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postgreSQL licenseing

P: n/a
Hi,

We are planning to use the Postgre SQL in one of our commercial products.
I am aware that PostgreSQL is distributed under BSD licence. Can someone
please answer the following questions.

1) If we just ship the PostgreSQL binaries in our product(without source
code), do we need to include the BSD licence text anywhere?

2) Does PostgreSQL software makes use of any other libraries/softwares?
If yes, what are they?

3) Are there any patents applied/granted for PostgreSQL software? If yes,
what are the patent numbers?

Thanks in advance,
Sathish

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Nov 22 '05 #1
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8 Replies

P: n/a
Tiptur, Sathish (MED) wrote:
1) If we just ship the PostgreSQL binaries in our product(without
source code), do we need to include the BSD licence text anywhere?
Yes. The license says "... provided that the above copyright notice and
this paragraph and the following two paragraphs appear in all copies."
Note that it doesn't say "provided that the notice is displayed in
annoying ways", but it needs to be accessible in reasonable ways.
2) Does PostgreSQL software makes use of any other
libraries/softwares? If yes, what are they?
That depends on your platform and compilation options. See the
installation instructions for what software is required and optional.
3) Are there any patents applied/granted for PostgreSQL software? If
yes, what are the patent numbers?


I don't think anyone knows the final answer to that.
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Nov 22 '05 #2

P: n/a
Hello

How do I display the field(s) used to create an index,
as in
"CREATE INDEX <index name> ON <table name> (<field1>
[, <field2>...])" ?

I tried with psql with -E option and if I execute the
query independently then it is showing the index names
and a index definition like

CREATE INDEX ON..... from which I believe psql is
getting column names?

On what what criteria it is fetching the column
information...the only thing i can believe is that the
column names are within ()...Am I true?

Karam
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Nov 22 '05 #3

P: n/a
Karam Chand <ka***********@yahoo.com> writes:
How do I display the field(s) used to create an index,


The pg_get_index_def function is the easiest way.

regards, tom lane

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Nov 22 '05 #4

P: n/a
Peter Eisentraut wrote:
1) If we just ship the PostgreSQL binaries in our product(without
source code), do we need to include the BSD licence text anywhere?


Yes. The license says "... provided that the above copyright notice and
this paragraph and the following two paragraphs appear in all copies."
Note that it doesn't say "provided that the notice is displayed in
annoying ways", but it needs to be accessible in reasonable ways.


Which of the following count as "accessible in a reasonable way"?

1. in a separate text file, by itself (ala GPL's COPYING), but quite
deep within several levels of subdirectories (e.g. under bin/ or
etc/misc/license/).

2. in a binary (e.g. postgres.exe), that is, we modified the source code
slightly so that the copyright text is embedded in the final executable.
The executable is not compressed, so a "strings postgres" command could
view the copyright text.

3. in a separate program file (which is included along with postgres in
the distribution), in the Help > About menu or the splash screen, e.g.
"Portions of this program are licensed under the BSD License:
PostgreSQL, ..."

4. Only the URL to the license text is displayed, e.g.
http://www.mydomain.com/etc/license/BSD.txt.

--
dave
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Nov 22 '05 #5

P: n/a
David Garamond wrote:
Which of the following count as "accessible in a reasonable way"?


The usual means that I have seen of making copyright licences accessible are to:
1) List all copyright clauses in the manual, under a single chapter. This is effectively an inventory of the licenced works used in the product.

2) List all copyright clauses in a file such as "licences.txt", which is also an inventory of licenced works used in the product.

3) Display all copyright clauses in the log file of a daemon.

4) Display the copyright clauses in the scrolling portion of a splash screen (ick!) or in the Help->About screen of a GUI
Having the licence hidden somewhere - eg as unused strings in a binary - doesn't seem to me to be "accessible in a reasonable way". Would you feel it was reasonable for a vendor to publish the instruction manual in this way?

Just by two bits worth
Alex Satrapa
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Nov 22 '05 #6

P: n/a
Hello

I googled on "pg_get_index_def" and it returned 0
pages.

Where can I get more information on the function...and
in general docs on similar functions.

Karam

--- Tom Lane <tg*@sss.pgh.pa.us> wrote:
Karam Chand <ka***********@yahoo.com> writes:
How do I display the field(s) used to create an

index,

The pg_get_index_def function is the easiest way.

regards, tom lane

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Nov 22 '05 #7

P: n/a
Sorry...

the function is pg_get_indexdef and i found the docs
for it.

Thanks .

Karam

--- Tom Lane <tg*@sss.pgh.pa.us> wrote:
Karam Chand <ka***********@yahoo.com> writes:
How do I display the field(s) used to create an

index,

The pg_get_index_def function is the easiest way.

regards, tom lane

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Nov 22 '05 #8

P: n/a
David Garamond wrote:
Peter Eisentraut wrote:
1) If we just ship the PostgreSQL binaries in our product(without
source code), do we need to include the BSD licence text anywhere?
Yes. The license says "... provided that the above copyright notice
and this paragraph and the following two paragraphs appear in all
copies." Note that it doesn't say "provided that the notice is
displayed in annoying ways", but it needs to be accessible in
reasonable ways.


Which of the following count as "accessible in a reasonable way"?


I am NOT a lawyer.

However, I'm a big fan of BSD-style licenses, so here's my opinion on
what's good and what's not:
1. in a separate text file, by itself (ala GPL's COPYING), but quite
deep within several levels of subdirectories (e.g. under bin/ or
etc/misc/license/).
This (legally) is acceptable, I would think. But it defeats the _spirit_
of the license, which is to give credit back to the original developers.
I would consider doing this a cop-out to avoid legal problems without
_really_ following the intent of the license.
2. in a binary (e.g. postgres.exe), that is, we modified the source code
slightly so that the copyright text is embedded in the final executable.
The executable is not compressed, so a "strings postgres" command could
view the copyright text.
Same opinion as #1.
3. in a separate program file (which is included along with postgres in
the distribution), in the Help > About menu or the splash screen, e.g.
"Portions of this program are licensed under the BSD License:
PostgreSQL, ..."
I think this is more along the lines of what the license was intended for.
In the case of a non-graphical program, you could have a switch
(program --license) which produces the text.
4. Only the URL to the license text is displayed, e.g.
http://www.mydomain.com/etc/license/BSD.txt.


This isn't bad either.

I think the point is that people get to know where the software came from
without having to become Sherlock Holmes. 3 & 4 handle this pretty well.
I don't think the license was ever intended to overburdon you by forcing your
splash screen or home page to display credit. Legally, it would seem to
me that all 4 are OK.

But, of course, all of these are my opinion. If you're worried about legal
issues, you should consult a REAL lawyer.

--
Bill Moran
Potential Technologies
http://www.potentialtech.com
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Nov 22 '05 #9

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