is there any possibility that any of the above-mentioned libraries will be
included as a standard library in any of the near-future Python
distributions?
If you mean those made by the PSF, I don't see anything taking the
place of Tkinter in the near future. Tkinter is what wonderful free
PSF tools like IDLE are based on, so it will stay. Other distributions
are perfectly free to bundle all they want.

I myself program on W32 at work, but use Linux at home. So, which one
should I start with in order to reduce the effort of learning something
new and to be productive in the shortest time possible?
If you're sure you can't afford any form of PyQt, Tkinter is probably
simplest to use, but limited and maybe not as good-looking as you
might like, wxWindows is probably richer and better looking.

By the way, how do I most easily include plotting capabilities to my
Python-apps?
A couple dozen tools are linked to from:
http://www.python.org/topics/scicomp/plotting.html
and there are few others too. I do not know which one will be
easiest for you to use.
Alex


Carl


Jul 18 '05 #3

P: n/a
For a light-weight and cross-platform alternative to Tkinter and
all the others you might want to look at pyFLTK at http://pyfltk.sourceforge.net.
Of course I am a little bit biased as I am the maintainer of pyFLTK.

Andreas Held

Alex Martelli <al*****@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:<B8**********************@news1.tin.it>...
ca************@chello.se wrote:
I would like like to start doing some GUI-programming in Python, but don't
know which library to choose.

Tkinter seems a bit old. Correct me if I am wrong! The layout doesn't look
as nice as for the others.


Yes, it's old (and others have expressed doubts about its looks). F. Lundh
is preparing a revamped version but I don't much about it.

wxPython seems to be the first-hand choice for people doing
W32-programming (with MFC-experience).


If win32 is your target and mfc your experience, pythonwin may be
what you want. wxPython is, however, cross-platform.
PyGtk seems to be a modern, very clean and nice approach, but with poor
W32-support. Is PyGtk a mature library with respect to version stability
and documentation.


Not sure, sorry.
PyQt is a huge library (thanks to Qt), but not free on W32, or?


Right, either not free or limited on win32. I got a license for it as a
part of Blackadder, now out of beta and costing $50 I believe. It's
indeed a marvel of power and ease of use on all scores, IMHO. But
if you must have the full power on win32 and can't spend that much,
it's not an option.
Is there any possibility that any of the above-mentioned libraries will be
included as a standard library in any of the near-future Python
distributions?


If you mean those made by the PSF, I don't see anything taking the
place of Tkinter in the near future. Tkinter is what wonderful free
PSF tools like IDLE are based on, so it will stay. Other distributions
are perfectly free to bundle all they want.

I myself program on W32 at work, but use Linux at home. So, which one
should I start with in order to reduce the effort of learning something
new and to be productive in the shortest time possible?


If you're sure you can't afford any form of PyQt, Tkinter is probably
simplest to use, but limited and maybe not as good-looking as you
might like, wxWindows is probably richer and better looking.

By the way, how do I most easily include plotting capabilities to my
Python-apps?


A couple dozen tools are linked to from:
http://www.python.org/topics/scicomp/plotting.html
and there are few others too. I do not know which one will be
easiest for you to use.
Alex


Carl

Jul 18 '05 #4

P: n/a
ca************@chello.se wrote:
I would like like to start doing some GUI-programming in Python, but don't
know which library to choose.

Tkinter seems a bit old. Correct me if I am wrong! The layout doesn't look
as nice as for the others.

wxPython seems to be the first-hand choice for people doing
W32-programming (with MFC-experience).

PyGtk seems to be a modern, very clean and nice approach, but with poor
W32-support. Is PyGtk a mature library with respect to version stability
and documentation.

PyQt is a huge library (thanks to Qt), but not free on W32, or?

Is there any possibility that any of the above-mentioned libraries will be
included as a standard library in any of the near-future Python
distributions?

I myself program on W32 at work, but use Linux at home. So, which one
should I start with in order to reduce the effort of learning something
new and to be productive in the shortest time possible?

By the way, how do I most easily include plotting capabilities to my
Python-apps?

Carl


Thanks guys,

You have been most helpful and your advice is truly appreciated.

Carl
Jul 18 '05 #5

P: n/a
On Sun, 12 Oct 2003 18:31:55 +0200, "ca************@chello.se"
<ca************@chello.se> wrote:
Tkinter seems a bit old. Correct me if I am wrong! The layout doesn't look
as nice as for the others.


Still, give it a try. It's OK for a lot of apps, and it's usually
available where Python is.

-pu
Jul 18 '05 #6

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