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ERROR: column 'xxx' does not exist (under v. 7.4.1)

P: n/a

Using psql and running as the owner of the table "app" I
try to access the columns of the table like so:

SELECT * FROM app;

which returns all the columns in the table including
the one I'm interested in, which is "companyID".
If instead I use something like:

SELECT companyID FROM app;

I get the following:

ERROR: column "companyid" does not exist

even though the column DOES exist (the previous query
returned "companyID" as one of the column headers). Any
suggestions as to what I might be missing? I'm running
Postgres 7.4.1.

Regards,
Iker

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Nov 22 '05 #1
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2 Replies

P: n/a
> the one I'm interested in, which is "companyID".
^^^^^^^^^^^
SELECT companyID FROM app; ^^^^^^^^^ ERROR: column "companyid" does not exist

^^^^^^^^^^^
Look closely at the capitalization and quoting.
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GPG key ID E4071346 @ wwwkeys.pgp.net
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Nov 22 '05 #2

P: n/a
On Thu, Feb 05, 2004 at 10:00:21AM -0500, Iker Arizmendi wrote:

Using psql and running as the owner of the table "app" I
try to access the columns of the table like so:

SELECT * FROM app;

which returns all the columns in the table including
the one I'm interested in, which is "companyID".
If instead I use something like:

SELECT companyID FROM app;

I get the following:

ERROR: column "companyid" does not exist


SELECT "companyID" FROM app;

You've stored a case sensitive column name in the table, but
by default Postgres will fold all identifiers to lower case
unless quoted.

--Joe

--
Joe Sunday <su****@csh.rit.edu> http://www.csh.rit.edu/~sunday/
Computer Science House, Rochester Inst. Of Technology

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Nov 23 '05 #3

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