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Is Python your only programming language?

I'm curious about something... many Artima.com members who have a Java
background and learned Python have come to the conclusion that Java and
Python are highly complimentary languages. They would never consider
filling the place Java has in their toolbox with Python, but recognize there
are many tasks where it really pays to add Python to the mix.

I want to ask you hard-core c.l.p Pythonistas: Do you use Python for
everything? (and I'm counting Python + C extensions as just Python) Or do
you keep another language equally close at hand, and if so, what is it? And
finally, do you foresee a day when Python can be, for all practical intents
and purposes, your only programming language?
Jul 18 '05 #1
33 3967
On Tue, 12 Aug 2003 05:44:45 GMT, Joe Cheng wrote:
many [...] have come to the conclusion that Java and Python are highly
complimentary languages.
I think you mean "complementary" ; I've never had a programming language
compliment me on anything, though it'd make a nice change from all those
error messages :-)
I want to ask you hard-core c.l.p Pythonistas: Do you use Python for
everything? (and I'm counting Python + C extensions as just Python)
Or do you keep another language equally close at hand, and if so, what
is it?
My professional programming these days is mostly sysadmin tool writing.
Where I used to use 70% shell with 30% perl, these days I do 80% python
with 20% shell. That probably reflects the ad-hoc, small-scope nature
of the tools I write though.

It also reflects the fact that I intend these tools to be maintainable
by others who don't necessarily know the languages I use inside out. I
would shudder to show a complex shell or perl script to a cow-orker, but
my Python scripts are easily explainable -- one cow-orker has
volunteered the comment that "it looks like pseudocode" :-)
And finally, do you foresee a day when Python can be, for all
practical intents and purposes, your only programming language?


I do have several larger-scale programming projects in the back wings,
and those will be written entirely in Python. (Waiting has gained me
the incremental nice features of Python 2.3 :-)

--
\ "I know when I'm going to die, because my birth certificate has |
`\ an expiration date." -- Steven Wright |
_o__) |
Ben Finney <http://bignose.squidly .org/>
Jul 18 '05 #2
Joe Cheng wrote:
I'm curious about something... many Artima.com members who have a Java
background and learned Python have come to the conclusion that Java and
Python are highly complimentary languages. They would never consider
filling the place Java has in their toolbox with Python, but recognize
there are many tasks where it really pays to add Python to the mix.

I want to ask you hard-core c.l.p Pythonistas: Do you use Python for
everything? (and I'm counting Python + C extensions as just Python) Or
do
you keep another language equally close at hand, and if so, what is it?
And finally, do you foresee a day when Python can be, for all practical
intents and purposes, your only programming language?


at work I use mainly java and C.

at home when I programm for myself I normally use Python or Ruby.
it depends on the libraries available. I like both and use both.

I rarely use C or Java at home because with Python or Ruby I am much faster
in developing a solution. and I never use C++ at home.

and sometimes I play with PHP and Perl. just for fun.

Markus
Jul 18 '05 #3
On Tue, 12 Aug 2003 05:44:45 GMT, "Joe Cheng" <co**@joecheng. com>
wrote:
I'm curious about something... many Artima.com members who have a Java
background and learned Python have come to the conclusion that Java and
Python are highly complimentary languages. They would never consider
filling the place Java has in their toolbox with Python, but recognize there
are many tasks where it really pays to add Python to the mix.

I want to ask you hard-core c.l.p Pythonistas: Do you use Python for
everything? (and I'm counting Python + C extensions as just Python) Or do
you keep another language equally close at hand, and if so, what is it? And
finally, do you foresee a day when Python can be, for all practical intents
and purposes, your only programming language?

I know Java, C, C#, C++, Visual Basic, Python, Asp and now I'm getting
into Lisp and Scheme. I'm familiar with quite a few others, but these
are the ones I'm most comfortable with.

I write 90% of my code in python, maybe even 95%. I used to write
everything in C#, but I found that most of the time I was writing a
form that had buttons to push and a rich text box for output (at least
at my current position).

When we have to deploy an app with an ide we'll use either VB or C#,
and put the guts in python com classes which are called from the ide.
Python has great COM integration (much better than either C# or VB
incidentally), so it makes it really easy.

I do see a day when all my programming could be done in python
(although more likely it will all be done in Lisp). There are a few
things that need I need to learn how to do, but ultimately I believe
all the major pieces are in place.

- I need to learn wxPython or one of the variants on building good
cross platform guis better.
- I need to learn how to deploy apps to end users better
- I need to learn one of the web based python systems.

You'll note, these are all centered around technologies I need to
learn better, not techonlogies that need to be done still.

As for an IDE, I already have one, it's call Emacs.
Debugger, I just use pdb (althouh I wish it had, or I knew how to do
Edit and Continue)
Jul 18 '05 #4
Joe Cheng wrote:
I want to ask you hard-core c.l.p Pythonistas: Do you use Python for
everything? (and I'm counting Python + C extensions as just Python) Or do
you keep another language equally close at hand, and if so, what is it? And
finally, do you foresee a day when Python can be, for all practical intents
and purposes, your only programming language?

I used to learn a new language a year. But i'm afraid that python has
made me lazy. It sort of killed the natural itch to learn new languages
by removing the little anoyances I used to have when programming.

So now I start up my editor in Python mode like a mindless zombie. It
has even gotten to the point that I use it for calculations instead of a
spreadsheet and pocket calculator.

But to keep up to date language wise I will look into other languages
again someday soon. I swear. hmm!

regards Max M

Jul 18 '05 #5
From my point of view (writing system applications, servers, web apps)
Python and Java fill the same space, which is one reason I don't know
much Java.

I used to use perl + shell for sysadmin type stuff, but now use Python
exclusively for that (well... maybe some shell still for really really
short scripts).

So, the only other language I really use is C (and not just for writing
extensions).

There are some areas where I would consider other languages, For
example I would consider using Delphi for Windows GUI apps. For Linux
GUI apps I might consider Objective C just for something different, but
most likely would choose Python and either Qt or GTK bindings.

Jul 18 '05 #6
Joe Cheng wrote:
I want to ask you hard-core c.l.p Pythonistas: Do you use Python for
everything? (and I'm counting Python + C extensions as just Python)
yes.
And finally, do you foresee a day when Python can be, for all practical
intents and purposes, your only programming language?


has been, since 1995.

</F>


Jul 18 '05 #7
Joe Cheng wrote:
I'm curious about something... many Artima.com members who have a Java
background and learned Python have come to the conclusion that Java and
Python are highly complimentary languages. They would never consider
filling the place Java has in their toolbox with Python, but recognize there
are many tasks where it really pays to add Python to the mix.

I want to ask you hard-core c.l.p Pythonistas: Do you use Python for
everything? (and I'm counting Python + C extensions as just Python) Or do
you keep another language equally close at hand, and if so, what is it? And
finally, do you foresee a day when Python can be, for all practical intents
and purposes, your only programming language?

For me, it's almost 100% Python + C extensions. Even the C extensions
are getting dubious: for my current project, I took the time to write
a C code generator in Python.

I use a smattering of Bourne Shell and Mathematica for their intended
purposes. I often used Fortran in research work and a few other
things. I use Java when I want to make an applet (rarely).

Any other language I use is either for fun, or to keep my programming
skills sharp.
--
CARL BANKS
"You don't run Microsoft Windows. Microsoft Windows runs you."
Jul 18 '05 #8
In news:3F******** *******@alcyone .com,
Erik Max Francis <ma*@alcyone.co m> wrote:
Joe Cheng wrote:
I want to ask you hard-core c.l.p Pythonistas: Do you use Python for
everything? (and I'm counting Python + C extensions as just Python)
Or do
you keep another language equally close at hand, and if so, what is
it? And
finally, do you foresee a day when Python can be, for all practical
intents
and purposes, your only programming language?


I get paid to write C++ or C, use Python for recreational projects,
and use shell, Python, or (rarely) Perl for administration tasks. For
recreation and exploration I play around with a variety of other
languages, including Io, APL/J, Logo, Prolog, Scheme, and so on.


I use Python for most of my projects, but for web I use PHP. I also have some
knowledge of C++ (but very limited), and I am planning on expanding that
knowledge soon. I started learning C++ before Python, but when I saw Python, I
paused learning C++ and turned to Python.

Python can suit most of the programming needs today, but not all. It has
limitations, just as any other programming language and I think there will
always be cases where using some other programming language will be more
efficient or more suitable for some projects.

As for me, personally, Python suits my needs even now, as I am not some
advanced programmer, but I suppose I will see some limitations and downsides as
I progress.

I also play around with Visual Basic with my friend a bit when we're at school,
but he knows VB way better than I do.

--

Greets,
Nikola
( http://zweistein.cjb.net )
Jul 18 '05 #9
Joe Cheng wrote:

I want to ask you hard-core c.l.p Pythonistas: Do you use Python for
everything? (and I'm counting Python + C extensions as just Python) Or do
you keep another language equally close at hand, and if so, what is it?
We do web, systems/application, and embedded programming (that's the kind of
thing where you have a little 16-bit micro with 1K of RAM to play with, nothing
to do with "embedding and extending" ala Python). The web work is all
Python (back end) plus a tiny bit of Javascript. The systems/app work is
all Python. The embedded stuff is part Python, on the larger embedded
system which can handle it, and part C, on the tiny micros where Python
has no hope, plus a few hundred lines of Assembly code.

On a day-to-day basis, over 95% of what we do is Python.
And finally, do you foresee a day when Python can be, for all
practical intents and purposes, your only programming language?


No, unless we abandon all embedded programming. But if you exclude
that special area, where basically little but C has a foothold, and
you exclude the client-side web stuff where Javascript is the only
serious option, then we are already using Python as our *only* language,
and I have no intention of letting that change any time soon. There
is a *huge* benefit, often much underestimated, in maintaining only
a small set of technologies, including the programming languages a
company/individual actually uses (as opposed to those it knows of).

-Peter
Jul 18 '05 #10

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