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My future Python IDE article

P: n/a
Pythonistas,

My loyal fans :-) will remember that I did a Python IDE roundup for
_Charming Python_ a couple years back. Now I have another such roundup
lined up... not the very next article, but it's there on the list.

In the intervening years, I've hardly touched anything one might call an
IDE. I've looked at screenshots from time to time, and read various
announcements. But really I just use text editors and command lines.

Here's the thing: I probably have room to look at about four different
tools in one article. In fact, it wouldn't be absurd to only do three.
Past that, I cannot do more than list contact information and platform
in the available words. I'm sure there are more than four IDEs that
-someone- loves to work with out there... but I need to have a cutoff.

So c.l.py readers... make the case for your favorite one getting on the
list. I have a while to ponder the opinions advanced, should this
prompt some discussion (it may take a little while to order review
copies of commercial tools and/or get things installed).

Yours, David...

--
_/_/_/ THIS MESSAGE WAS BROUGHT TO YOU BY: Postmodern Enterprises _/_/_/
_/_/ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~[me***@gnosis.cx]~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ _/_/
_/_/ The opinions expressed here must be those of my employer... _/_/
_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/_/ Surely you don't think that *I* believe them! _/_/
Jul 18 '05 #1
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30 Replies


P: n/a
On Tue, 26 Aug 2003 13:39:17 -0400, me***@gnosis.cx (David Mertz)
wrote:

Here's the thing: I probably have room to look at about four different
tools in one article. In fact, it wouldn't be absurd to only do three.
Past that, I cannot do more than list contact information and platform
in the available words. I'm sure there are more than four IDEs that
-someone- loves to work with out there... but I need to have a cutoff.


At least you will have to comment the Komodo from ActiveState.

Rune

Jul 18 '05 #2

P: n/a
me***@gnosis.cx (David Mertz) writes:
So c.l.py readers... make the case for your favorite one getting on the
list. I have a while to ponder the opinions advanced, should this
prompt some discussion (it may take a little while to order review
copies of commercial tools and/or get things installed).


This one is easy :).

My voting goes for:

1) Emacs + python-mode + ipython as interactive shell inside emacs +
speedbar as class browser (I use this... actually I use emacs for
everything :))

2) Eric3

3) Eclipse + Trustudio

4) Another one randomly

PS: Under windows my favourite is PythonWin

--
Valentino Volonghi, Regia SpA, Milan

Linux User #310274, Debian Sid Proud User
Jul 18 '05 #3

P: n/a

"Dialtone" <di************************@aruba.it> wrote in message
news:87************@vercingetorix.caesar.org...
me***@gnosis.cx (David Mertz) writes:
So c.l.py readers... make the case for your favorite one getting on the
list. I have a while to ponder the opinions advanced, should this
prompt some discussion (it may take a little while to order review
copies of commercial tools and/or get things installed).
This one is easy :).

My voting goes for:

1) Emacs + python-mode + ipython as interactive shell inside emacs +
speedbar as class browser (I use this... actually I use emacs for
everything :))


I use the same Emacs configuration with the addition of ELSE (with the
python code templates for easy code input) and PyMacs (for extending Emacs
using Python).

2) Eric3

3) Eclipse + Trustudio

4) Another one randomly

PS: Under windows my favourite is PythonWin

--
Valentino Volonghi, Regia SpA, Milan

Linux User #310274, Debian Sid Proud User

Jul 18 '05 #4

P: n/a
David Mertz wrote:

So c.l.py readers... make the case for your favorite one getting on the
list. I have a while to ponder the opinions advanced, should this
prompt some discussion (it may take a little while to order review
copies of commercial tools and/or get things installed).


Boy, this is a hard one. I currently use IDLE for all my work, mostly
since it comes gratis with Python. For that reason I find myself wanting
to argue for its inclusion so I have a baseline for comparison.

Beyond that, I think the ones I'd be most interested in hearing about
would be eric3 and Komodo, mainly because those are ones where I've gone
to the trouble to look at their web pages.

Chris


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Jul 18 '05 #5

P: n/a
Dialtone <di************************@aruba.it> writes:
3) Eclipse + Trustudio


Mmm i don't think so. IDLE is better :-)
And i think that's not a great idea to use an IDE
that needs a JVM to run only to have syntax highlighting
and a not-so-smart indentation feature. For Trustudio you
need a JVM (~20 Mb) , Eclipse (~60Mb), Trustudio plugins
(~1.5 Mb)

For IDLE you need nothing :)

When Trustudio will become really useful, i think that'll
be the time to look at it, since Eclipse itself is awesome
for refactoring and Java coding

--
Lawrence "Rhymes" Oluyede
http://loluyede.blogspot.com
rh****@NOSPAMmyself.com
Jul 18 '05 #6

P: n/a
"Peter Milliken" <pe****@resmed.com.au> writes:
I use the same Emacs configuration with the addition of ELSE (with the
python code templates for easy code input) and PyMacs (for extending Emacs
using Python).


Cool! How does ELSE works? How could i setup Emacs to use it easily?

PyMacs? Wow :) I'll check it out tomorrow

--
Lawrence "Rhymes" Oluyede
http://loluyede.blogspot.com
rh****@NOSPAMmyself.com
Jul 18 '05 #7

P: n/a
David Mertz wrote:

So c.l.py readers... make the case for your favorite one getting on the
list. I have a while to ponder the opinions advanced, should this
prompt some discussion (it may take a little while to order review
copies of commercial tools and/or get things installed).

Yours, David...


I think it would be great to focus on truly cross platform IDEs. I
regularly use Python on Win32, Linux, and Mac OS X, and I tend to prefer
editors that work on at least those platforms (more would be great!). I
imagine other people platform-hop a lot as well. And cross
platform-ness is definitely keeping with the spirit of python.

--Paul M.

Jul 18 '05 #8

P: n/a
"David Mertz" <me***@gnosis.cx> wrote in message
news:ma**********************************@python.o rg...
<snip request for IDE suggestions>

Depending on how you want to define IDE, Leo would be my choice. I use it to
develop code, documentation, web pages as well as a arranging thoughts and
ideas in a structured way. For me, it is the best IDE because it integrates
with the way I think. The ability to represent the same information in
mutiple ways is a very powerful feature that I haven't seen matched in other
IDE's.

As a different spin on IDE's, Leo is definitely worth a look.

Paul

Jul 18 '05 #9

P: n/a
My favorites IDEs:

1)Eric3 (despite a little work still to do) under Linux;
2)Pythonwin under Windows;
3)Komodo if I would buy one.
4)Pycrust is also a useful tool

Luca

--
+================================================= =====================+
Luca SIMONETTI
networks/systems manager
INSTITUTE OF THERMAL-FLUID DYNAMICS
ENEA "CASACCIA"
Via Anguillarese 301
00060 - R O M E
ITALY

Tel: +39 6 3048 4049
Fax: +39 6 3048 3026
E-Mail: lu************@casaccia.enea.it
+================================================= =====================+

Jul 18 '05 #10

P: n/a
me***@gnosis.cx (David Mertz) writes:
So c.l.py readers... make the case for your favorite one getting on
the list.


I'll have to sling in another vote for (X)Emacs.

Even if you were to use Emacs exclusively for Python development, it
already provides an excellent environment.

However, as you approach the limit where Emacs _is_ your opearting
system, the level of integration it provides is unsurpassable :-)
Jul 18 '05 #11

P: n/a
David Mertz wrote:
Pythonistas,

My loyal fans :-) will remember that I did a Python IDE roundup for
_Charming Python_ a couple years back. Now I have another such
roundup lined up... not the very next article, but it's there on
the list.

In the intervening years, I've hardly touched anything one might
call an IDE. I've looked at screenshots from time to time, and
read various announcements. But really I just use text editors and
command lines.

Here's the thing: I probably have room to look at about four
different tools in one article. In fact, it wouldn't be absurd to
only do three. Past that, I cannot do more than list contact
information and platform in the available words. I'm sure there
are more than four IDEs that
-someone- loves to work with out there... but I need to have a
cutoff.

So c.l.py readers... make the case for your favorite one getting on
the list. I have a while to ponder the opinions advanced, should
this prompt some discussion (it may take a little while to order
review copies of commercial tools and/or get things installed).


I hope you'll take a look at boa constructor. It's an interesting
project that is rapidly becoming better than just good.

--
rzed
Jul 18 '05 #12

P: n/a
Mike Thompson wrote:
"David Mertz" wrote:
So c.l.py readers... make the case for your favorite one getting on the
list.


I'm surprised no one has mentioned Boa. I tryed Wing & Komodo, before finding
Boa.


Boa is far from finished. Depending on your wxPython version and how you
use the IDE, it could work surprisingly well or annoy you to no end in
my experience.

I'd recommend to not review alpha software like Boa.

-- Gerhard

Jul 18 '05 #13

P: n/a
Hi David,

Although a lot of posters have recommended Emacs (and maybe Vim too?),
I would avoid reviewing it (them) simply because it's been done so
many times already.

Personally, I would include:

1) SciTE - cross-platform, multi-language etc. It alters the font for
different elements of code (eg, comments are in one font, code in
another which, along with different colours, makes different sections
easy to locate - for me at least!).
2) Leo - I have tried to use this, but am not really up to speed with
it. However, it seems interesting, and like a previous poster said, it
could be used for many tasks. It seems quite powerful once it is
learned.

All the best!

Alan James Salmoni
SalStat Statistics
http://salstat.sunsite.dk

me***@gnosis.cx (David Mertz) wrote in message news:<ma**********************************@python. org>...
Pythonistas,

My loyal fans :-) will remember that I did a Python IDE roundup for
_Charming Python_ a couple years back. Now I have another such roundup
lined up... not the very next article, but it's there on the list.

In the intervening years, I've hardly touched anything one might call an
IDE. I've looked at screenshots from time to time, and read various
announcements. But really I just use text editors and command lines.

Here's the thing: I probably have room to look at about four different
tools in one article. In fact, it wouldn't be absurd to only do three.
Past that, I cannot do more than list contact information and platform
in the available words. I'm sure there are more than four IDEs that
-someone- loves to work with out there... but I need to have a cutoff.

So c.l.py readers... make the case for your favorite one getting on the
list. I have a while to ponder the opinions advanced, should this
prompt some discussion (it may take a little while to order review
copies of commercial tools and/or get things installed).

Yours, David...

Jul 18 '05 #14

P: n/a
In article <ma**********************************@python.org >,
David Mertz <me***@gnosis.cx> wrote:

So c.l.py readers... make the case for your favorite one getting on the
list. I have a while to ponder the opinions advanced, should this
prompt some discussion (it may take a little while to order review
copies of commercial tools and/or get things installed).


I use vi, so take my advice with a grain of salt, but I think you should
include IDLE because there have been so many improvements with Python 2.3
(running code in a separate process, if nothing else), and it is the
standard IDE that comes with Python. That would make three + IDLE for
your article, and you can get started on IDLE now.
--
Aahz (aa**@pythoncraft.com) <*> http://www.pythoncraft.com/

This is Python. We don't care much about theory, except where it intersects
with useful practice. --Aahz
Jul 18 '05 #15

P: n/a
me***@gnosis.cx (David Mertz) wrote in message news:<ma**********************************@python. org>...


So c.l.py readers... make the case for your favorite one getting on the
list. I have a while to ponder the opinions advanced, should this
prompt some discussion (it may take a little while to order review
copies of commercial tools and/or get things installed).


One should not forget about Boa Constructor
(http://boa-constructor.sourceforge.net/). It is very feature rich.
- it is not only editor/debugger but also GUI builder.
- integrates with exisiting Python tools like PyChecker, Bicycle
Repair Man, cyclops etc.
- automatically generated documentation and UML view.
- Zope debugger.
It is also crossplatform

Waldemar Osuch
Jul 18 '05 #16

P: n/a
Alan James Salmoni wrote:
Personally, I would include:

1) SciTE [...]
2) Leo [...]


Neither one is an IDE (they lack a debugger). They're only editors.

-- Gerhard

Jul 18 '05 #17

P: n/a
> So c.l.py readers... make the case for your favorite one getting on the
list. I have a while to ponder the opinions advanced, should this
prompt some discussion (it may take a little while to order review
copies of commercial tools and/or get things installed).


I work on Windows mostly, and Pythonwin has been great for a few
years, although it doesn't have any GUI building facilities. Lately,
due to a bug in the last release (which I have already submitted), I
have taken the opportunity to give others a try. I am not currently
interested in paying for an IDE.

I tried BOA a little while ago. My first impression was "wow, someone
has done a lot of work here". However, I didn't like the fact that I
had to mold my code to the way the application wants it. For example,
I have to always have a "main" function. Maybe that is a good
practice, but being forced to it didn't give me a good feeling. The
code it generated for the GUI was a bit verbose and it... I don't
know. It just didn't seem to simplify things for me too much. I
probably should go back and give it another try one of these days.

Idle is nice enough, although like Pythonwin, it doesn't have any GUI
building facilities. Surprisingly for me, I couldn't find some basic
features for simple code editing that I really like. For example, I
couldn't find a way to have white space visible. It also doesn't seem
to have an indentation guide feature, which I find very useful in
Pythonwin (this feature seems to me to be a must for a Python code
editor since indentation is so crucial in it). Also, I could not see
how to display line numbers (although it does have a "Go to line"
feature).

I was surprised to find all of these features as well as most other
features that I expected for basic code editing on the PythonCard
prototype Code Editor. And, PythonCard is an actual Application
builder, with outstanding GUI building facilities and all. I think
that PythonCard has the potential to be the best IDE/App Builder for
Python. It uses wxPython as its foundation, which I think is most GUI
developers favorite *free* toolkit. Unfortunately, a lot of the
wxPython widgets have yet to be integrated. However, it is already
usable for simple GUI applications. So, if you haven't given a try I
would encourage you to do so. You may just see what I mean.

I still like Pythonwin as my favorite Code Editor in Windows. But,
until my little bug is fixed I think I am sticking with PythonCard's
Code Editor.

-Ruben
Jul 18 '05 #18

P: n/a
"David Mertz" <me***@gnosis.cx> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:ma**********************************@python.o rg...
Pythonistas,

So c.l.py readers... make the case for your favorite one getting on the
list. I have a while to ponder the opinions advanced, should this
prompt some discussion (it may take a little while to order review
copies of commercial tools and/or get things installed).


You should definitely consider Boa-Constructor (be sure to use at least v.
0.23, better yet the recent cvs version).
IMHO its the most "complete" python IDE at the moment.

Ciao Ulrich
Jul 18 '05 #19

P: n/a
Hi Lawrence,

I am the author of ELSE (one of the reasons I like using it with Emacs :-)).
You can find it at http://www.zipworld.com.au/~peterm (along with templates
for other languages). There is an extensive users guide at the site (but
since most people don't like documentation I would suggest that you browse
the section on Installation, the section on "Default Keybindings" and have a
look at the Tutorial section on using ELSE - these three sections that
should get you up an going)

If you need any assistance just drop me an email, I am more than happy to
provide support etc.

Peter

"Lawrence Oluyede" <ra***@dot.com> wrote in message
news:87************@voodoo.fake...
"Peter Milliken" <pe****@resmed.com.au> writes:
I use the same Emacs configuration with the addition of ELSE (with the
python code templates for easy code input) and PyMacs (for extending Emacs using Python).


Cool! How does ELSE works? How could i setup Emacs to use it easily?

PyMacs? Wow :) I'll check it out tomorrow

--
Lawrence "Rhymes" Oluyede
http://loluyede.blogspot.com
rh****@NOSPAMmyself.com

Jul 18 '05 #20

P: n/a
"Ulrich Petri" <ul***@gmx.de> wrote in message news:<bi************@ID-67890.news.uni-berlin.de>...
"David Mertz" <me***@gnosis.cx> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:ma**********************************@python.o rg...
Pythonistas,

So c.l.py readers... make the case for your favorite one getting on the
list. I have a while to ponder the opinions advanced, should this
prompt some discussion (it may take a little while to order review
copies of commercial tools and/or get things installed).


You should definitely consider Boa-Constructor (be sure to use at least v.
0.23, better yet the recent cvs version).
IMHO its the most "complete" python IDE at the moment.


But not easy to use and with a lot of bugs. Maybe some less features
and more stability would be nice.

And it is not complete if you want to program Web Applications.
Jul 18 '05 #21

P: n/a
"Gerhard Häring" <gh@ghaering.de> wrote in message
news:ma**********************************@python.o rg...
Mike Thompson wrote:
"David Mertz" wrote:
So c.l.py readers... make the case for your favorite one getting on the
list.


I'm surprised no one has mentioned Boa. I tryed Wing & Komodo, before finding Boa.


Boa is far from finished. Depending on your wxPython version and how you
use the IDE, it could work surprisingly well or annoy you to no end in
my experience.

I'd recommend to not review alpha software like Boa.

That's not my experience. I've found Boa both stable, functional and well
priced.

I tried Wing and generally liked it, except that I'm used to an editor with
tabs for each open file and I found Wing's "one file at a time arrangement"
didn't match my way of working.

I tried Komodo, which has an enormous feature set that goes well beyond python,
which I liked until I came to run my first wxPython based program under the
debugger and it froze. I never did get to the bottom of why.

In between all this I attempted to use Eric but had difficulty getting it
setup. From memory, after some googling around, I found a few similar reports
and abandoned the effort.

I then tried Boa and haven't moved since.

My search has occurred over the last six months. About twelve months ago I also
tried the Secret Labs IDE (can't remember the name) which I found a bit of work
initially, but ended up quite liking. However this product now seems to have
been withdrawn from the market.

If you have to restrict it to 3, my suggestion would be:
Wing
Boa
IDLE

That would give you a mix of commerical and free. All are cross-platform.

If not IDLE, then Komodo which has a very inexpensive licence for personal
use..

--
Mike


Jul 18 '05 #22

P: n/a
Another shout-out for Pythoncard. It's at an early stage but I
_really_ like the design philosophy. The code editor is nice (Boa
might have a slight advantage here, but it's definitely usable). The
GUI constructor is the best I've seen, and I've been shopping for a
useful builder for a while.

Best of all, unlike Boa, the code it generates is clean and well laid
out, with a .rsrc.py file that is just a little list of dicts with
parameters for all your widgets.

YMMV
ny**********@yahoo.com (R.Marquez) wrote in message news:<8a**************************@posting.google. com>...
So c.l.py readers... make the case for your favorite one getting on the
list. I have a while to ponder the opinions advanced, should this
prompt some discussion (it may take a little while to order review
copies of commercial tools and/or get things installed).


I work on Windows mostly, and Pythonwin has been great for a few
years, although it doesn't have any GUI building facilities. Lately,
due to a bug in the last release (which I have already submitted), I
have taken the opportunity to give others a try. I am not currently
interested in paying for an IDE.

I tried BOA a little while ago. My first impression was "wow, someone
has done a lot of work here". However, I didn't like the fact that I
had to mold my code to the way the application wants it. For example,
I have to always have a "main" function. Maybe that is a good
practice, but being forced to it didn't give me a good feeling. The
code it generated for the GUI was a bit verbose and it... I don't
know. It just didn't seem to simplify things for me too much. I
probably should go back and give it another try one of these days.

Idle is nice enough, although like Pythonwin, it doesn't have any GUI
building facilities. Surprisingly for me, I couldn't find some basic
features for simple code editing that I really like. For example, I
couldn't find a way to have white space visible. It also doesn't seem
to have an indentation guide feature, which I find very useful in
Pythonwin (this feature seems to me to be a must for a Python code
editor since indentation is so crucial in it). Also, I could not see
how to display line numbers (although it does have a "Go to line"
feature).

I was surprised to find all of these features as well as most other
features that I expected for basic code editing on the PythonCard
prototype Code Editor. And, PythonCard is an actual Application
builder, with outstanding GUI building facilities and all. I think
that PythonCard has the potential to be the best IDE/App Builder for
Python. It uses wxPython as its foundation, which I think is most GUI
developers favorite *free* toolkit. Unfortunately, a lot of the
wxPython widgets have yet to be integrated. However, it is already
usable for simple GUI applications. So, if you haven't given a try I
would encourage you to do so. You may just see what I mean.

I still like Pythonwin as my favorite Code Editor in Windows. But,
until my little bug is fixed I think I am sticking with PythonCard's
Code Editor.

-Ruben

Jul 18 '05 #23

P: n/a
Just my 2 cents worth:

Xemacs/Emacs with python-mode bindings + pychecker and some screen editor
for gui apps (wxDesigner/Boa for wxPython,BlackAdder/Qt Designer for Qt
etc)

Regards
Gerrit


Jul 18 '05 #24

P: n/a

"David Mertz" <me***@gnosis.cx> wrote in message
news:ma**********************************@python.o rg...
Pythonistas,

My loyal fans :-) will remember that I did a Python IDE roundup for
_Charming Python_ a couple years back. Now I have another such roundup
lined up... not the very next article, but it's there on the list.

In the intervening years, I've hardly touched anything one might call an
IDE. I've looked at screenshots from time to time, and read various
announcements. But really I just use text editors and command lines.

Here's the thing: I probably have room to look at about four different
tools in one article. In fact, it wouldn't be absurd to only do three.
Past that, I cannot do more than list contact information and platform
in the available words. I'm sure there are more than four IDEs that
-someone- loves to work with out there... but I need to have a cutoff.

So c.l.py readers... make the case for your favorite one getting on the
list. I have a while to ponder the opinions advanced, should this
prompt some discussion (it may take a little while to order review
copies of commercial tools and/or get things installed).

Yours, David...


So, I guess the key question is what features are required to be considered
an IDE? If you're simply talking about an editor with an integrated debugger
then there is a lot to choose from and certainly IDLE (formerly IDLEfork
should be included) just for completeness. Based on the responses to c.l.py
a lot of people seem to think vim and Emacs qualify as IDEs, but those would
probably be best covered in their own articles. Just out of curiosity, I
checked the "definition" of an IDE.
http://dictionary.reference.com/sear...ment%20environ
ment

One thing I've found quite interesting about Python is that when I started
using it I was disappointed in the debugger support, since I was used to
more elaborate systems from my compiled language days. There is also the pro
blem that many Python editors/IDEs including the old IDLE couldn't debug GUI
code if the IDE used a different toolkit than your app (tkinter, win32,
wxPython, Qt, etc.) Then I realized that at least for the kind of GUI work I
do the debugger fell into the YAGNI category and I end up doing most of my
exploration in the shell at runtime or using print or log statements for
other bits. It will be interesting to see whether the ability to set
breakpoints and do other debugger sorts of things becomes more important to
me in the future.

Some people seem to think an IDE means integrated layout capabilities. That
would narrow the field considerably. Boa should be considered in your
selections regardless of whether its wxPython GUI capabilities are needed.

PythonCard, at least in its current form doesn't really qualify as an IDE
since the codeEditor is just a source editor, it doesn't have a debugger and
it is not integrated with the resourceEditor which handles layouts. A future
version will have a more integrated environment.

ka

Jul 18 '05 #25

P: n/a
Gerhard,

Do'h! Sincerest apologies. I'll report to the torture chamber for
immediate privation. I won't be allowed to use Python for a whole
week... :)

Alan.

Gerhard Häring <gh@ghaering.de> wrote in message news:<ma**********************************@python. org>...
Alan James Salmoni wrote:
Personally, I would include:

1) SciTE [...]
2) Leo [...]


Neither one is an IDE (they lack a debugger). They're only editors.

-- Gerhard

Jul 18 '05 #26

P: n/a
David Mertz wrote:
Pythonistas,

My loyal fans :-) will remember that I did a Python IDE roundup for
_Charming Python_ a couple years back. Now I have another such roundup
lined up... not the very next article, but it's there on the list.

In the intervening years, I've hardly touched anything one might call an
IDE. I've looked at screenshots from time to time, and read various
announcements. But really I just use text editors and command lines.

Here's the thing: I probably have room to look at about four different
tools in one article. In fact, it wouldn't be absurd to only do three.
Past that, I cannot do more than list contact information and platform
in the available words. I'm sure there are more than four IDEs that
-someone- loves to work with out there... but I need to have a cutoff.

So c.l.py readers... make the case for your favorite one getting on the
list. I have a while to ponder the opinions advanced, should this
prompt some discussion (it may take a little while to order review
copies of commercial tools and/or get things installed).

Yours, David...

There is a brand new version of BlackAdder available from theKompany.com
that is quite impressive.

http://www.thekompany.com/products/blackadder/

Screenshots here....
http://www.thekompany.com/products/b...reenshots.php3

Jul 18 '05 #27

P: n/a
As for me, I'm currently using Emacs, but I'd love to find a nice IDE.
I can't even use IDLE at work, sadly, some arcane problem with
upgrading Tcl/Tk on Solaris 5.3 machines, very annyoing. But
generally, it seems like it would be a little pointless to review
IDLE. Since it's included, everyone can try it at their leisure. The
same pretty much applies for X/Emacs, it's been around so long now
that by this time anyone who is going to try it is probably already
using it. Sure, have a paragraph about standard editing solutions and
mention them, but don't focus on them. I'd prefer to see some reviews
of the other, less standard editors out there, especially ones with
GUI editors, that sounds kind of cool. Emphasis on cross-platform
solutions would also be good, as I said I'm using Solaris here at
work, but Windows and Linux at home. I'd love to find a great editor
for all three environments. I look forward to seeing the article!
Jul 18 '05 #28

P: n/a
I know you can't tell us when this article will appear, but could you
tell us where?

I am currently using PythonWin and would be curious to see what the
alternatives look like, especially Komodo, because it is the only
*reasonably* priced (for a personal license) commercial offering out
there.

I was reading through the thread and I tried to try a couple of the
items mentioned:

1. SPE - Neither of the download links at blender.projects.org
worked. I tried sending an e-mail to the author, but I haven't gotten
a response.

2. eric3 - I looked at it, but it has too many prerequistes! Just
trying to find the right (free) version of QT was a pain. I never was
able to get everything configured properly. If the software requires
specific software to work, I think the least the guy could do would be
to give the right links to the required software and maybe a few tips
for getting everything to work properly.
Jul 18 '05 #29

P: n/a
On 12 Sep 2003 10:04:22 -0700, Robin Siebler
<ro***********@palmsource.com> wrote:
I know you can't tell us when this article will appear, but could you
tell us where?

I am currently using PythonWin and would be curious to see what the
alternatives look like, especially Komodo, because it is the only
*reasonably* priced (for a personal license) commercial offering out
there.

I was reading through the thread and I tried to try a couple of the
items mentioned:

1. SPE - Neither of the download links at blender.projects.org
worked. I tried sending an e-mail to the author, but I haven't gotten
a response.

Check out the author's site:

http://spe.pycs.net/

There is a link there to download the latest. I have never heard of this
one, but it looks promising!
2. eric3 - I looked at it, but it has too many prerequistes! Just
trying to find the right (free) version of QT was a pain. I never was
able to get everything configured properly. If the software requires
specific software to work, I think the least the guy could do would be
to give the right links to the required software and maybe a few tips
for getting everything to work properly.


Yeah - man, I feel your pain. I still have never got this to work...

--
Markus
Jul 18 '05 #30

P: n/a
> ro***********@palmsource.com (Robin Siebler) wrote:

1. SPE - Neither of the download links at blender.projects.org
worked. I tried sending an e-mail to the author, but I haven't gotten
a response.


A google search reveals:

http://spe.pycs.net/

Chris
Jul 18 '05 #31

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