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Oblique Strategies

P: n/a
The Oblique Strategies were originally a set of one-hundred cards,
each bearing a short phrase. They were devised by Brian Eno and Peter
Schmidt as ways of working through creative problems. When a blockage
occurs, draw a card, and see if it can direct you in a tangential way
that helps solve the problem.

I have created a Python implementation that includes two different
decks. Since one of these is my own, I can be sure this is an original
contribution for all of you Python coders stuck on a problem!

Surf:
http://noisetheatre.blogspot.com/200...trategies.html

-----
robin
noisetheatre.blogspot.com
Sep 14 '05 #1
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P: n/a
On Wed, 14 Sep 2005, robin wrote:
The Oblique Strategies were originally a set of one-hundred cards, each
bearing a short phrase. They were devised by Brian Eno and Peter Schmidt
as ways of working through creative problems. When a blockage occurs,
draw a card, and see if it can direct you in a tangential way that helps
solve the problem.


Neat!

I can't help but feel that putting the strategies in a file and using
'fortune' to pick them would have been slightly simpler, but since i don't
actually seem to have fortune on my machine, i'm actually rather happy
that you've done this.

I don't know about coding, but i think this might be handy in the cell
biology research that constitutes my day job ...

tom

--
Also, a 'dark future where there is only war!' ... have you seen the news lately? -- applez
Sep 15 '05 #2

P: n/a
Tom Anderson <tw**@urchin.earth.li> wrote:
On Wed, 14 Sep 2005, robin wrote:
The Oblique Strategies were originally a set of one-hundred cards, each
bearing a short phrase. They were devised by Brian Eno and Peter Schmidt
as ways of working through creative problems. When a blockage occurs,
draw a card, and see if it can direct you in a tangential way that helps
solve the problem.


Neat!

I can't help but feel that putting the strategies in a file and using
'fortune' to pick them would have been slightly simpler, but since i don't
actually seem to have fortune on my machine, i'm actually rather happy
that you've done this.


The best things about this approach are that code and data are in one
file and you don't need to be on a machine with fortune. (My machines
seem to mostly have misfortune, aka Windows.)

I'm happy how Python reduces most small problems down to the most
trivial of exercises. This is less a program than a list of text
strings.

-----
robin
noisetheatre.blogspot.com
Sep 15 '05 #3

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