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Postgresql Vs. Mysql -- Need advice

Hi Database Gurus,

Not to start a war among fanatics, but I just wanted to get honest opinion/advise of smart folks like you about this. We are about to begin development for a data intensive web based application and are faced with the choice of database software. We (at least currently) are focusing on free software. Some basic research has indicated both Postgresql and Mysql as the best of lot.

Can people please advise as to pros/cons of each of these ? I am looking from the following angles:

a.. Performance (Scalability)
b.. Reliability
c.. Ease of use
d.. Extensibility and portability (If we were to migrate to some other database engine in the future, for example Oracle)
e.. Feature rich-ness
f.. Rich-ness of other tools available around the database engine
g.. Anything else that I have missed.

Are there any pointers to any online work that has done comparisons between these two ?

Please do reply. Any help/guidance will be truly appreciated.

Thanks in advance!

================================================== ===================
Email : myoda0001 AT yahoo.com
Website: http://www.eruditionhome.com [Excellent site for data mining tutorials and resouces]
================================================== ===================
Sep 26 '06 #1
1 3792
my*******@yahoo.com wrote:
Hi Database Gurus,

Not to start a war among fanatics, but I just wanted to get honest
opinion/advise of smart folks like you about this. We are about to begin
development for a data intensive web based application and are faced
with the choice of database software. We (at least currently) are
focusing on free software. Some basic research has indicated both
Postgresql and Mysql as the best of lot.

Can people please advise as to pros/cons of each of these ? I am
looking from the following angles:
* Performance (Scalability)
* Reliability
* Ease of use
* Extensibility and portability (If we were to migrate to some other
database engine in the future, for example Oracle)
* Feature rich-ness
* Rich-ness of other tools available around the database engine
* Anything else that I have missed.
Are there any pointers to any online work that has done comparisons
between these two ?

Please do reply. Any help/guidance will be truly appreciated.

Thanks in advance!

================================================== ===================
Email : myoda0001 AT yahoo.com <mailto:my*******@yahoo.com>
Website: http://www.eruditionhome.com [Excellent site for data mining
tutorials and resouces]
================================================== ===================
IMHO,Both perform well and are reliable. I find them easy to use with
tools on the market.

As for portable - the only way you'll get true portability is if you use
something like ODBC. If you're using PHP, Pear::MDB2 gives you some
portability. But in general you're going to have to change code no
matter which database you use. The SQL will, for the most part, be
portable, however.

Postgres has more features available. But MySQL is catching up.

Tools - probably about the same. I'm not familiar with all the
available for either one, but for general purpose tools I've been able
to find what I need for either.

IMHO you're going about this the wrong way. You need to define your
requirements for a database, then choose the right one based on those
requirements. You may find either MySQL or Postgres will work for you.
Or you may find neither will. Or one, but not the other.

--
==================
Remove the "x" from my email address
Jerry Stuckle
JDS Computer Training Corp.
js*******@attglobal.net
==================
Sep 26 '06 #2

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