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Need some advice

I am in the process of learning Python (obsessively so). I've been through a few tutorials and read
a Python book that was lent to me. I am now trying to put what I've learned to use by rewriting that
Numerology program I wrote years ago in VB.

There are times I am totally stuck (for instance, I just had an idea to put the numerical values of
the alphabet and months of the year in a dictionary located in a function. Then, I can import the
dictionary I need from that function ... well, I'm getting import errors).

So the question is this ... when I get stuck like this and seem to be banging into walls with
everything I try, is it better to continue trying different things or stop, take a break and go back
to reading a tutorial or a Python book? Or is it better that after I've tried everything I can think
of, I just post the question here, get the answer and move forward?

Thanks, Jeff
Jul 18 '05 #1
10 3098
Jeff Wagner wrote:
I am in the process of learning Python (obsessively so). I've been through a few tutorials and read
a Python book that was lent to me. I am now trying to put what I've learned to use by rewriting that
Numerology program I wrote years ago in VB.

There are times I am totally stuck (for instance, I just had an idea to put the numerical values of
the alphabet and months of the year in a dictionary located in a function. Then, I can import the
dictionary I need from that function ... well, I'm getting import errors).
"import the dictionnary from a function" ????
So the question is this ... when I get stuck like this and seem to be banging into walls with
everything I try, is it better to continue trying different things
Definitively, *no*, niet, nein, non, etc... If you don't know what
you're doing, it's not programming, it's a story about monkeys,
typewriters and Shakespeare.
or stop, take a break and go back
to reading a tutorial or a Python book?
Should be one of the first thing to do. You won't do anything good if
you don't know enough of the language.
Or is it better that after I've tried everything I can think
of,
"trying everything [you] can think of" is not programming. See above...
I just post the question here, get the answer and move forward?


First try to know what you're trying to do, and why you're trying to do
it this way. Ask yourself if this is the best way (or at least the most
obvious way) to do it with the language. Then look thru your tutorials,
books, etc to see how this can be done. Don't forget that the Python
shell is a great tool.

If then you're still stuck, you're of course welcome to post your
question here, with explanation about what you're trying to do and what
you're stuck with !-)

My 0.2 cents
Bruno

Jul 18 '05 #2
Jeff Wagner fed this fish to the penguins on Saturday 29 November 2003
16:19 pm:

There are times I am totally stuck (for instance, I just had an idea
to put the numerical values of the alphabet and months of the year in
a dictionary located in a function. Then, I can import the dictionary
I need from that function ... well, I'm getting import errors).
As I mentioned earlier it seems you are trying to modularize the
program before even getting the logic working...

Try coding it as one file first, /then/ consider what makes sense as
an imported module. NOTE: you import modules, modules may contain
functions, "constants" (Python doesn't really have such), and classes
-- your months of the year wouldn't need to be a function, just a
"constant" list, and as for the values of the alphabet? If they are
sequential (no skips or duplicates) a short function can calculate them
(in ASCII, EBCDIC would be more difficult as the alphabet is not
contiguous). See my post of a few hours ago...
So the question is this ... when I get stuck like this and seem to be
banging into walls with everything I try, is it better to continue
trying different things or stop, take a break and go back to reading a
tutorial or a Python book? Or is it better that after I've tried
everything I can think of, I just post the question here, get the
answer and move forward?
Ignoring classes for now (though I did stick one into my example code)
I'd also suggest ignoring module import (except for Python supplied
stuff) at this time... Work on understanding the passing of arguments
to a function and the return of values from the function (try, above
all, to avoid relying on global variables -- global "constants" may be
permissible <G>).
After all, your piece-meal approach without context did cause some
confusion (mostly of the "why would you want to even do this?" type).
As soon as you linked your "master number" stuff to calculating numbers
from names I was able to envision numerology and hack a quick first
approach to the entire problem (less your special numbers, and not
fully tested by hand computations, but still...)

-- =============== =============== =============== =============== == <
wl*****@ix.netc om.com | Wulfraed Dennis Lee Bieber KD6MOG <
wu******@dm.net | Bestiaria Support Staff <
=============== =============== =============== =============== == <
Bestiaria Home Page: http://www.beastie.dm.net/ <
Home Page: http://www.dm.net/~wulfraed/ <


Jul 18 '05 #3
Jay

One lesson that I remember from an old college prof: Often it is better
to have something that works and isn't 100% correct than a program that
does nothing 100% correctly.

Of course, you stated that you goal is to learn Python, so a working
program is only a side effect.

I'd get all the info and do it right....

Jay Bird

Jeff Wagner wrote:
I am in the process of learning Python (obsessively so). I've been through a few tutorials and read
a Python book that was lent to me. I am now trying to put what I've learned to use by rewriting that
Numerology program I wrote years ago in VB.

There are times I am totally stuck (for instance, I just had an idea to put the numerical values of
the alphabet and months of the year in a dictionary located in a function. Then, I can import the
dictionary I need from that function ... well, I'm getting import errors).

So the question is this ... when I get stuck like this and seem to be banging into walls with
everything I try, is it better to continue trying different things or stop, take a break and go back
to reading a tutorial or a Python book? Or is it better that after I've tried everything I can think
of, I just post the question here, get the answer and move forward?

Thanks, Jeff


Jul 18 '05 #4
On Sun, 30 Nov 2003 00:19:53 GMT, Jeff Wagner <JW*****@hotmai l.com> wrote:
I am in the process of learning Python (obsessively so). I've been through a few tutorials and read
a Python book that was lent to me. I am now trying to put what I've learned to use by rewriting that
Numerology program I wrote years ago in VB.
My bet is that the VB program will have some ugly things in it, and translating it in too
fine detail will amount to programming Python in VB, which is perverse.

I'd suggest you back off and draw a language-neutral flowchart of your old program, and mess
with that until it's a simple and clear spec of what you want your program to do.

At that point you should be able to implement it in python without carrying over VB-isms.

OTOH, you may not be ready to take full advantage of Python, because there are a lot of things
your don't know about it yet (don't feel bad -- we're all ignorant, just on different parts --
to paraphrase Will Rogers ;-)

There are times I am totally stuck (for instance, I just had an idea to put the numerical values of
the alphabet and months of the year in a dictionary located in a function. Then, I can import the
dictionary I need from that function ... well, I'm getting import errors). Sounds like your concepts of modules and functions and importing still need adjustment ;-)

So the question is this ... when I get stuck like this and seem to be banging into walls with
everything I try, is it better to continue trying different things or stop, take a break and go back If you need a hammer to do the immediate job right, is it better to keep whacking away with pliers
and crescent wrenches and whatnot, or go back to the booklet that came with your
almost-everything-in-the-box toolkit and look at the pictures showing uses for all the goodies?
to reading a tutorial or a Python book? Or is it better that after I've tried everything I can think
of, I just post the question here, get the answer and move forward?

If you can't think of what to try, chances are you are best off getting up to speed on basics,
so you know know what's available to you. Otherwise you are wondering how to build a Lego windmill
with the first dozen pieces that come out of the box ;-)

Good luck & have fun ;-)

Regards,
Bengt Richter
Jul 18 '05 #5
Thanks for the advise, I appreciate it. Yes, my goal is to learn not only how to write Python code
but how to write good Python code. This Numerology program is just a way to give me a "real" program
to write so I don't get stuck doing nothing but small examples.

I'm trying to look at the VB just to remember what I did but I think I will use Bengt's suggestion
and just forget the VB code and do this from scratch. Actually, the concept of numerology is very
simple so I guess I should write it down instead of trying to do it from memory.

All you do is ask the user for their firstName, middleName, lastName, nickName and presentName (or
married name). Then you just calculate the numeric equivalent of each of the names individually (by
adding the value of each letter in each name), and print out the appropriate file.

Then you do the same with the birthday. Conceptually, it's very simple but writing it cleanly with
Python isn't that simple for a beginner.

Some of the examples in these tutorials are pretty basic and when I see some of the suggestions I
have gotten here, I'm blown away by the simplicity and power of some of the advanced string and list
"tricks."

And, as Dennis said, I'm trying to modularize the program too soon. I kept hearing in the lessons
that part of the power of Python is to use classes and functions and call them as modules. I think I
will back off that for a while and just get the code to work.

Bruno, you asked "import the dictionary from a function" ???? Yes, this is what I tried that isn't
working:

def chaldeanValues( ):

dateValues = {
'January' : '1',
'February' : '2',
'March' : '3',
'April' : '4',
'May' : '5',
'June' : '6',
'July' : '7',
'August' : '8',
'September' : '9',
'October' : '10',
'November' : '11',
'December' : '12'
}
return dateValues

numberValues = {
'a' : '1',
'b' : '2',
'c' : '3',
'd' : '4',
'e' : '5',
'f' : '8',
'g' : '3',
'h' : '5',
'i' : '1',
'j' : '1',
'k' : '2',
'l' : '3',
'm' : '4',
'n' : '5',
'o' : '7',
'p' : '8',
'q' : '1',
'r' : '2',
's' : '3',
't' : '4',
'u' : '6',
'v' : '6',
'w' : '6',
'x' : '5',
'y' : '1',
'z' : '7'
}
return numberValues

chaldeanValues( )

I have another function called "def nameRoutine():" which calculates the numerical equivalent of
each letter in a name and I was going to import that function like this ...

def nameRoutine():
from chaldeanValues import dateValues

and then check the key of say, December, and find out it equals 12 (for the birthday) and then check
the key of say, "o" and find out it equals 7. I guess I do need to go back and learn more about this
concept.

Anyway, thanks for all the help. I'll be back. I'm obsessed with Python. My wife said she hasn't
seen me this excited in a long time :-) Some of you guys who have been doing this for a while may
have forgotten the excitment when you find a programming language that you absolutely love. It's
pretty cool ;)

Bengt,

You said,
"My bet is that the VB program will have some ugly things in it, and translating it in too
fine detail will amount to programming Python in VB, which is perverse."

You're absolutely right, there is some very ugly things in my VB code. I even thought about
rewriting that first but I don't want to go back to VB nor do I want to programming Python in VB,
which I agree, is perverse.

Dennis

You said,
" After all, your piece-meal approach without context did cause some
confusion (mostly of the "why would you want to even do this?" type).
As soon as you linked your "master number" stuff to calculating numbers
from names I was able to envision numerology and hack a quick first
approach to the entire problem (less your special numbers, and not
fully tested by hand computations, but still...)"

Please feel free to send me your code. That just might be a good way for me to learn some of this.
I'll be more than happy to test it for you :-)

Jeff
Jul 18 '05 #6
On Sun, 30 Nov 2003 03:29:37 GMT, Jeff Wagner <JW*****@hotmai l.com> wrotf:
All you do is ask the user for their firstName, middleName, lastName, nickName and presentName (or
married name). Then you just calculate the numeric equivalent of each of the names individually (by
adding the value of each letter in each name), and print out the appropriate file.


I forgot to mention that you also have to determine if every letter of each name is a vowel or
consonant - should be pretty easy.

Once I'm done writing the code, it is clean and it works, I want to use either PyQt of wxPython to
build a GUI for it.

Jeff
Jul 18 '05 #7
Jeff Wagner fed this fish to the penguins on Saturday 29 November 2003
19:29 pm:

And, as Dennis said, I'm trying to modularize the program too soon. I
kept hearing in the lessons that part of the power of Python is to use
classes and functions and call them as modules. I think I will back
off that for a while and just get the code to work.
Done properly, it is useful... But properly does require knowing what
parts are independent from the others, except for a few interface items
-- IOW, you should be able to change practically everything in the
module except the interface without having an effect on anything that
uses the module.

def chaldeanValues( ):

dateValues = {
'January' : '1',
'February' : '2',
'March' : '3',
'April' : '4',
'May' : '5',
'June' : '6',
'July' : '7',
'August' : '8',
'September' : '9',
'October' : '10',
'November' : '11',
'December' : '12'
}
return dateValues
Rather wasteful too -- you don't compute anything in there, so why
bother calling a function to build a constant dictionary? Just put the
dictionary at the top level.
numberValues = {
'a' : '1',
'b' : '2',
'c' : '3',
'd' : '4',
'e' : '5',
'f' : '8',
'g' : '3',
'h' : '5',
'i' : '1',
'j' : '1',
'k' : '2',
'l' : '3',
'm' : '4',
'n' : '5',
'o' : '7',
'p' : '8',
'q' : '1',
'r' : '2',
's' : '3',
't' : '4',
'u' : '6',
'v' : '6',
'w' : '6',
'x' : '5',
'y' : '1',
'z' : '7'
}
return numberValues
Interesting... I don't recall any of my numerology lists using quite
that odd a sequence... However... Using the code I posted earlier (and
which you seem to have missed?)... Again, I don't take account of your
special values, I'm just reducing names to a range of 0..9 (well, since
there is no way to get a sum of 0, I guess 1..9 is the resultant range).

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=- main.py
#
# main application file for numeralogy exercise
#

import Person
import Number

import sys

if len(sys.argv) > 1:
data = file(sys.argv[1], "r")
else:
data = None

while 1:
p = Person.Person(d ata)

if not p.Valid: break

print p.fName, Number.reductio n(Number.encode (p.fName))
print p.mName, Number.reductio n(Number.encode (p.mName))
print p.lName, Number.reductio n(Number.encode (p.lName))
print p.nName, Number.reductio n(Number.encode (p.nName))
print p.pName, Number.reductio n(Number.encode (p.pName))

if data: data.close()

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=- Person.py
#
# Person class file
#

class Person:
def __init__(self, fid = None):
if fid:
self.fName = fid.readline(). strip()
self.mName = fid.readline(). strip()
self.lName = fid.readline(). strip()
self.nName = fid.readline(). strip()
self.pName = fid.readline(). strip()
self.Valid = ( self.fName
and self.mName
and self.lName
and self.nName
and self.pName )
else:
try:
self.fName = raw_input("Ente r first name: ").strip()
self.mName = raw_input("Ente r middle name: ").strip()
self.lName = raw_input("Ente r last name: ").strip()
self.nName = raw_input("Ente r nick name: ").strip()
self.pName = raw_input("Ente r preferred name: ").strip()
self.Valid = ( self.fName
and self.mName
and self.lName
and self.nName
and self.pName )
except:
self.Valid = 0

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=- Number.py
#
# number cruncher file
#

AtoN = { "a" : 1, #why use string values at this stage?
"b" : 2,
"c" : 3,
"d" : 4,
"e" : 5,
"f" : 8, #<blink><blink >
"g" : 3,
"h" : 5,
"i" : 1,
"j" : 1,
"k" : 2,
"l" : 3,
"m" : 4,
"n" : 5,
"o" : 7,
"p" : 8,
"q" : 1,
"r" : 2,
"s" : 3,
"t" : 4,
"u" : 6,
"v" : 6,
"w" : 6,
"x" : 5,
"y" : 1,
"z" : 7 }

def encode(aName):
sum = 0
for ch in aName.lower():
sum += AtoN[ch]
return sum

def reduction(aNumb er):
# ignores special values, just reduces to range 0..9
# recursive definition
if aNumber > 9:
sum = 0
for ch in str(aNumber):
sum += int(ch)
return reduction(sum)
else:
return aNumber

-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

chaldeanValues( )

I have another function called "def nameRoutine():" which calculates
the numerical equivalent of each letter in a name and I was going to
import that function like this ...

def nameRoutine():
from chaldeanValues import dateValues

Since the only place those lookup tables are used are in the
conversion routine they should not be in separate module files; and
especially not if you then have to call a function just to get the data
into the local namespace. In the above example, AtoN is treated as a
global constant /inside/ of the module Number. If it was needed by the
main file, it /could/ be accessed as Number.AtoN
and then check the key of say, December, and find out it equals 12
Do similar for dates as I did for the names (maybe rename my encode()
to encodeName() and add an encodeDate() -- I think the same reduction()
function would work for both assuming your special values are valid in
both names and dates).

Please feel free to send me your code. That just might be a good way
for me to learn some of this. I'll be more than happy to test it for
you :-)
It was posted, with the same caveats as above -- that I did not handle
your special values. In fact, the ONLY change from my previous posting
(wherein I treated the alphabet as a=>1, ... z=>26 [reduction of 26
would create a value of 8]) is: I added your lookup table, and changed
the conversion function from

sum += (ord(ch) - ord("a") + 1)
{converts each character to ASCII numeric value, subtracts value of
ASCII "a" ["a" - "a" would give 0], and adds one}

to

sum += AtoN(ch)

the main file required NO changes -- the interface stayed the same.

The Person class is overkill, since only one person at a time is ever
used, but I designed it so that if you pass it a reference to an open
file it will read the next five lines from that file (setting a valid
flag if it succeeds); without the open file it will instead read from
the keyboard (a <ctrl-c> will result in an "invalid" exit, just like
running out of data in the file will).

-- =============== =============== =============== =============== == <
wl*****@ix.netc om.com | Wulfraed Dennis Lee Bieber KD6MOG <
wu******@dm.net | Bestiaria Support Staff <
=============== =============== =============== =============== == <
Bestiaria Home Page: http://www.beastie.dm.net/ <
Home Page: http://www.dm.net/~wulfraed/ <


Jul 18 '05 #8
Jeff Wagner wrote in message ...
Bruno, you asked "import the dictionary from a function" ???? Yes, this is what I tried that isn'tworking:

Hmm...
def chaldeanValues( ):

dateValues = {
.... }
return dateValues

Ok. This is roundabout, but you can do it. (Better simply to put
dateValues in the module's global namespace, and get it by
<modulename>.da teValues directly.)

It's the following I don't get:
numberValues = {
.... }
return numberValues

That's all dead code (i.e., will never, ever be reached by the flow of
execution.) Once you return once from a function, that's it...
chaldeanValues ()
So all the above line will ever return is dateValues.
I never did much VB, but it either completely destroyed your mind, or you're
approaching Python with the false assumption that it is far more magical and
different than what you're used to. (It *is* magical and different, but it
hasn't redefined the meaning of "function". ..)

Don't worry about modules for now; just stick to the basics.

I have another function called "def nameRoutine():" which calculates the numerical equivalent ofeach letter in a name and I was going to import that function like this ...

def nameRoutine():
from chaldeanValues import dateValues
Ah! Now I understand your confusion.

I just told you not to worry about modules, but I'll break my own advice,
since I see that this misconception is easy to fix.

[There's a little bit of hand-waving in the following, but nothing you'll
need to worry about.]

The "import" statement only imports modules. Modules are a special type of
object, which containes *names.* (It is not unique in that respect--every
object in Python contains names. What's special about modules is that their
code comes from separate files.) Module objects contain every name defined
in the global space of that module's file.

For example, I write a file, 'MyModule.py':

--- MyModule.py ---
myInt = 1024

def myfunc():
notglobal = 4021
return notglobal
--- End ---

I fire up Python:
import MyModule
Now I can access any name in MyModule. Well, not *anything*:
MyModule.myInt 1024 MyModule.myfunc () 4021 MyModule.myfunc .notglobal

Traceback...
....
AttributeError: function 'myfunc' has no attribute 'notglobal'...

It is this very property of containing names that makes modules handy,
because they act as new global *namespaces*.

A namespace is a collection of names. There are two kinds: local (which are
used inside of blocks of code, like functions) and global (which are
outside). When Python encounters a name, it looks for its value in the
namespace. First it looks in the local namespace (i.e., above that point in
the code, but inside the function) and if it can't find it there, it looks
in the global namespace (i.e., outside the function, but not inside any
other function.)

Modules are neat because they have their own global namespace, which is
global *to themselves*, but not *to the one who imports the module*. So any
namespace that contains the name of the module, can access the contents of
that module.

You make *your* namespace contain the name of a module, by using 'import
<modulename>' , which means, "Put the name of this module in my namespace, so
I can get to its namespace."

Sometimes we don't really want everything in a module, but just one or two
things. In such cases, we use 'from <modulename> import <nameinthatmodu le>'
'Import' here still has the meaning of "put in my namespace", but this time
you're extracting a name directly out of the module and placing it in the
current namepace, instead of placing the whole module in the current
namespace. Think of it as putting a screwdriver on your desk, instead of
the whole toolbox.

(That said, never use 'from x import y', and especially 'from x import *',
which is like throwing the entire contents of your toolbox onto your desk.
These two contribute to "namespace pollution", and generally lead to
confusion and sloppy programming.)

Let's look at your original lines again.
def nameRoutine():
from chaldeanValues import dateValues
What you're doing here is trying to import a local name from a function. So
you've done two things wrong: you can only use 'from ... import' or 'import'
statements with modules (which is why they're special), and you can't
ever[1] import local names, only global names. Local names are only
accessable from the inside, not the outside.

You've also committed a style error of using an import statement in a local
namespace. Generally speaking, you shouldn't do that, but put all your
imports at the top of a file.

Here's what you should do:

--- chaldeanValues. py --
dateValues = {...}
nameValues = {...}
--- END ---

--- Numerology.py ---
import chaldeanValues
#If that hurts your fingers, use:
#
#import chaldeanValues as cV

def nameRoutine():
# here, if you need dateValues, get it with
# the name "chaldeanValues .dateValues".
# ...
--- END ---

If you don't have enough to warrant using a new module, use a class instead:

--- Numerology.py ---
class chaldeanValues:
dateValues = {..}
nameValues = {..}

def nameRoutine():
# Get it with "chaldeanValues .dateValues", as above.
--- END ---

Classes are much more than mini-modules, of course, but you can use them
that way if you need.

An even higher-level concept is a package, which is a collection of modules.
You don't need to know about this right now, but for the details see the
very end of 6.12 in the Python Language Reference (also the url cited
there). Packages are still module objects, however, even though they
contain module names.

-- Footnotes --
[1] Unless you're using dirty tricks.

and then check the key of say, December, and find out it equals 12 (for the birthday) and then checkthe key of say, "o" and find out it equals 7. I guess I do need to go back and learn more about thisconcept.

You seem to understand dictionaries just fine, and you probably understood
modules, too (just needed it spelled out for you), but you're starting to
run into problems with names and namespaces. These are fundamental, grand,
all-unifying concepts in Python, so it's good to get aquainted with them.

In the future, when you start asking questions like "Why is this default
list argument of my function being shared by everyone?!", we'll give you the
"Names are not objects; names point to objects" lecture. :)
--
Francis Avila

Jul 18 '05 #9
I just wanted to let you guys know that I'm not ignoring your suggestions. I am trying them all and
combining them in different ways. I think I'm finally starting to get it.

So far, with a little tweaking, they all work and in different, interesting ways.

Francis, you said,

"I never did much VB, but it either completely destroyed your mind, or you're
approaching Python with the false assumption that it is far more magical and
different than what you're used to."

Maybe a little of both ;)

Jeff
Jul 18 '05 #10

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Hi I'm a bit new to the designing of custom web page controls and using them in the properties designer window - need a little advice on a concept here. I have two properties in my control - one that is a server name, which when entered will populate a drop-down list for the second property. I know that to get a drop-down list I will either need my second
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1559
by: Chris Lane | last post by:
Need Advice on prebuilt Exception Assemblies Please take a look at my post on the Titled: Need Advice on prebuilt Exception Assemblies posted on 04/21/04 Thank
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3173
by: Sigmathaar | last post by:
Hi, I'm need some advice about lists and vectors. I'm doing a program who needs to have sequential access of a non ordered unit of objects whose size decreases almost each time the sequence is finished (at the begining I have about 2500 objects in the unit, after the first acces I have 2499, then 2435, then 1720 and so on). The problem is that sometimes after a whole sequence the number of objects in the unit remains unchanged. After...
4
2849
by: Web_PDE_Eric | last post by:
I don't know where to go, or what to buy, so plz re-direct me if I'm in the wrong place. I want to do high performance integration of partial differential eqns in n dimensions (n=0,1,2,3..etc) I want to do (fast) graphic output of the results. I used to use C. I want to upgrade my computer. Do I get dual core? Does C# support dual-core? Is C# as fast as the old C? Is there a new C? (or is C# the new version of C?) Is Visual Studio...
9
1541
by: laststubborn | last post by:
Dear All, We have a big concern in our Database system. We have 2000 transactions daily in our database. We need to replicate some how the database for our fail over setup. I tried transactional replication at midnight but our all systems locked and we had a lot of complaints from the customers and It was taking a lot of time to snapshot part and I had to abort it because of these reasons. I need an advice how I can create a replication...
7
2059
by: John Paul | last post by:
I'm thinking of building an e-commerce site in php. Anyone got any advice in building one? What is the best way to implement a payment system? Are any legal issues involved? Thanks,
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2592
by: cool_ratikagupta | last post by:
hello friends i ha just started learning c can u all give me the tips to make myself strong in c lanuage . as i want to be the best in watever i do . so just a request from all of u here plz help me out in improving my c .plz guide me as a techer . to do my best in c lanuage . i m clear with the concepts i just want to improve in c . as programming is best when u use less memory space n less ilterations.
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2161
by: SM | last post by:
Hello, I have a index.php template (2 columns). The right columns contains a bunch of links (interviews, poems, etc...) The left columns contains the actual article. So if I click on a link on the right menu, the article shows on the left column. The links have an url that look like this: http://www.myweb/library/?doc=194uf7s39
0
8753
by: Hystou | last post by:
Most computers default to English, but sometimes we require a different language, especially when relocating. Forgot to request a specific language before your computer shipped? No problem! You can effortlessly switch the default language on Windows 10 without reinstalling. I'll walk you through it. First, let's disable language synchronization. With a Microsoft account, language settings sync across devices. To prevent any complications,...
0
9409
Oralloy
by: Oralloy | last post by:
Hello folks, I am unable to find appropriate documentation on the type promotion of bit-fields when using the generalised comparison operator "<=>". The problem is that using the GNU compilers, it seems that the internal comparison operator "<=>" tries to promote arguments from unsigned to signed. This is as boiled down as I can make it. Here is my compilation command: g++-12 -std=c++20 -Wnarrowing bit_field.cpp Here is the code in...
0
9263
jinu1996
by: jinu1996 | last post by:
In today's digital age, having a compelling online presence is paramount for businesses aiming to thrive in a competitive landscape. At the heart of this digital strategy lies an intricately woven tapestry of website design and digital marketing. It's not merely about having a website; it's about crafting an immersive digital experience that captivates audiences and drives business growth. The Art of Business Website Design Your website is...
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9121
tracyyun
by: tracyyun | last post by:
Dear forum friends, With the development of smart home technology, a variety of wireless communication protocols have appeared on the market, such as Zigbee, Z-Wave, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, etc. Each protocol has its own unique characteristics and advantages, but as a user who is planning to build a smart home system, I am a bit confused by the choice of these technologies. I'm particularly interested in Zigbee because I've heard it does some...
0
8110
agi2029
by: agi2029 | last post by:
Let's talk about the concept of autonomous AI software engineers and no-code agents. These AIs are designed to manage the entire lifecycle of a software development project—planning, coding, testing, and deployment—without human intervention. Imagine an AI that can take a project description, break it down, write the code, debug it, and then launch it, all on its own.... Now, this would greatly impact the work of software developers. The idea...
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isladogs
by: isladogs | last post by:
The next Access Europe User Group meeting will be on Wednesday 1 May 2024 starting at 18:00 UK time (6PM UTC+1) and finishing by 19:30 (7.30PM). In this session, we are pleased to welcome a new presenter, Adolph Dupré who will be discussing some powerful techniques for using class modules. He will explain when you may want to use classes instead of User Defined Types (UDT). For example, to manage the data in unbound forms. Adolph will...
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3229
by: 6302768590 | last post by:
Hai team i want code for transfer the data from one system to another through IP address by using C# our system has to for every 5mins then we have to update the data what the data is updated we have to send another system
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2642
muto222
by: muto222 | last post by:
How can i add a mobile payment intergratation into php mysql website.
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bsmnconsultancy
by: bsmnconsultancy | last post by:
In today's digital era, a well-designed website is crucial for businesses looking to succeed. Whether you're a small business owner or a large corporation in Toronto, having a strong online presence can significantly impact your brand's success. BSMN Consultancy, a leader in Website Development in Toronto offers valuable insights into creating effective websites that not only look great but also perform exceptionally well. In this comprehensive...

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