By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
437,663 Members | 1,375 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 437,663 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

Storage consumption

P: n/a
Hello,

For some very data-intensive projects it's interesting how much space the
DBMS uses for the storage of data, so I'm investigating how space
efficient different DBMSes are.

In the PostgreSQL manual, it's written that values of the type INTEGER
take op four bytes. I was curious about how close to real-World this
number is, so I did a test: How much space does PostgreSQL use when
storing 100000 rows where each row consists of a single INTEGER value?

With help from http://random.org/ I created a file with 100000 random
integer insertions. The SQL used to do that is available at
http://troels.arvin.dk/db/tests/stor...randomints.zip

About installation: PostgreSQL v. 7.3.4 on Red Hat Linux 9, file system
ext3. PostgreSQL data-area in /var/lib/pgsql/data.

For this test, PostgreSQL is being used for nothing else.

Before test start:
-----------------
Access to a default database ('psql' brings you right into a working
database) from psql.
Access to do a 'du' (disk usage unix-command) on /var/lib/pgsql/data from
the command line.
No existing table 'inttab' in database. PostgreSQL stopped.

Test starts.
-----------
Output of 'du -sb /var/lib/pgsql/data': 77946519.
Start PostgreSQL.
Do: "CREATE TABLE inttab (intval INT) WITHOUT OIDS;"
psql -q -f random_ints.sql
(Wait for a long time.)
Do: "VACUUM FULL;"
Shut down PostgreSQL.
Output of 'du -sb /var/lib/pgsql/data': 81190551.

Result:
------
Real difference: 81190551-77946519 = 3244032
Optimal difference: 100000*4 = 400000
Storage consumption rate ((real/optimal)*100)% = 811%

I'm surprised by an overhead _that_ high. Any comments on my methology?
Does it need adjustments? If you think it's rotten: What methology would
you use to measure space overhead for a DBMS? (Again: Space overhead is
seldomly interesting, but sometimes it is.)

I guess that transaction log files are a joker in this context, but then
again: A number which reflects the DBMS' disk usage before and after an
operation does have real-World meaning, I think.

(Of course, I'll need another methology for DBMSes which preallocate a
fixed amount of storage for a database.)

--
Greetings from Troels Arvin, Copenhagen, Denmark

---------------------------(end of broadcast)---------------------------
TIP 5: Have you checked our extensive FAQ?

http://www.postgresql.org/docs/faqs/FAQ.html

Nov 12 '05 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
2 Replies


P: n/a

Did you see the FAQ item on estimating disk space?

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Troels Arvin wrote:
Hello,

For some very data-intensive projects it's interesting how much space the
DBMS uses for the storage of data, so I'm investigating how space
efficient different DBMSes are.

In the PostgreSQL manual, it's written that values of the type INTEGER
take op four bytes. I was curious about how close to real-World this
number is, so I did a test: How much space does PostgreSQL use when
storing 100000 rows where each row consists of a single INTEGER value?

With help from http://random.org/ I created a file with 100000 random
integer insertions. The SQL used to do that is available at
http://troels.arvin.dk/db/tests/stor...randomints.zip

About installation: PostgreSQL v. 7.3.4 on Red Hat Linux 9, file system
ext3. PostgreSQL data-area in /var/lib/pgsql/data.

For this test, PostgreSQL is being used for nothing else.

Before test start:
-----------------
Access to a default database ('psql' brings you right into a working
database) from psql.
Access to do a 'du' (disk usage unix-command) on /var/lib/pgsql/data from
the command line.
No existing table 'inttab' in database. PostgreSQL stopped.

Test starts.
-----------
Output of 'du -sb /var/lib/pgsql/data': 77946519.
Start PostgreSQL.
Do: "CREATE TABLE inttab (intval INT) WITHOUT OIDS;"
psql -q -f random_ints.sql
(Wait for a long time.)
Do: "VACUUM FULL;"
Shut down PostgreSQL.
Output of 'du -sb /var/lib/pgsql/data': 81190551.

Result:
------
Real difference: 81190551-77946519 = 3244032
Optimal difference: 100000*4 = 400000
Storage consumption rate ((real/optimal)*100)% = 811%

I'm surprised by an overhead _that_ high. Any comments on my methology?
Does it need adjustments? If you think it's rotten: What methology would
you use to measure space overhead for a DBMS? (Again: Space overhead is
seldomly interesting, but sometimes it is.)

I guess that transaction log files are a joker in this context, but then
again: A number which reflects the DBMS' disk usage before and after an
operation does have real-World meaning, I think.

(Of course, I'll need another methology for DBMSes which preallocate a
fixed amount of storage for a database.)

--
Greetings from Troels Arvin, Copenhagen, Denmark

---------------------------(end of broadcast)---------------------------
TIP 5: Have you checked our extensive FAQ?

http://www.postgresql.org/docs/faqs/FAQ.html


--
Bruce Momjian | http://candle.pha.pa.us
pg***@candle.pha.pa.us | (610) 359-1001
+ If your life is a hard drive, | 13 Roberts Road
+ Christ can be your backup. | Newtown Square, Pennsylvania 19073

---------------------------(end of broadcast)---------------------------
TIP 3: if posting/reading through Usenet, please send an appropriate
subscribe-nomail command to ma*******@postgresql.org so that your
message can get through to the mailing list cleanly

Nov 12 '05 #2

P: n/a


On Fri, 14 Nov 2003, Troels Arvin wrote:
Hello,

For some very data-intensive projects it's interesting how much space the
DBMS uses for the storage of data, so I'm investigating how space
efficient different DBMSes are.

In the PostgreSQL manual, it's written that values of the type INTEGER
take op four bytes. I was curious about how close to real-World this
number is, so I did a test: How much space does PostgreSQL use when
storing 100000 rows where each row consists of a single INTEGER value?


You are measuring the space used to store one row of one int column. To
test the space used just by one int column a more accurate test would be
to measure the difference in disk usage between a table with one int
column and a table with two int columns.

Kris Jurka
---------------------------(end of broadcast)---------------------------
TIP 2: you can get off all lists at once with the unregister command
(send "unregister YourEmailAddressHere" to ma*******@postgresql.org)

Nov 12 '05 #3

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.