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Problem with mixing doctest with gettext _()

I have a problem writing self-testable modules using doctest when these
modules have internationaliz ed strings using gettext _('...').

- The main module of an application (say app.py) calls gettext.install ()
to install the special _ function inside Python builtin. Other modules,
taken from a general purpose collection of Python modules, also support
internationalis ation and doctest testing.

For example:

utstring.py would contain some code like this:

def onOffStr(isOn) :
"""Return the "ON" string for True, "OFF" for False.

**Example**
onOffStr(True) u'ON' onOffStr(False) u'OFF'

"""
if isOn:
return _(u"ON") # notice the underscore
else:
return _(u"OFF")

The utstring module does not call any of the gettext calls, because some
other module does it when the application runs. So the doctest fails:

*************** *************** *************** *************** *****
Failure in example: onOffStr(True)
from line #4 of utstring.onOffS tr
Exception raised:
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "C:\Python23\Li b\doctest.py", line 442, in _run_examples_i nner
compileflags, 1) in globs
File "<string>", line 1, in ?
File "C:\dev\python\ utstring.py", line 513, in onOffStr
return _(u"ON")
TypeError: 'tuple' object is not callable
*************** *************** *************** *************** *****

I tried to define a _() function when testing with the code below but
the doctest still fails. The following code is at the end of my
utstring.py module

def _test():
"""_test() perform docstring test"""

import doctest, utstring
return doctest.testmod (utstring)

if __name__ == "__main__":
def _(aString):
# dummy _() attempting to get doctest to pass.
return aString

_test()
----------

Does anyone know why the doctest still fails when I define the dummy _()
function?
Thanks in advance.

Pierre
Jul 18 '05 #1
14 2624

Pierre> I tried to define a _() function when testing with the code
Pierre> below but the doctest still fails. The following code is at the
Pierre> end of my utstring.py module
...

I suspect it's because your dummy _ is not in builtins. Why not just call
gettext.install () where you are currently defining _?

Skip

Jul 18 '05 #2
Skip Montanaro wrote:
Pierre> I tried to define a _() function when testing with the code
Pierre> below but the doctest still fails. The following code is at the
Pierre> end of my utstring.py module
...

I suspect it's because your dummy _ is not in builtins. Why not just call
gettext.install () where you are currently defining _?


Skip, this looks like the way to go.

I was trying to avoid it because the translation files for these library
modules are constructed at the application level somewhere else. But I
was also considering creating a translation library for these module, so
I guess that is one more incentive to do so...

Thanks

Pierre

Jul 18 '05 #3
I suspect it's because your dummy _ is not in builtins. Why not just
call gettext.install () where you are currently defining _?
Pierre> Skip, this looks like the way to go.

Pierre> I was trying to avoid it because the translation files for these
Pierre> library modules are constructed at the application level
Pierre> somewhere else. But I was also considering creating a
Pierre> translation library for these module, so I guess that is one
Pierre> more incentive to do so...

If you really want a dummy _() you can also stuff your version into
builtins:
import __builtin__
def foo(s): return s ... __builtin__._ = foo
_ <function foo at 0x1d6670> _("hi")

'hi'

Skip

Jul 18 '05 #4
Skip Montanaro wrote:


If you really want a dummy _() you can also stuff your version into
builtins:
>>> import __builtin__
>>> def foo(s): return s ... >>> __builtin__._ = foo
>>> _ <function foo at 0x1d6670> >>> _("hi") 'hi'


I tried that, but it only works for the first call...

[Shell buffer started: python.exe]
Python 2.3.3 (#51, Dec 18 2003, 20:22:39) [MSC v.1200 32 bit (Intel)] on
win32
Type "help", "copyright" , "credits" or "license" for more information.
import __builtin__
def foo(s): return s .... __builtin__._ = foo
_ <function foo at 0x008F98B0> _ <function foo at 0x008F98B0> _('hi') 'hi' _ 'hi' _('Hello') Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<stdin>", line 1, in ?
TypeError: 'str' object is not callable

Pierre

Jul 18 '05 #5
Pierre Rouleau wrote:
Skip Montanaro wrote:
If you really want a dummy _() you can also stuff your version into
builtins:
>>> import __builtin__
>>> def foo(s): return s

...
>>> __builtin__._ = foo
>>> _

<function foo at 0x1d6670>
>>> _("hi")

'hi'


I tried that, but it only works for the first call...


Setting __builtin__._ to the result of the last calculation is a side effect
of sys.displayhook . Therefore you need to change that too:

Python 2.3.3 (#1, Jan 3 2004, 13:57:08)
[GCC 3.2] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright" , "credits" or "license" for more information.
import sys
def mydisplayhook(a ): .... if a is not None: sys.stdout.writ e("%r\n" % a)
.... def foo(s): return s .... sys.displayhook = mydisplayhook
import __builtin__
__builtin__._ = foo
_("hi") 'hi' _("hello") 'hello'


Peter
Jul 18 '05 #6
Pierre Rouleau wrote:
Skip Montanaro wrote:
Pierre> I tried to define a _() function when testing with the code
Pierre> below but the doctest still fails. The following code is
at the
Pierre> end of my utstring.py module
...

I suspect it's because your dummy _ is not in builtins. Why not just
call
gettext.install () where you are currently defining _?


Skip, this looks like the way to go.

I was trying to avoid it because the translation files for these library
modules are constructed at the application level somewhere else. But I
was also considering creating a translation library for these module, so
I guess that is one more incentive to do so...


I implemented the dictionary and use it in the code just fine, but the
doctest still fails :(

My teststr.py module is:

#--[---------------------------------------------------------------
if __name__ == "__main__":
# install gettext for testing this module because of the string
translation
# performed in the code.
import gettext
gettext.install ('impathpl', './locale', unicode=False)
presLan_en = gettext.transla tion('impathpl' , "./locale",
languages=['en'])
presLan_en.inst all()

def onOffStr(isOn) :
"""Return the "ON" string for True, "OFF" for False.

**Example**
onOffStr(True) 'ON' onOffStr(False) 'OFF' """
if isOn:
return _("ON")
else:
return _("OFF")
def _test():
"""_test() perform docstring test"""

import doctest, teststr
return doctest.testmod (teststr)

if __name__ == "__main__":
_test()

#--]-------------------------------------------------
Running the following script shows that the module runs OK:

[Shell buffer started: python.exe]
Python 2.3.3 (#51, Dec 18 2003, 20:22:39) [MSC v.1200 32 bit (Intel)] on
win32
Type "help", "copyright" , "credits" or "license" for more information. import teststr
import gettext
gettext.install ('impathpl', './locale', unicode=False)
presLan_en = gettext.transla tion('impathpl' , "./locale", languages=['en']) presLan_en.inst all()
teststr.onOffSt r(True) 'ON'

BUT, the doctest fails:

D:\dev\python>t eststr
*************** *************** *************** *************** *****
Failure in example: onOffStr(False)
from line #6 of teststr.onOffSt r
Exception raised:
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "c:\Python23\li b\doctest.py", line 442, in _run_examples_i nner
compileflags, 1) in globs
File "<string>", line 1, in ?
File "teststr.py ", line 23, in onOffStr
return _("OFF")
TypeError: 'str' object is not callable
*************** *************** *************** *************** *****
1 items had failures:
1 of 2 in teststr.onOffSt r
***Test Failed*** 1 failures.
I'm still puzzled...

Pierre
Jul 18 '05 #7
Peter Otten wrote:
Pierre Rouleau wrote:

Skip Montanaro wrote:

If you really want a dummy _() you can also stuff your version into
builtins:

>>> import __builtin__
>>> def foo(s): return s
...
>>> __builtin__._ = foo
>>> _
<function foo at 0x1d6670>
>>> _("hi")
'hi'


I tried that, but it only works for the first call...

Setting __builtin__._ to the result of the last calculation is a side effect
of sys.displayhook . Therefore you need to change that too:

Python 2.3.3 (#1, Jan 3 2004, 13:57:08)
[GCC 3.2] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright" , "credits" or "license" for more information.
import sys
def mydisplayhook(a ):
... if a is not None: sys.stdout.writ e("%r\n" % a)
...
def foo(s): return s
...
sys.display hook = mydisplayhook
import __builtin__
__builtin__ ._ = foo
_("hi")
'hi'
_("hello" )


'hello'


Thanks Peter, it does work!
Jul 18 '05 #8

Pierre> BUT, the doctest fails:
...

Looks like Peter Otten's sys.displayhook hack is required for doctest.

Skip

Jul 18 '05 #9

Pierre> I tried that, but it only works for the first call...

:-)

Pierre> [Shell buffer started: python.exe]
Pierre> Python 2.3.3 (#51, Dec 18 2003, 20:22:39) [MSC v.1200 32 bit (Intel)] on
Pierre> win32
Pierre> Type "help", "copyright" , "credits" or "license" for more information.
import __builtin__
def foo(s): return s Pierre> ... __builtin__._ = foo
_ Pierre> <function foo at 0x008F98B0> _ Pierre> <function foo at 0x008F98B0> _('hi') Pierre> 'hi' _ Pierre> 'hi' _('Hello') Pierre> Traceback (most recent call last):
Pierre> File "<stdin>", line 1, in ?
Pierre> TypeError: 'str' object is not callable


That's true. In interactive mode _ is assigned the value of the last
expression evaluated. Try it from a script.

Skip

Jul 18 '05 #10

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