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Converting Excel time-format (hours since 1.1.1901)

Hello,

From a zone-file of a Microsoft Active Directory integrated DNS server
I get the date/time of the dynamic update entries in a format, which
is as far as I know the hours since january 1st 1901.
For Example: the number 3566839 is 27.11.07 7:00. To calculate this in
Excel I use this:
="01.01.1901"+( A1/24-(REST(A1;24)/24))+ZEIT(REST( A1;24);0;0) (put
3566839 in field A1 and switch the format of the result-field to the
corresponding date-time format).

You might guess what I need now: I want to calculate this somehow in
python.

Sorry, but I couldn't find anything in the module time or something
else to get this calculated.

Does anyone know how to convert this time in python to something
usable or how to convert this formula in python?

Thanks a lot and regards
Dirk
Dec 7 '07
18 13060
If we use minutes from 2001, then 3566839 comes out as sometime in
October, 2007 (6.78622 years). Close but no cigar. Is anyone familar
enough with Excel to translate the formula or do we have to go a-
googling?
Dec 7 '07 #11
Dirk Hagemann <Di**********@g mail.comwrote:
>Dirk
Additional to my last posting: if you want to try this out in
Excel you should replace the command "REST" by the english
command what should be something like "remainder" .
The equivalent in my (U.S. English, 2000) version of excel is called
'MOD'.

Also, you have misread or miscopied something, or are encountering
some very strange issue, as when I put your formula in excel, I get
the following output:

11/27/2307 7:00
max
Dec 7 '07 #12
Dirk Hagemann wrote:
(3566839/24)/365 = 407 - YES I did this calculation too and was
surprised. But if you try this out in MS Excel:
="01.01.1901"+( A1/24-(REST(A1;24)/24))+ZEIT(REST( A1;24);0;0) (put
3566839 in field A1 and switch the format of the result-fieldby right-
click on it to the
date format "14.3.01 13:30")

and then replace 3566839 by, let's say, "2", Excel calculates the date
01.10.1901 2:00 AM.
Hum, how can it be that Excel changes from YY to YYYY year display format ? What
does it display in the first case with a YYYY display format ?
Dec 7 '07 #13
On Dec 7, 9:59Â*am, Dirk Hagemann <DirkHagem...@g mail.comwrote:
On 7 Dez., 16:50, Dirk Hagemann <DirkHagem...@g mail.comwrote:


On 7 Dez., 16:21, Tim Golden <m...@timgolden .me.ukwrote:
mensana...@aol. com wrote:
On Dec 7, 7:20�am, Dirk Hagemann <DirkHagem...@g mail.comwrote:
Hello,
From a zone-file of a Microsoft Active Directory integrated DNS server
I get the date/time of the dynamic update entries in a format, which
is as far as I know the hours since january 1st 1901.
If it *is* then the easiest way is this:
<code>
import datetime
print datetime.date (1901, 1, 1) + datetime.timede lta (hours=3566839)
</code>
But, as someone pointed out, that puts you somewhere in 2300.
Where are you getting the 1901 from (and the hours, for that
matter). If it's based, as AD dates are, for example, from 1601,
then the calc becomes:
<code>
import datetime
print datetime.date (1601, 1, 1) + datetime.timede lta (hours=3566839)
</code>
which looks more realistic. But frankly I'm guessing.
TJG
(3566839/24)/365 = 407 Â* - YES I did this calculation too and was
surprised. But if you try this out in MS Excel:
Â*="01.01.1901" +(A1/24-(REST(A1;24)/24))+ZEIT(REST( A1;24);0;0) Â*(put
3566839 in field A1 and switch the format of the result-fieldby right-
click on it to the
date format "14.3.01 13:30")
and then replace 3566839 by, let's say, "2", Excel calculates the date
01.10.1901 2:00 AM. Try out other values like 5 or 24! So I thought
3566839 represents hours.
Dirk

Oh - sorry again: in the Excel formula replace also ZEIT with TIME
Also, Excel unformatted dates are DAYS, not hours. And it's
from 1900, not 1901. Hours are always fractional parts:

1/1/01 0:00 367
1/1/01 12:00 367.5

It sure sounds like the number being given you ISN'T the
same as Excel date serial numbers.
Dec 7 '07 #14
On Dec 8, 12:20 am, Dirk Hagemann <DirkHagem...@g mail.comwrote:
Hello,

From a zone-file of a Microsoft Active Directory integrated DNS server
I get the date/time of the dynamic update entries in a format, which
is as far as I know the hours since january 1st 1901.
As Tim Golden has guessed, it is the number of hours since
1601-01-01T00:00:00. Weird but true. See (for example)
http://www.netpro.com/forum/messagev...5&threadid=457
For Example: the number 3566839 is 27.11.07 7:00.
Y2K bug! The number 3566839 is a representation of
2007-11-27T07:00:00.
To calculate this in
Excel I use this:
="01.01.1901"+( A1/24-(REST(A1;24)/24))+ZEIT(REST( A1;24);0;0) (put
3566839 in field A1 and switch the format of the result-field to the
corresponding date-time format).
"01.01.1901 " =date(1901, 1, 1)

(A1/24-(REST(A1;24)/24)) =(A1/24-(MOD(A1,24)/24))
which simplifies to INT(A1/24)

ZEIT(REST(A1;24 );0;0) =TIME(MOD(A1,24 ),0,0)

This is a convoluted way of writing DATE(1901, 1, 1) + A1 / 24

Your result is "correct" apart from the century. This is the result of
two canceling errors (1) yours in being 3 centuries out of kilter (2)
Microsoft's in perpetuating the Lotus 123 "1900 is a leap year" bug.

If you must calculate this in Excel, this formula might be better:

=DATE(2001, 1, 1) + A1 / 24 - 146097

(146097 is the number of days in a 400-year cycle, 400 * 365 + 100 - 4
+ 1)
>
You might guess what I need now: I want to calculate this somehow in
python.

Sorry, but I couldn't find anything in the module time or something
else to get this calculated.

Does anyone know how to convert this time in python to something
usable or how to convert this formula in python?
One very slight change to what Tim Golden suggested: make the result a
datetime, not a date.
>>dnsdatetime2p y = lambda x: datetime.dateti me(1601,1,1,0,0 ,0) + datetime.timede lta(hours=x)
dnsdatetime2p y(3566839) # your example
datetime.dateti me(2007, 11, 27, 7, 0)
>>dnsdatetime2p y(3554631) # example in cited web posting
datetime.dateti me(2006, 7, 6, 15, 0)

HTH,
John
Dec 7 '07 #15
On 7 Dez., 22:36, John Machin <sjmac...@lexic on.netwrote:
On Dec 8, 12:20 am, Dirk Hagemann <DirkHagem...@g mail.comwrote:
Hello,
From a zone-file of a Microsoft Active Directory integrated DNS server
I get the date/time of the dynamic update entries in a format, which
is as far as I know the hours since january 1st 1901.

As Tim Golden has guessed, it is the number of hours since
1601-01-01T00:00:00. Weird but true. See (for example)http://www.netpro.com/forum/messagev...5&threadid=457
For Example: the number 3566839 is 27.11.07 7:00.

Y2K bug! The number 3566839 is a representation of
2007-11-27T07:00:00.
To calculate this in
ExcelI use this:
="01.01.1901"+( A1/24-(REST(A1;24)/24))+ZEIT(REST( A1;24);0;0) (put
3566839 in field A1 and switch the format of the result-field to the
corresponding date-time format).

"01.01.1901 " =date(1901, 1, 1)

(A1/24-(REST(A1;24)/24)) =(A1/24-(MOD(A1,24)/24))
which simplifies to INT(A1/24)

ZEIT(REST(A1;24 );0;0) =TIME(MOD(A1,24 ),0,0)

This is a convoluted way of writing DATE(1901, 1, 1) + A1 / 24

Your result is "correct" apart from the century. This is the result of
two canceling errors (1) yours in being 3 centuries out of kilter (2)
Microsoft's in perpetuating the Lotus 123 "1900 is a leap year" bug.

If you must calculate this inExcel, this formula might be better:

=DATE(2001, 1, 1) + A1 / 24 - 146097

(146097 is the number of days in a 400-year cycle, 400 * 365 + 100 - 4
+ 1)
You might guess what I need now: I want to calculate this somehow in
python.
Sorry, but I couldn't find anything in the module time or something
else to get this calculated.
Does anyone know how to convert this time in python to something
usable or how to convert this formula in python?

One very slight change to what Tim Golden suggested: make the result a
datetime, not a date.
>dnsdatetime2 py = lambda x: datetime.dateti me(1601,1,1,0,0 ,0) + datetime.timede lta(hours=x)
dnsdatetime2py (3566839) # your example

datetime.dateti me(2007, 11, 27, 7, 0)>>dnsdatetime 2py(3554631) # example in cited web posting

datetime.dateti me(2006, 7, 6, 15, 0)

HTH,
John
YES - that's it!
Thanks a lot to John, Tim and all the others who helped me to handle
this time format!!!

I was irritated by the date of 01.01.1901 in the Excel formula, but in
the end it was obvious that it has to be hours since 1601. Who knows
how Excel calculates in the background...

Enjoy the sunday and have a great week!
Dirk
Dec 9 '07 #16
On Dec 9, 8:52�am, Dirk Hagemann <DirkHagem...@g mail.comwrote:
On 7 Dez., 22:36, John Machin <sjmac...@lexic on.netwrote:


On Dec 8, 12:20 am, Dirk Hagemann <DirkHagem...@g mail.comwrote:
Hello,
From a zone-file of a Microsoft Active Directory integrated DNS server
I get the date/time of the dynamic update entries in a format, which
is as far as I know the hours since january 1st 1901.
As Tim Golden has guessed, it is the number of hours since
1601-01-01T00:00:00. Weird but true. See (for example)http://www.netpro.com/forum/messagev...5&threadid=457
For Example: the number 3566839 is 27.11.07 7:00.
Y2K bug! The number 3566839 is a representation of
2007-11-27T07:00:00.
To calculate this in
>ExcelI use this:
="01.01.1901"+( A1/24-(REST(A1;24)/24))+ZEIT(REST( A1;24);0;0) �(put
3566839 in field A1 and switch the format of the result-field to the
corresponding date-time format).
"01.01.1901 " =date(1901, 1, 1)
(A1/24-(REST(A1;24)/24)) =(A1/24-(MOD(A1,24)/24))
which simplifies to INT(A1/24)
ZEIT(REST(A1;24 );0;0) =TIME(MOD(A1,24 ),0,0)
This is a convoluted way of writing DATE(1901, 1, 1) + A1 / 24
Your result is "correct" apart from the century. This is the result of
two canceling errors (1) yours in being 3 centuries out of kilter (2)
Microsoft's in perpetuating the Lotus 123 "1900 is a leap year" bug.
If you must calculate this inExcel, this formula might be better:
=DATE(2001, 1, �1) + A1 / 24 - 146097
(146097 is the number of days in a 400-year cycle, 400 * 365 + 100 - 4
+ 1)
You might guess what I need now: I want to calculate this somehow in
python.
Sorry, but I couldn't find anything in the module time or something
else to get this calculated.
Does anyone know how to convert this time in python to something
usable or how to convert this formula in python?
One very slight change to what Tim Golden suggested: make the result a
datetime, not a date.
>>dnsdatetime2p y = lambda x: datetime.dateti me(1601,1,1,0,0 ,0) + datetime.timede lta(hours=x)
>>dnsdatetime2p y(3566839) # your example
datetime.dateti me(2007, 11, 27, 7, 0)>>dnsdatetime 2py(3554631) # example in cited web posting
datetime.dateti me(2006, 7, 6, 15, 0)
HTH,
John

YES - that's it!
Thanks a lot to John, Tim and all the others who helped me to handle
this time format!!!

I was irritated by the date of 01.01.1901 in the Excel formula, but in
the end it was obvious that it has to be hours since 1601. Who knows
how Excel calculates in the background...
Everyone knows. Excel assumes an integer is
DAYS SINCE 1900 and all it's calculations
are based on that assumption.

It's YOUR fault if you give Excel an integer
that represents HOURS SINCE 1601, so don't
expect meaningful calculations from Excel if
you give it an incorrect data type.
>
Enjoy the sunday and have a great week!
Dirk
Dec 9 '07 #17
On 9 Dez., 18:38, "mensana...@aol .com" <mensana...@aol .comwrote:
On Dec 9, 8:52�am, Dirk Hagemann <DirkHagem...@g mail.comwrote:
On 7 Dez., 22:36, John Machin <sjmac...@lexic on.netwrote:
On Dec 8, 12:20 am, Dirk Hagemann <DirkHagem...@g mail.comwrote:
Hello,
From a zone-file of a Microsoft Active Directory integrated DNS server
I get the date/time of the dynamic update entries in a format, which
is as far as I know the hours since january 1st 1901.
As Tim Golden has guessed, it is the number of hours since
1601-01-01T00:00:00. Weird but true. See (for example)http://www.netpro.com/forum/messagev...5&threadid=457
For Example: the number 3566839 is 27.11.07 7:00.
Y2K bug! The number 3566839 is a representation of
2007-11-27T07:00:00.
To calculate this in
ExcelI use this:
="01.01.1901"+( A1/24-(REST(A1;24)/24))+ZEIT(REST( A1;24);0;0) �(put
3566839 in field A1 and switch the format of the result-field to the
corresponding date-time format).
"01.01.1901 " =date(1901, 1, 1)
(A1/24-(REST(A1;24)/24)) =(A1/24-(MOD(A1,24)/24))
which simplifies to INT(A1/24)
ZEIT(REST(A1;24 );0;0) =TIME(MOD(A1,24 ),0,0)
This is a convoluted way of writing DATE(1901, 1, 1) + A1 / 24
Your result is "correct" apart from the century. This is the result of
two canceling errors (1) yours in being 3 centuries out of kilter (2)
Microsoft's in perpetuating the Lotus 123 "1900 is a leap year" bug.
If you must calculate this inExcel, this formula might be better:
=DATE(2001, 1, �1) + A1 / 24 - 146097
(146097 is the number of days in a 400-year cycle, 400 * 365 + 100 - 4
+ 1)
You might guess what I need now: I want to calculate this somehow in
python.
Sorry, but I couldn't find anything in the module time or something
else to get this calculated.
Does anyone know how to convert this time in python to something
usable or how to convert this formula in python?
One very slight change to what Tim Golden suggested: make the result a
datetime, not a date.
>dnsdatetime2 py = lambda x: datetime.dateti me(1601,1,1,0,0 ,0) + datetime.timede lta(hours=x)
>dnsdatetime2py (3566839) # your example
datetime.dateti me(2007, 11, 27, 7, 0)>>dnsdatetime 2py(3554631) # example in cited web posting
datetime.dateti me(2006, 7, 6, 15, 0)
HTH,
John
YES - that's it!
Thanks a lot to John, Tim and all the others who helped me to handle
this time format!!!
I was irritated by the date of 01.01.1901 in the Excel formula, but in
the end it was obvious that it has to be hours since 1601. Who knows
how Excel calculates in the background...

Everyone knows. Excel assumes an integer is
DAYS SINCE 1900 and all it's calculations
are based on that assumption.

It's YOUR fault if you give Excel an integer
that represents HOURS SINCE 1601, so don't
expect meaningful calculations from Excel if
you give it an incorrect data type.
Enjoy the sunday and have a great week!
Dirk
Sorry, but then I seem not to belong to "everyone". And it was not me
who created this Excel-formula, I just posted it as a kind of help.
And actually I just asked if somebody knows something about this time-
format and how to convert it. I think I already wrote that I did a
mistake and not Excel.
Dec 10 '07 #18
On Dec 10, 3:49Â*am, Dirk Hagemann <DirkHagem...@g mail.comwrote:
On 9 Dez., 18:38, "mensana...@aol .com" <mensana...@aol .comwrote:


On Dec 9, 8:52�am, Dirk Hagemann <DirkHagem...@g mail.comwrote:
On 7 Dez., 22:36, John Machin <sjmac...@lexic on.netwrote:
On Dec 8, 12:20 am, Dirk Hagemann <DirkHagem...@g mail.comwrote:
Hello,
From a zone-file of a Microsoft Active Directory integrated DNS server
I get the date/time of the dynamic update entries in a format, which
is as far as I know the hours since january 1st 1901.
As Tim Golden has guessed, it is the number of hours since
1601-01-01T00:00:00. Weird but true. See (for example)http://www.netpro.com/forum/messagev...5&threadid=457
For Example: the number 3566839 is 27.11.07 7:00.
Y2K bug! The number 3566839 is a representation of
2007-11-27T07:00:00.
To calculate this in
>ExcelI use this:
="01.01.1901"+( A1/24-(REST(A1;24)/24))+ZEIT(REST( A1;24);0;0) �(put
3566839 in field A1 and switch the format of the result-field to the
corresponding date-time format).
"01.01.1901 " =date(1901, 1, 1)
(A1/24-(REST(A1;24)/24)) =(A1/24-(MOD(A1,24)/24))
which simplifies to INT(A1/24)
ZEIT(REST(A1;24 );0;0) =TIME(MOD(A1,24 ),0,0)
This is a convoluted way of writing DATE(1901, 1, 1) + A1 / 24
Your result is "correct" apart from the century. This is the result of
two canceling errors (1) yours in being 3 centuries out of kilter (2)
Microsoft's in perpetuating the Lotus 123 "1900 is a leap year" bug.
If you must calculate this inExcel, this formula might be better:
=DATE(2001, 1, �1) + A1 / 24 - 146097
(146097 is the number of days in a 400-year cycle, 400 * 365 + 100 -4
+ 1)
You might guess what I need now: I want to calculate this somehow in
python.
Sorry, but I couldn't find anything in the module time or something
else to get this calculated.
Does anyone know how to convert this time in python to something
usable or how to convert this formula in python?
One very slight change to what Tim Golden suggested: make the resulta
datetime, not a date.
>>dnsdatetime2p y = lambda x: datetime.dateti me(1601,1,1,0,0 ,0) +datetime.timed elta(hours=x)
>>dnsdatetime2p y(3566839) # your example
datetime.dateti me(2007, 11, 27, 7, 0)>>dnsdatetime 2py(3554631) # example in cited web posting
datetime.dateti me(2006, 7, 6, 15, 0)
HTH,
John
YES - that's it!
Thanks a lot to John, Tim and all the others who helped me to handle
this time format!!!
I was irritated by the date of 01.01.1901 in the Excel formula, but in
the end it was obvious that it has to be hours since 1601. Who knows
how Excel calculates in the background...
Everyone knows. Excel assumes an integer is
DAYS SINCE 1900 and all it's calculations
are based on that assumption.
It's YOUR fault if you give Excel an integer
that represents HOURS SINCE 1601, so don't
expect meaningful calculations from Excel if
you give it an incorrect data type.
Enjoy the sunday and have a great week!
Dirk

Sorry, but then I seem not to belong to "everyone".
I apologize for the snide tone. But the reality is that
you DO belong to everyone as how Excel calculates time
in the background is explicitly stated in the Help files.
And it was not me
who created this Excel-formula, I just posted it as a kind of help.
And actually I just asked if somebody knows something about this time-
format and how to convert it. I think I already wrote that I did a
mistake and not Excel.
I wasn't trying to assign blame. There's a computer term
called GIGO, it stands for Garbage In, Garbage Out. It means
that even if your formulae are correct, the result will be
no better than the input, bad input produces bad output and
the computer has no way to tell this. It is the programmer's
responsibility to verify consistency. The magnitude of the
number is inconsitent with Excel time formats. That's a clue
that you can't use Excel date functions directly on this number.
It is also inconsistent with hours from 1901 as it would be
off by 4 centuries. That's a clue that either the formula
is wrong or your interpretation of it is wrong.

Once you have all the wrinkles ironed out, it will then
become clear how to convert this number to it's equivalent
Excel format so that you CAN use Excel date functions if
desired.

Dec 10 '07 #19

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by: agi2029 | last post by:
Let's talk about the concept of autonomous AI software engineers and no-code agents. These AIs are designed to manage the entire lifecycle of a software development project—planning, coding, testing, and deployment—without human intervention. Imagine an AI that can take a project description, break it down, write the code, debug it, and then launch it, all on its own.... Now, this would greatly impact the work of software developers. The idea...
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isladogs
by: isladogs | last post by:
The next Access Europe User Group meeting will be on Wednesday 1 May 2024 starting at 18:00 UK time (6PM UTC+1) and finishing by 19:30 (7.30PM). In this session, we are pleased to welcome a new presenter, Adolph Dupré who will be discussing some powerful techniques for using class modules. He will explain when you may want to use classes instead of User Defined Types (UDT). For example, to manage the data in unbound forms. Adolph will...
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by: 6302768590 | last post by:
Hai team i want code for transfer the data from one system to another through IP address by using C# our system has to for every 5mins then we have to update the data what the data is updated we have to send another system
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bsmnconsultancy
by: bsmnconsultancy | last post by:
In today's digital era, a well-designed website is crucial for businesses looking to succeed. Whether you're a small business owner or a large corporation in Toronto, having a strong online presence can significantly impact your brand's success. BSMN Consultancy, a leader in Website Development in Toronto offers valuable insights into creating effective websites that not only look great but also perform exceptionally well. In this comprehensive...

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