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Installing Python at Work

P: n/a
I'm currently learning Python for my own use.
I'm considering installing it on a work laptop, knowing that it is
non-licensed, distributable software.

However, does it access communication ports? I know the company checks
their ports regularly for activity.

I won't be doing anything very serious; I'm just trying out Python,
learning the basics from 'Learning Python' by O'Reilly.

Oct 17 '05 #1
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8 Replies


P: n/a
The python interpreter doesn't do anything other than what you tell
it. That is, the standard python installation does not install any
`secret programs' that run in the background.

Like most tools, Python is as benign as it's user. However, unlike
most tools even benign users can be powerful. Wow, I just stated
somewhat conflicting statements ;)

jw

On 17 Oct 2005 08:12:35 -0700, Nikola <ts***********@hotmail.com> wrote:
I'm currently learning Python for my own use.
I'm considering installing it on a work laptop, knowing that it is
non-licensed, distributable software.

However, does it access communication ports? I know the company checks
their ports regularly for activity.

I won't be doing anything very serious; I'm just trying out Python,
learning the basics from 'Learning Python' by O'Reilly.

--
http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list

Oct 17 '05 #2

P: n/a
Many thanks. I know it sounds like a silly question, but it's the
company's laptop etc.

Does Python allow conflicting statements? :)

Oct 17 '05 #3

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Nikola wrote:
Many thanks. I know it sounds like a silly question, but it's the
company's laptop etc.

Does Python allow conflicting statements? :)

Actually it sounds like a meaningless question, but that's only because
I'm not a mind-reader. ;-) I'm sure *you* know what you mean, it's just
a matter of finding out how to help *us* understand.

What sort of conflicts are you concerned about?

Basically Python isn't going to do anything horrible unless you ask it
to, or start running programs you don't understand (which is rarely a
good idea anyway).

regards
Steve
--
Steve Holden +44 150 684 7255 +1 800 494 3119
Holden Web LLC www.holdenweb.com
PyCon TX 2006 www.python.org/pycon/

Oct 17 '05 #4

P: n/a
Nikola wrote:
I'm currently learning Python for my own use.
I'm considering installing it on a work laptop, knowing that it is
non-licensed, distributable software.


Here comes a little bit nitpicking: Python is not "non-licensed" - it
has a license, which makes it available for you free and without any
costs and some other benefist (like the ability to create commercial
programs with it)

The difference doesn't matter for you practically (for your current
endeavours), but an enormous one in legalese...
Diez
Oct 17 '05 #5

P: n/a
On 17 Oct 2005 08:12:35 -0700, "Nikola" <ts***********@hotmail.com>
wrote:
I'm currently learning Python for my own use.
I'm considering installing it on a work laptop, knowing that it is
non-licensed, distributable software.

However, does it access communication ports? I know the company checks
their ports regularly for activity.

I won't be doing anything very serious; I'm just trying out Python,
learning the basics from 'Learning Python' by O'Reilly.


Python installations are pretty benign. Note, however, that when you
install additional modules, you are trusting the module writer.

For locality, you can do a completely local Python installation in
Linux, and generally speaking, additional modules can be installed
locally as well. Under win32, the standard binary installer makes a
registry entry which is checked when additional (binary) modules are
installed. I don't think there's any other 'non-local' behavior.

Matt Feinstein

--
There is no virtue in believing something that can be proved to be true.
Oct 17 '05 #6

P: n/a
You even don't have to install Python on your system. Michael Foord
created Movable Python (http://www.voidspace.org.uk/python/movpy/),
which allows you to carry a full python distribution and more to be
carried around on a USB stick. You can copy it to a folder on your
harddisk. Just delete the folder when you're done.
This is very handy when you're travelling and don't want to carry a
laptop around.

Stani
--
SPE - Stani's Python Editor http://pythonide.stani.be

Oct 17 '05 #7

P: n/a
"Nikola" <ts***********@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:11*********************@g44g2000cwa.googlegro ups.com...
I'm currently learning Python for my own use.
I'm considering installing it on a work laptop, knowing that it is
non-licensed, distributable software.

However, does it access communication ports? I know the company checks
their ports regularly for activity.

I won't be doing anything very serious; I'm just trying out Python,
learning the basics from 'Learning Python' by O'Reilly.


Are you asking if it is ok to install Python on your company machine or if
Python does anything that might cause you to get caught doing something the
company has already said not to do?
Oct 18 '05 #8

P: n/a
On 2005-10-17, Nikola <ts***********@hotmail.com> wrote:
I'm considering installing it on a work laptop, knowing that
it is non-licensed, distributable software.

However, does it access communication ports?


Only if you tell it to.

--
Grant Edwards grante Yow! I'm having BEAUTIFUL
at THOUGHTS about the INSIPID
visi.com WIVES of smug and wealthy
CORPORATE LAWYERS...
Oct 18 '05 #9

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