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Windows vs. Linux

Okay, once-upon-a-time I tried to start programming by learning C. At
the time I was younger and didn't really understand all that C had to
offer. I eventually moved over to Microsoft's Visual Basic. It was
nice to be able to design a visual application with no effort (too bad
I didn't really learn the ins and outs of programming)

Long story short, I want to get back into programming, and Python looks
like a good choice for me to start with, and maybe become advanced
with. Right now I run Windows as my main operating system. On my old
laptop I ran Ubuntu, and liked it very much; however, my new laptop has
a Broadcom wireless card, and it's not very Linux friendly. Is Windows
an okay enviornment in which to program under Python, or do you
recommend that I run a dual-boot of Linux or maybe a VMWare install to
program under Python?

Jul 30 '06 #1
53 5332
In article <11************ *********@m79g2 000cwm.googlegr oups.com>,
<no****@gmail.c omwrote:
>
Long story short, I want to get back into programming, and Python looks
like a good choice for me to start with, and maybe become advanced
with. Right now I run Windows as my main operating system. On my old
laptop I ran Ubuntu, and liked it very much; however, my new laptop has
a Broadcom wireless card, and it's not very Linux friendly. Is Windows
an okay enviornment in which to program under Python, or do you
recommend that I run a dual-boot of Linux or maybe a VMWare install to
program under Python?
Windows is an excellent environment for Python! Just Do It. ;-)

(Despite the prepronderence of Linux programmers in the dev team, there
are probably more Windows Python programmers than for any other OS,
simply because there are more Windows users.)
--
Aahz (aa**@pythoncra ft.com) <* http://www.pythoncraft.com/

"Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place.
Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are, by
definition, not smart enough to debug it." --Brian W. Kernighan
Jul 30 '06 #2
Right now I run Windows as my main operating system. On my old
laptop I ran Ubuntu, and liked it very much; however, my new laptop has
a Broadcom wireless card, and it's not very Linux friendly.
of topic: that Broadcom wireless card has a driver included in the latest
kernel 2.6.17, and probably you could easily make it work if you make some
upgrades to Ubuntu.
--
damjan
Jul 30 '06 #3
On Sun, Jul 30, 2006 at 04:21:34PM -0700, no****@gmail.co m wrote:
<snip />
>offer. I eventually moved over to Microsoft's Visual Basic. It was
<snip />

I'm very sorry.
>Long story short, I want to get back into programming, and Python looks
like a good choice for me to start with, and maybe become advanced
with. Right now I run Windows as my main operating system. On my old
A good choice. I write Python code both at home, on a Linux box, and at
work, on Windoze. I find it slightly easier to write Python on Linux
only because I can interact so easily with the OS from the command line
- there are more itches to scratch and Python is one of the best
backscratchers. Python on Linux lets me automate huge swathes of my
life with ease. That said, there is a heck of a lot I can easily do on
Windoze too. The real selling point for me is that I can work on code
for work at home, on a completely different platform, and then take it
to work and I know it'll Just Work(TM).

As a Linux zealot, I'd say use Linux :-) As a pragmatist, use what you
find more comfortable, and enjoy yourself.
--

yours,

William
woolgathering.c x
Jul 31 '06 #4
Python should port nicely between Windows and Linux so there should be
no need to dual-boot.

no****@gmail.co m wrote:
Okay, once-upon-a-time I tried to start programming by learning C. At
the time I was younger and didn't really understand all that C had to
offer. I eventually moved over to Microsoft's Visual Basic. It was
nice to be able to design a visual application with no effort (too bad
I didn't really learn the ins and outs of programming)

Long story short, I want to get back into programming, and Python looks
like a good choice for me to start with, and maybe become advanced
with. Right now I run Windows as my main operating system. On my old
laptop I ran Ubuntu, and liked it very much; however, my new laptop has
a Broadcom wireless card, and it's not very Linux friendly. Is Windows
an okay enviornment in which to program under Python, or do you
recommend that I run a dual-boot of Linux or maybe a VMWare install to
program under Python?
Jul 31 '06 #5
no****@gmail.co m wrote:
Okay, once-upon-a-time I tried to start programming by learning C. At
the time I was younger and didn't really understand all that C had to
offer. I eventually moved over to Microsoft's Visual Basic. It was
nice to be able to design a visual application with no effort (too bad
I didn't really learn the ins and outs of programming)

Long story short, I want to get back into programming, and Python looks
like a good choice for me to start with, and maybe become advanced
with. Right now I run Windows as my main operating system. On my old
laptop I ran Ubuntu, and liked it very much; however, my new laptop has
a Broadcom wireless card, and it's not very Linux friendly. Is Windows
an okay enviornment in which to program under Python, or do you
recommend that I run a dual-boot of Linux or maybe a VMWare install to
program under Python?
I recommend a triple boot mac.

James

--
James Stroud
UCLA-DOE Institute for Genomics and Proteomics
Box 951570
Los Angeles, CA 90095

http://www.jamesstroud.com/
Jul 31 '06 #6
Windows XP is fine. I am learning Python on Windows first with an eye
toward moving to Linux.

If you like, get the ActivePython distribution, which comes with the
Win32 extensions.

If you start liking Python, consider adding the IPython shell. There
are commandline tweaks you can do to make the XP commandline bearable,
in fact, I found them on this forum, so perhaps search on XP
commandline.

Good luck,

rd

Jul 31 '06 #7
I am not a programming expert but I use python everyday on Windows XP:
* python standard distribution (CPython)
* iPython
* cygwin for the command line interaction, add a unix/linux flavour to
the blend

EuGeNe

Jul 31 '06 #8
Hi,
no****@gmail.co m a écrit :
Is Windows
an okay enviornment in which to program under Python, or do you
recommend that I run a dual-boot of Linux or maybe a VMWare install to
program under Python?
I'm used to practice windows & linux and it makes sense to use python on
both because the compatibility is excellent. Take care to use os.sep as
the file path separator if you plan to stay compatible.
My favorite os is linux, but on windows you have pythonwin which is an
excellent python extension with a very good debugger. Also boa works
fine on windows but have annoying bugs on linux.
Furthermore, python comes with linux (nothing to install) and not with
windows (needs python install if you deploy on users pcs).
Regards,
jm
Jul 31 '06 #9
no****@gmail.co m wrote:
Is Windows
an okay enviornment in which to program under Python, or do you
recommend that I run a dual-boot of Linux or maybe a VMWare install to
program under Python?
Python is one of the best languages I've found for
platform-independence - significantly better than Perl. Right now I'm
coding Python that runs happily under Redhat, Windows /Cygwin and
Windows native. It also integrates closely with command line tools like
subversion, including piping their output into Python-based XML
parsers. This really wouldn't be easy with Perl.

Find yourself an editor that's pretty similar under both Unix and
Windows. jEdit is a good place to start.

You might also like to look at running Cygwin under Windows. It's a
Unix-like command shell that provides nearly every command-line Unix
tool you could want on a Windows box. Can be a little awkward at times,
but it's a huge advantage over raw Windows.

I'd never recommend dual-boot for anything!
Hardware is cheap, time and trouble is expensive.

Jul 31 '06 #10

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