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High-volume shop uses PostgreSQL

P: n/a
http://www.computerworld.com.au/inde...8&fp=16&fpid=0

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-----------------------------------------------------------------
Ron Johnson, Jr. ro***********@cox.net
Jefferson, LA USA

LUKE: Is Perl better than Python?
YODA: No... no... no. Quicker, easier, more seductive.
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YODA: You will know. When your code you try to read six months
from now.
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TIP 4: Don't 'kill -9' the postmaster

Nov 11 '05 #1
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P: n/a
Kewl article.

Ron Johnson wrote:
http://www.computerworld.com.au/inde...8&fp=16&fpid=0

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Nov 11 '05 #2

P: n/a
On Wednesday 17 September 2003 04:56 pm, Ron Johnson wrote:
http://www.computerworld.com.au/inde...8&fp=16&fpid=0


I do not understand what people mean when they differentiate between scaling
vertically versus scaling horizontally.

Would someone provide a brief explanation?

Thanks,

Andrew Gould

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Nov 11 '05 #3

P: n/a
Ben
high: mainframe
wide: web server farm

On Wed, 17 Sep 2003, Andrew L. Gould wrote:
On Wednesday 17 September 2003 04:56 pm, Ron Johnson wrote:
http://www.computerworld.com.au/inde...8&fp=16&fpid=0


I do not understand what people mean when they differentiate between scaling
vertically versus scaling horizontally.

Would someone provide a brief explanation?

Thanks,

Andrew Gould

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Nov 11 '05 #4

P: n/a
Ben wrote:
high: mainframe
wide: web server farm

phd: piled higher and deeper

(given to me by a holder of such a degree - no offense intended)
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Nov 11 '05 #5

P: n/a
And on this issue, how does Postgres work better on the web server farm
that than other DBMSs?

I thought it actually had achilles heels in that kind of usage?

i.e.
One postmaster
No extents (or whatever thta word is)
Didn't work well with SAN's

Ben wrote:
high: mainframe
wide: web server farm

On Wed, 17 Sep 2003, Andrew L. Gould wrote:
On Wednesday 17 September 2003 04:56 pm, Ron Johnson wrote:

http://www.computerworld.com.au/inde...8&fp=16&fpid=0

I do not understand what people mean when they differentiate between scaling
vertically versus scaling horizontally.

Would someone provide a brief explanation?

Thanks,

Andrew Gould

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http://www.postgresql.org/docs/faqs/FAQ.html


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Nov 11 '05 #6

P: n/a
On Wednesday 17 September 2003 05:50 pm, Ben wrote:
high: mainframe
wide: web server farm

On Wed, 17 Sep 2003, Andrew L. Gould wrote:


Thanks,

Andrew Gould
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Nov 11 '05 #7

P: n/a
On Wed, 2003-09-17 at 17:50, Ben wrote:
high: mainframe
wide: web server farm
These explanations are too limiting.
vertical: large box that can hold lots of CPUs that all the same
instance of the same OS. IBM (mainframe and Power),
Sun, HP (PA-RISC, Alpha) & SGI all offer these systems,
and they cost a lot.
horizontal: distributed systems (SETI@Home is the classic example
or clusters (of the VMS [and Oracle 9i RAC] or Beowulf
variety).

PostgreSQL does not do horizontal scaling at all, since the postmaster
can only run on 1 CPU, but it's good at vertical scaling, since it
can make use of all of the CPUs in a box. (Well, there's sure to
be a point at which there is so much activity that the postmaster
can't handle it all...)
On Wed, 17 Sep 2003, Andrew L. Gould wrote:
On Wednesday 17 September 2003 04:56 pm, Ron Johnson wrote:
http://www.computerworld.com.au/inde...8&fp=16&fpid=0


I do not understand what people mean when they differentiate between scaling
vertically versus scaling horizontally.

Would someone provide a brief explanation?


--
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Ron Johnson, Jr. ro***********@cox.net
Jefferson, LA USA

"Fair is where you take your cows to be judged."
Unknown
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Nov 11 '05 #8

P: n/a
Ron Johnson wrote:
PostgreSQL does not do horizontal scaling at all, since the postmaster
can only run on 1 CPU, but it's good at vertical scaling, since it
can make use of all of the CPUs in a box. (Well, there's sure to
be a point at which there is so much activity that the postmaster
can't handle it all...)


I seen some PCI cards that permits to have a shared memory shared
between more boxes, I'd like know how much effort is required to permit
postgres to run on two or more machine and have the shared memory shared
between the boxes.
Regards
Gaetano Mendola
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Nov 11 '05 #9

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> http://www.computerworld.com.au/inde...8&fp=16&fpid=0

Stuff for the advocacy page ??

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Nov 11 '05 #10

P: n/a
On Thu, 2003-09-18 at 03:23, Gaetano Mendola wrote:
Ron Johnson wrote:
PostgreSQL does not do horizontal scaling at all, since the postmaster
can only run on 1 CPU, but it's good at vertical scaling, since it
can make use of all of the CPUs in a box. (Well, there's sure to
be a point at which there is so much activity that the postmaster
can't handle it all...)


I seen some PCI cards that permits to have a shared memory shared
between more boxes, I'd like know how much effort is required to permit
postgres to run on two or more machine and have the shared memory shared
between the boxes.


HPaq/DEC has a hardware/software product called MemoryChannel, which
does that for you. Of course, it only works with Tru64 and OpenVMS.

--
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Ron Johnson, Jr. ro***********@cox.net
Jefferson, LA USA

484,246 sq mi are needed for 6 billion people to live, 4 persons
per lot, in lots that are 60'x150'.
That is ~ California, Texas and Missouri.
Alternatively, France, Spain and The United Kingdom.
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Nov 11 '05 #11

P: n/a
Ron Johnson wrote:
On Thu, 2003-09-18 at 03:23, Gaetano Mendola wrote:
Ron Johnson wrote:
PostgreSQL does not do horizontal scaling at all, since the postmaster
can only run on 1 CPU, but it's good at vertical scaling, since it
can make use of all of the CPUs in a box. (Well, there's sure to
be a point at which there is so much activity that the postmaster
can't handle it all...)


I seen some PCI cards that permits to have a shared memory shared
between more boxes, I'd like know how much effort is required to permit
postgres to run on two or more machine and have the shared memory shared
between the boxes.

HPaq/DEC has a hardware/software product called MemoryChannel, which
does that for you. Of course, it only works with Tru64 and OpenVMS.

I knew the existence of this hardware my concern is about made the
postmaster aware that another postmaster is running on another machine
and that the underlyng shared memory is shared between two/more boxes.
Regards
Gaetano Mendola
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Nov 11 '05 #12

P: n/a
On Thu, 2003-09-18 at 10:14, Gaetano Mendola wrote:
Ron Johnson wrote:
On Thu, 2003-09-18 at 03:23, Gaetano Mendola wrote:
Ron Johnson wrote:

PostgreSQL does not do horizontal scaling at all, since the postmaster
can only run on 1 CPU, but it's good at vertical scaling, since it
can make use of all of the CPUs in a box. (Well, there's sure to
be a point at which there is so much activity that the postmaster
can't handle it all...)

I seen some PCI cards that permits to have a shared memory shared
between more boxes, I'd like know how much effort is required to permit
postgres to run on two or more machine and have the shared memory shared
between the boxes.

HPaq/DEC has a hardware/software product called MemoryChannel, which
does that for you. Of course, it only works with Tru64 and OpenVMS.

I knew the existence of this hardware my concern is about made the
postmaster aware that another postmaster is running on another machine
and that the underlyng shared memory is shared between two/more boxes.


You'd need mechanisms to synchronize the systems. Oracle does this
in 9i RAC by licensing Compaq/DEC VAXcluster technology for creating
and managing lock trees across the network.

--
-----------------------------------------------------------------
Ron Johnson, Jr. ro***********@cox.net
Jefferson, LA USA

"Object-oriented programming is an exceptionally bad idea which
could only have originated in California."
Edsger Dijkstra
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Nov 11 '05 #13

This discussion thread is closed

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