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can a cut-down Python still be Python?

P: n/a
All,

Regardless of the technical difficulties involved (and I know they are
legion), I am considering developing a very limited subset of Python
fit to run on embedded systems using 80188 or 68332 microchips. My
main question regarding this is: even if I am successful, would the
results be rejected out of hand by y'all as not meeting the Zen of
Python?

Please advise,

The Eternal Squire

Oct 17 '05 #1
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5 Replies


P: n/a
If you mean missing out some of the libraries then that would be
different to missing out core functionality sucjh as generators or list
expressions,...

In general, if the end task is not to present the world with a new
programming language then it's usually best to choose from the
available, supported languages rather than creating your own.

Maybe you should take a look at, for example, Lua:
http://www.lua.org/

But if the trail leads back to Python, then go for it :-)

- Pad.

Oct 17 '05 #2

P: n/a
"The Eternal Squire" wrote:
Regardless of the technical difficulties involved (and I know they are
legion), I am considering developing a very limited subset of Python
fit to run on embedded systems using 80188 or 68332 microchips. My
main question regarding this is: even if I am successful, would the
results be rejected out of hand by y'all as not meeting the Zen of
Python?


some blabbermouths will probably reject it, but no matter how you
twist words, a subset of Python is indeed a subset of Python.

magnus lie hetland's mini-python is a good base to build upon:

http://hetland.org/python/mini-python.php

</F>

Oct 17 '05 #3

P: n/a
The Eternal Squire wrote:
My main question regarding this is: even if I am successful, would the
results be rejected out of hand by y'all as not meeting the Zen of
Python?


Have you ever asked a Zen master about Zen?

Kay

Oct 17 '05 #4

P: n/a
No, but the BFDL has the corner on the Zen of Python. What he says,
evidently goes.

Oct 17 '05 #5

P: n/a
Oops, I meant to say BDFL. Sorry about the transpose.

Oct 17 '05 #6

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